Provenance

Martelli family, Florence; sold 28 June 1916 through (Giuseppe Salvadori, Florence) and (French & Company, New York) to Joseph E. Widener; inheritance from Estate of Peter A.B. Widener by gift through power of appointment of Joseph E. Widener, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, after purchase by funds of Joseph E. Widener;[1] gift 1942 to NGA.

Bibliography
1904
Schottmüller, Frida. Donatello, ein Beitrag zum Verständnis seiner künstlerischen Tat. Munich, 1904: 124.
1916
Marquand, Allan. "The Martelli David and the Youthful St. John Baptist." Art in America 4, no. 6 (October 1916): 358-366, fig. 2.
1916
Sirén, Osvald. "Two Florentine Sculptures Sold to America." The Burlington Magazine 29, no. 161 (August 1961): 197-199, pl. C.
1942
Works of Art from the Widener Collection. Foreword by David Finley and John Walker. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 9, as by Antonio Rossellino.
1948
Paintings and Sculpture from the Widener Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1948 (reprinted 1959): 119, repro., as by Antonio Rossellino.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 170, as by Antonio Rossellino.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 150, repro., as by Antonio Rossellino.
1994
Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1994: 211, repro., as by Antonio Rossellino.
2007
Desiderio da Settignano: Sculptor of Renaissance Florence. Exh. cat. Musée du Louvre, Paris; Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Milan, 2007: 140, fig. 92.
2007
Pisani, Linda. "San Giovannino Battista nei busti del Rinascimento Florentino." In Jeanette Kohl and Rebecca Müller, eds. Kopf/Bild: Die Büste in Mittelalter und Frïher Neuzeit. (I Mandorli 6) Munich and Berlin, 2007: 231, no. 136.