National Gallery of Art - THE COLLECTION
image of Portrait of Lorenzo di Credi Pietro Perugino (painter)
Umbrian, c. 1450 - 1523
Portrait of Lorenzo di Credi, 1488
oil on panel transferred to canvas
original panel: 44 x 30.5 cm (17 5/16 x 12 in.) overall (with added border): 46 x 32.5 cm (18 1/8 x 12 13/16 in.) framed: 63.8 x 50.8 x 5.7 cm (25 1/8 x 20 x 2 1/4 in.)
Widener Collection
1942.9.38
Not on View
From the Tour: Portrait Painting in Florence in the Later 1400s
Object 4 of 6

Provenance

Probably private collections, Florence, until at least the mid-eighteenth century. possibly anonymous collection, Rome, before 1895.[1] William Beattie, Glasgow, Scotland, by 1901.[2] (Arthur J. Sulley & Co., London); sold 16 January 1911 to Peter A.B. Widener, Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania;[3] inheritance from Estate of Peter A.B. Widener by gift through power of appointment of Joseph E. Widener, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania; gift 1942 to NGA.

[1] A red wax customs seal still on the back of the panel reads "DIREZ DELLA R. DOGANA DI FIRENZE"; the "R." which stands for "Reale" ("Royal"), suggests that the painting was cleared for export under the Hapsburg-Lorraine regents. The possibility of a Roman provenance is mentioned in Widener curator Edith Standen's notes (in NGA curatorial files).

Though it was preserved and attached to the stretcher of the present canvas, the inscribed section of the panel unfortunately disappeared sometime after it was re-examined in connection with the Gallery's summary catalogue of 1965. To judge from a photograph made at that time, the inscription, partly in Roman capitals and partly in cursive script, does not appear to have been contemporary with the painting; it probably dated from the sixteenth century. Written over the inscription was the inventory number 6A.

[2] He lent the painting to a 1901 exhibition in London.

[3] According to Widener collection cards, in NGA curatorial files.

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