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Provenance

The sitter [1840-1916]; his neighbor, George Meyers, New York; Alfred M. Turner, New York, from c. 1894; sold 20 January 1919 to Thomas B. Clarke [1848-1931], New York;[1] his estate; sold as part of the Clarke collection 29 January 1936, through (M. Knoedler & Co., New York), to The A.W. Mellon Educational and Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh; gift 1942 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1926
A Loan Exhibition of Paintings by Early American Portrait Painters, The Century Association, New York, 1926, no. 9.
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928-1931, unnumbered and unpaginated catalogue.
1938
Paintings by Frank Duveneck, 1848-1919, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1938, no. 34.
1943
American Paintings, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1943.
1953
American Paintings from the Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1953.
1955
American Paintings from the Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1955.
1956
American Paintings from the Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1956.
1970
Two Centuries of American Portraits, University of Kentucky Art Gallery, Lexington; Paducah Art Gallery, Kentucky; J. B. Speed Museum of Art, Louisville, 1970, no cat.
1988
An American Painter Abroad: Frank Duveneck's European Years, Cincinnati Art Museum, 1987-1988, unnumbered.
1989
Loan for display with permanent collection, The Taft Museum, Cincinnati, 1989-1990.
Bibliography
1928
Barker, Virgil. "Portraiture in America before 1876." The Arts 13, no. 5 (May 1928): 286.
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke. Exh. cat. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928, unnumbered.
1928
Sherman, Frederic Fairchild. "Frank Duveneck." Art in America 16 (February 1928): 97, repro.
1930
Sherman 1930, 61, repro. opp. 60.
1936
Exhibition of the Work of Frank Duveneck. Exh. cat. Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, 1936: 74.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 52, repro.
1970
Booth, Billy Ray. "A Survey of Portraiture and Figure Paintings by Frank Duveneck." Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1970: xiii, 118-120, repro.
1975
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. New York, 1975: 555, no. 844, color repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 148, repro.
1980
Wilmerding, John. American Masterpieces from the National Gallery of Art. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1980: 16, 132, repro.
1981
Williams, William James. A Heritage of American Paintings from the National Gallery of Art. New York, 1981: 179, repro.
1987
Quick, Michael. An American Painter Abroad: Frank Duveneck's European Years. Exh. cat. Cincinnati Art Musuem, Cincinnati, 1987: 41, 103, fig. 25.
1988
Wilmerding, John. American Masterpieces from the National Gallery of Art. Rev. ed. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1988: 19.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 164, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 154-156, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a coarse, double-threaded, plain-weave fabric that was relined in 1946, hiding a colormen's stencil reading "Malerleinwand Fabrik / von / A. Schutzman / in / M√úNCHEN." The ground is moderately thick and off-white; above it is a thinner white layer that is possibly a second ground. The paint was applied in multiple layers, using a wet-into-wet technique, and without pronounced impasto or brushwork. There are scattered small losses of paint and ground throughout the right shoulder and to the left of the sitter's face, and fairly extensive traction crackle. The thick varnish has discolored.