Overview

No overview available.

Inscription

Marks and Labels

null

Provenance

The artist's studio; acquired c. 1823 by Charles William Stewart (later Vane), 3rd marquess of Londonderry [1778-1854], Londonderry House, London;[1] by inheritance to his son, Frederick William Robert Vane, 4th marquess of Londonderry [1805-1872], Londonderry House; by inheritance to his half-brother, George Henry Robert Charles William Vane-Tempest, 5th marquess of Londonderry [1821-1884], Londonderry House; by inheritance to his son, Charles Stewart Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 6th marquess of Londonderry [1852-1915]; by inheritance to his son, Charles Stewart Henry Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th marquess of Londonderry [1878-1949], Londonderry House; his estate; (sale, Sotheby's, London, 16 November 1962, no. 34); purchased by M. Comer for Lillian R. Berkman [Mrs. Jack N. Berkman, formerly Mrs. Marc B. Rojtman, 1922-2001], New York; her estate; bequest 2003 to NGA.

Exhibition History
Bibliography
1970
Phillips, John Goldsmith. “Canova’s Reclining Naiad.”Metropolitan Museum Bulletin 29 (Summer 1970): 1-10, esp. 9-10.
1972
Bassi, Elena. Antonio Canova a Possagno. Catalogo delle opera. Guida alla visita della Gipsoteca, Casa e Tempio. Treviso, 1972:99, mistakenly assuming that the version made for Lord Darnley, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is identical with the present version, acquired from Canova’s studio by the Marquess of Londonderry.
1976
Pavanello, Giuseppe, and Mario Praz. L'opera completa di Canova. Milan, 1976: 126, no. 279, mistakenly assuming that the version made for Lord Darnley, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is identical with the present version, acquired from Canova’s studio by the Marquess of Londonderry.
2004
Gopnik, Blake. "A Very Full Week at the National Gallery: Five Full Days of Permanent Pleasure." The Washington Post (December 27, 2004): C1, C2, repro.
Technical Summary