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Provenance

Achillito Chiesa, Milan, before 1924.[1] (Count Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Florence);[2] purchased 1932 by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New York;[3] gift 1939 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1940
Masterpieces of Art. European & American Paintings 1500-1900, New York World's Fair, 1940, no. 29, repro., as The Bridge with Three Arches.
1994
The Glory of Venice: Art in the Eighteenth Century, Royal Academy of Arts, London; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Museo del Settecento Veneziano - Ca'Rezzonico, Venice, 1994-1995, no. 213 (London and Washington), no. 83 (Venice), repro.
Bibliography
1932
Frankfurter, Alfred M. "Eighteenth Century Venice in a New York Collection." The Fine Arts 19 (December 1932): 10, repro. p. 9.
1941
Preliminary Catalogue of Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1941: 93, no. 224, as View on the Cannareggio, Venice.
1942
Book of Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 244, repro. 124, as View on the Cannareggio, Venice.
1944
Frankfurter, Alfred M. The Kress Collection in the National Gallery. New York, 1944: 60, repro.
1944
Goering, Max. Francesco Guardi. Vienna, 1944: 51, fig. 98.
1945
Paintings and Sculpture from the Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1945 (reprinted 1947, 1949): 148, repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1952
Berenson, Bernard. Italian Painters of the Renaissance. 3rd edition. Oxford, 1952: 34, pl. 102. (Reprinted 1980)
1952
Cairns, Huntington, and John Walker, eds., Great Paintings from the National Gallery of Art. New York, 1952: 76, color repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1952
Moschini, Vittorio. Francesco Guardi. Milan, 1952: 22, fig. 142.
1953
Ragghianti, Carlo. "Epiloghi guardeschi." Pisa. Scuola normale superiore. Annali: lettere, storia e filosofia, ser. 2, 22 (1953): 101.
1956
Moschini, Vittorio. Francesco Guardi. Milan, 1956: 34, fig. 144.
1959
Paintings and Sculpture from the Samuel H. Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1959: 259, repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 64, as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1966
Cairns, Huntington, and John Walker, eds. A Pageant of Painting from the National Gallery of Art. 2 vols. New York, 1966: 2:334, color repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 56, repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1972
Fredericksen, Burton B., and Federico Zeri. Census of Pre-Nineteenth Century Italian Paintings in North American Public Collections. Cambridge, Mass., 1972: 97.
1973
Morassi, Antonio. Guardi: Antonio e Francesco Guardi. 2 vols. Venice, 1973-1975: 1:249, 418, no. 577; 2:fig. 546.
1973
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Paintings from the Samuel H. Kress Collection: Italian Schools, XVI-XVIII Century. London, 1973: 171-172, fig. 329.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 166, repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1979
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Catalogue of the Italian Paintings. 2 vols. Washington, 1979: I:236-237, II:pl. 159, as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 192, repro., as View on the Cannaregio, Venice.
1994
The Glory of Venice. Exh. cat. Royal Academy of Arts, London; National Gallery of Art, Washington; Museo del Settecento Veneziano - Ca'Rezzonico, Venice; Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice, 1994-1995: no. 213, 459, cat. 212, color pl. 316..
1996
De Grazia, Diane, and Eric Garberson, with Edgar Peters Bowron, Peter M. Lukehart, and Mitchell Merling. Italian Paintings of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 121-125, repro. 123.
Technical Summary

The support is a coarse, plain-weave fabric prepared with a gritty, thinly applied dark red ground. The surface composition was painted directly (without an isolating layer) over a preexisting composition consisting of white scrollwork and flowers painted on a beige background. In x-radiographs these elements appear to have been loosely executed as in a sketch and form the left end of a larger decorative panel. Losses in the underlying paint layer were filled before the surface composition was applied. The surface paint was applied thinly, except in the whites and highlights, which show a somewhat thicker buildup of paint. Pigment analysis using polarized light microscopy found ultramarine ash, vermilion, red lake, van dyke brown, yellow ocher, charcoal black, lead white, chalk, and quartz.[1]

The tacking margins have been removed, but cusping is visible on the left and right, or the top and bottom of the first composition. The surface is abraded and small paint losses are scattered throughout. Pitting of the paint layer may be due to excessive heat during a lining or loss of large pigment particles. The underlying design shows through slightly in the sky due to abrasion and craquelure and the increased transparency of the upper paint layer, but this effect was minimized through inpainting in 1984 during the conservation treatment by Elizabeth Steele. The painting was relined, discolored varnish was removed, and the painting was restored by Stephen Pichetto in 1934. The varnish is clear.

[1] Elizabeth Steele, Analytical Report of 17 August 1984, NGA curatorial files.