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Provenance

(Bourgeois Frères, Cologne), before 1922;[1] purchased 1922 by Joseph Widener, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, as French, c. 1290; inheritance from the Estate of Peter A. B. Widener by gift through power of appointment of Joseph E. Widener, after purchase by funds of the Estate, 1942.

Exhibition History
1937
Master Bronzes Selected from Museums and Collections in America, The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Albright Art Gallery, 1937, no. 114, repro., as French (Tournai), c. 1290.
Bibliography
1935
Inventory of the Objects d'Art at Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, The Estate of the Late P.A.B. Widener. Philadelphia, 1935: 31.
1937
Davis, Robert Tyler. "An Odyssey of Bronze Statuettes," Art News 35 (6 February 1937): 13.
1937
Master Bronzes Selected from Museums and Collections in America. Exh. cat. The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, 1937: no. 114.
1937
Washburn, Gordon B. "Master Bronzes at Buffalo," Magazine of Art 30 (February 1937): 94, repro.
1942
Works of Art from the Widener Collection. Foreword by David Finley and John Walker. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 9, as Flemish (Tournai) 13th Century.
1993
Distelberger, Rudolf, Alison Luchs, Philippe Verdier, and Timonthy H. Wilson. Western Decorative Arts, Part I: Medieval, Renaissance, and Historicizing Styles including Metalwork, Enamels, and Ceramics. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1993: 54-57, repro. 55.
Technical Summary

The bronze is in generally good condition except for wear to the gilding and some cracks in the figure's back, apparently casting flaws. A metal strip about 1 cm wide, pierced by two holes, is soldered across the open bottom, apparently as a means for attaching the sculpture to a base.

X-ray fluorescence analysis indicated that the alloy consists of unusually pure copper with a very small amount of tin, probably less than 5 percent.[1] Traces of silver (possibly in the gilding) and iron but no lead or zinc were detected. The presence of mercury indicates that the object is fire gilded.

[1] Barbara Miller, conservation scientist, report in conversation 31 August 1983.