National Gallery of Art - THE COLLECTION
image of Cathedral of Saint John at 's-Hertogenbosch Pieter Jansz Saenredam (artist)
Dutch, 1597 - 1665
Cathedral of Saint John at 's-Hertogenbosch, 1646
oil on panel
overall: 128.9 x 87 cm (50 3/4 x 34 1/4 in.) framed: 168.3 x 127 cm (66 1/4 x 50 in.)
Samuel H. Kress Collection
1961.9.33
On View
From the Tour: Dutch Landscapes and Seascapes of the 1600s
Object 8 of 8

Provenance

Possibly Pierre Daguerre, Bayonne and Amsterdam, in the early eighteenth century; possibly by inheritance to his daughter, Marie-Anne Daguerre Harader, Itxassou, near Bayonne, mid-18th century; parish church, Itxassou;[1] (D.A. Hoogendijk, Amsterdam), by 1937.[2] J.A.G. Sandberg, Wassenaar; (Wildenstein & Co., New York); sold February 1954 to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New York;[3] gift 1961 to NGA.

[1] This early provenance was provided by Robert Poupel, Cambo-les-bains, France (letter, 13 June 1970, in NGA curatorial files). He writes that during the seventeenth century Bayonne carried on a thriving sea trade with the Netherlands. Pierre Daguerre, who married Elisabeth de Papenbroeck, the daughter of one of the Dutch settlers in Bayonne, lived for a period in Amsterdam where he acted as the "King's agent in the City of Amsterdam." Poupel believes that Daguerre purchased the painting and then passed it to his daughter Marie-Anne Daguerre. In the 1720s she married Jacques de Harader, squire of Lassale-Vignolles, who owned extensive landed estates at nearby Itxassou. Although no written records exist, he believes that the Daguerre-Harader couple presented the painting to the local parish church.

[2] The painting was lent by Hoogendijk to the 1937-1938 exhibition held in Rotterdam and Amsterdam.

[3] The bill of sale (copy in NGA curatorial files) is dated 10 February 1954, and was for fourteen paintings, including Saenredam's Interior of St. John's Cathedral at Bois-le-Duc; payments by the Foundation continued to March 1957.

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