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Provenance

Hon. Marmaduke Constable-Maxwell [1806-1872], Terregles, Dumfriesshire (sale, Christie's, London, 1 March 1873, no. 132);[1] purchased by William Ward, 1st earl of Dudley [1817-1885, created earl 1860], Dudley House, London; (sale, Christie's, London, 25 June 1892, no. 51);[2] purchased by (Agnew's, London);[3] sold later the same year to Peter A.B. Widener, Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania; inheritance from Estate of Peter A.B. Widener by gift through power of appointment of Joseph E. Widener, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania; gift 1942 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1938
Tiepolo and His Contemporaries, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1938, no. 22, repro., as Campo di Santi Giovanni e Paolo.
2010
Venice: Canaletto and His Rivals, The National Gallery, London; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 2010-2011, no. 49, repro. (shown only in Washington).
Bibliography
1892
"Inventory of Paintings. P.A.B. Widener." Manuscript, Gallery Archives, National Gallery of Art, 1892: no. 5, as by Canaletto.
1908
"P.A.B. Widener Collection, February 1st, 1908." Typescript, 2 vols., Library, National Gallery of Art, 1908: 133, 174, repro., as by Canaletto.
1916
Berenson, Bernard, and William Roberts. Pictures in the Collection of P.A.B. Widener at Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania: Early Italian and Spanish Schools. Philadelphia, 1916: unpaginated, repro., as A View in Venice by Canaletto.
1923
Paintings in the Collection of Joseph Widener at Lynnewood Hall. Intro. by Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, 1923: unpaginated, repro., as A View in Venice by Canaletto.
1926
Marillier, H. C. Christie's 1766 to 1925. London, 1926: 66, 67.
1931
Paintings in the Collection of Joseph Widener at Lynnewood Hall. Intro. by Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, 1931: 224, repro., as A View in Venice by Canaletto.
1938
Frankfurter, Alfred M. "Tiepolo comes to New York: The XVIII Century Venetians at the Metropolitan." Art News 36 (12 March): 23-24, as by Canaletto.
1938
Williams, Jr., Hermann W. "Tiepolo and His Contemporaries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 33 (1938): 65, repro. 63, as by Canaletto.
1942
Works of Art from the Widener Collection. Foreword by David Finley and John Walker. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 5.
1948
Paintings and Sculpture from the Widener Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1948 (reprinted 1959): 26, repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1948
Parker, Karl T. The Drawings of Antonio Canaletto in the Collection of His Majesty the King at Windsor Castle. London, 1948: 37, no. 40, as by Canaletto.
1951
Einstein, Lewis. Looking at Italian Pictures in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, 1951: 108-113, repro., as by Canaletto.
1957
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Comparisons in Art: A Companion to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. London, 1957 (reprinted 1959): pl. 158, as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1960
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Later Italian Painting in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, D.C., 1960 (Booklet Number Six in Ten Schools of Painting in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.): 38, color repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1960
The National Gallery of Art and Its Collections. Foreword by Perry B. Cott and notes by Otto Stelzer. National Gallery of Art, Washington (undated, 1960s): 6, as View of Venice by Canaletto.
1962
Cairns, Huntington, and John Walker, eds., Treasures from the National Gallery of Art, New York, 1962: 48, color repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1962
Constable, William George. Canaletto: Giovanni Antonio Canal, 1697-1768. 2 vols. Oxford, 1962: 2:318-319, no. 307, as by Canaletto.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 22, as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1966
Cairns, Huntington, and John Walker, eds. A Pageant of Painting from the National Gallery of Art. 2 vols. New York, 1966: 2:330, color repro., as View in Venice, by Canaletto
1967
Pignatti, Terisio. "Bernardo Bellotto's Venetian Period (1738-1743)." The National Gallery of Canada Bulletin 9-10 (1967): 1.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 15, repro., as View in Venice, by Canaletto
1968
Puppi, Lionello. The Complete Paintings of Canaletto. Milan, 1968: 101, repro., no. 110B, as by Canaletto.
1972
Fredericksen, Burton B., and Federico Zeri. Census of Pre-Nineteenth Century Italian Paintings in North American Public Collections. Cambridge, Mass., 1972: 43, as by Canaletto.
1972
Kozakiewicz, Stefan. Bernardo Bellotto. Translated by Mary Whittal. 2 vols. Greenwich, Connecticut, 1972: 2:449, no. Z 256, as possibly by Canaletto with assistance from Bellotto.
1974
Camesasca, Ettore. L'opera completa del Bellotto. Milan, 1974: 88, no. 5 A.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 52, repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1976
Constable and Links 1976, 1:pl. 202; 2:339-340, no. 307, as by Canaletto.
1979
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Catalogue of the Italian Paintings. 2 vols. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1979: I:99-101, II:pl. 67, as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1979
Watson, Ross. The National Gallery of Art, Washington. New York, 1979: 83, pl. 71.
1984
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Rev. ed. New York, 1984: 346, no. 479, color repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1985
Corboz, André. Canaletto: Una Venezia immaginaria. Catalogue compiled by Anna Tortorelo. 2 vols. Milan, 1985: 2:631, repro., no. P 221, as by Canaletto.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 71, repro., as View in Venice by Canaletto.
1989
Constable, W. G. Canaletto: Giovanni Antonio Canal, 1697-1765. 2nd ed. revised by J. G. Links, reissued with supplement and additional plates. 2 vols. Oxford, 1989: 1:pl. 202; 2:339-340, no. 307, as by Canaletto.
1996
De Grazia, Diane, and Eric Garberson, with Edgar Peters Bowron, Peter M. Lukehart, and Mitchell Merling. Italian Paintings of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 9-14, color repro. 11.
2004
Hand, John Oliver. National Gallery of Art: Master Paintings from the Collection. Washington and New York, 2004: 238, no. 188, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a coarse, open plain-weave fabric of irregular thread size and weave that was lined at an unknown date prior to acquisition. The ground is a medium-thick red layer upon which a thinner, pale yellow layer has been applied. The paint is a rich vehicular paste applied more thinly in the lights than in the darks. The brilliant blue sky was laid in first, and then clearly defined clouds were applied in heavier impasto. Next the architecture and foreground were painted with smaller brushes; broad darks and lights were laid in first and modified with halftones applied with little blending. Mechanical aids were used to incise guidelines for the architecture and perspective and the medallions on the base of the Colleoni monument. Linear details of the buildings in sunlight were incised with a straight edge into the wet paint, revealing the pale yellow layer beneath. Linear details in the shadows were painted in black with an extremely fine brush. The figures, boats, and other details in the foreground were applied upon the completed understructure.

Dark, foreboding clouds in the center of the composition originally imparted a different mood to the scene. The artist evidently changed his mind during the painting process and applied a light blue layer of sky over the dark clouds, traces of which appear on top of the clouds and be low the edges of the architecture. This light blue layer was partially removed during an early treatment, although the restorer, apparently realizing his mistake, subsequently overpainted most of the sky, including the exposed dark clouds and the large white cloud just above it. This layer of paint is insoluble to some degree, and remnants of nonoriginal paint remain throughout the sky in the crevices of the surface texture.

The original tacking margins have been removed, but the cusping along all four edges suggests that the painting approximates its original dimensions. The foreground and architecture are in good condition with minor abrasion of the uppermost paint layer that has affected the dark glazes in particular. Inpainting of the sky is extensive owing to the severe abrasion and a large oval loss at the center. Discolored varnish and overpaint were removed in a treatment begun in 1983-1984 by Jia-sun Tsang. The picture was inpainted and the treatment completed by Susanna P. Griswold in 1993.