National Gallery of Art - THE COLLECTION
image of Elijah Fed by the Raven Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo (artist)
Brescian, c. 1480 - 1548 or after
Elijah Fed by the Raven, c. 1510
oil on panel transferred to canvas
overall: 168 x 135.6 cm (66 1/8 x 53 3/8 in.) framed: 199.1 x 166.2 x 8.6 cm (78 3/8 x 65 7/16 x 3 3/8 in.)
Samuel H. Kress Collection
1961.9.35
On View
From the Tour: Venice and the North
Object 5 of 6

Provenance

Possibly commissioned c. 1510 by a Carmelite monastery in Brescia, Italy; probably sold into Manfrin collection, Venice, formed in part by Girolamo Manfrin [d. 1800/1802]; by inheritance to Pietro Manfrin; by inheritance to Giulia-Giovanna Manfrin-Plattis [d. 1848/1849];[1] collection divided between Marquis Antonio-Maria Plattis and Bortolina Plattis, widow of Baron Sardagna; (Plattis sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 13 May 1870, no. 73). Charles A. Loeser [1864-1928], Florence, from the 1890s; by inheritance to his daughter, Mrs. Ronald Calnan, Milan; sold 1954 to (Count Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Florence);[2] sold 1954 to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New York;[3] gift 1961 to NGA.

[1] The 1851 manuscript inventory is in the archives of the National Gallery, London. For more information on the dispersal of the Manfrin collection, see M. Davies, National Gallery Catalogues: Earlier Italian Schools, London, 1961: 135.

[2] According to Kress files in NGA curatorial records.

[3] On 7 June 1954 the Kress Foundation made an offer to Contini-Bonacossi for sixteen paintings, including the NGA painting which was listed as The Prophet Elijah by Savoldo. In a draft of one of the documents prepared for the Count's signature in connection with the offer this painting is described as one "which came from my personal collection in Florence." The Count accepted the offer on 30 June 1954; the final payment for the purchase was ultimately made in early 1957, after the Count's death in 1955. (See copies of correspondence in NGA curatorial files.)

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