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Provenance

Sir George Kane, London.[1] (Count Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Rome); purchased 1933 by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New York; gift 1939 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1932
An Exhibition of Italian Paintings Lent by Mr. Samuel H. Kress of New York to Museums, Colleges, and Art Associations, travelling exhibition, 24 venues, 1932-1935, mostly unnumbered catalogues, p. 55 or p. 35, repro. (not shown at all venues).
1938
Exhibition of Venetian Painting from the Fifteenth Century through the Eighteenth Century, California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, 1938, no. 31, repro., as Campo di Santi Giovanni E. Paolo, Venice.
1938
Tiepolo and His Contemporaries, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1938, no. 26, repro., as Campo di Santi Giovanni e Paolo.
1939
Masterpieces of Art. European Paintings and Sculpture from 1300-1800, New York World's Fair, 1939, no. 167, repro.
1940
Exhibition of Eighteenth-Century Italian Landscape Painting and Its Influence in England, Gallery of Fine Arts, Yale University, New Haven, 1940, no. 14 (cat. in Bulletin of the Associates in Fine Arts at Yale University 9 [1940], frontispiece).
2010
From La Serenissima to the Eternal City: The Grand Tour in 18th Century Venice and Rome, The Mitchell Gallery, St. John's College, Annapolis, 2010, no catalogue.
Bibliography
1941
Preliminary Catalogue of Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1941: 93, no. 240, as Campo San Zanipolo.
1942
Book of Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 244, repro. 125, as Campo San Zanipolo.
1944
Goering, Max. Francesco Guardi. Vienna, 1944: 62.
1945
Paintings and Sculpture from the Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1945 (reprinted 1947, 1949): 150, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1946
Favorite Paintings from the National Gallery of Art Washington, D.C.. New York, 1946: 37-39, color repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1951
Einstein, Lewis. Looking at Italian Pictures in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, 1951: 112-113, repro.
1953
Schwarz, Heinrich. "A Painting by Francesco Guardi." Rhode Island School of Design, Museum Notes 10 (1953): unpaginated.
1957
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Comparisons in Art: A Companion to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. London, 1957 (reprinted 1959): pl. 159, as Campo San Zanipolo.
1959
Paintings and Sculpture from the Samuel H. Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1959: 260, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1960
Newton, Eric. The Arts of Man. Greenwich, Connecticut, 1960: 199-201, repro.
1960
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Later Italian Painting in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, D.C., 1960 (Booklet Number Six in Ten Schools of Painting in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.): 40, color repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1961
Walker, John, Guy Emerson, and Charles Seymour. Art Treasures for America: An Anthology of Paintings and Sculpture in the Samuel H. Kress Collection. London, 1961: 172, fig. 163-164.
1963
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. New York, 1963 (reprinted 1964 in French, German, and Spanish): 318, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 64, as Campo San Zanipolo.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 56, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1968
Watson, Ross. "Guardi and the Visit of Pius VI to Venice in 1782." Report and Studies in the History of Art 2 (1968-69): 114-131, repro.
1972
Fredericksen, Burton B., and Federico Zeri. Census of Pre-Nineteenth Century Italian Paintings in North American Public Collections. Cambridge, Mass., 1972: 97.
1973
Morassi, Antonio. Guardi: Antonio e Francesco Guardi. 2 vols. Venice, 1973-1975: 1:360, no. 270; 2:fig. 302.
1973
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Paintings from the Samuel H. Kress Collection: Italian Schools, XVI-XVIII Century. London, 1973: 172-174, fig. 330 and frontispiece.
1974
Rossi Bortolatto, Luigina. L'opera completa di Francesco Guardi. Milan, 1974: 131, no. 699, repro.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 166, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1975
Morassi, Antonio. Tutti i disegni di Antonio, Francesco e Giacomo Guardi. Venice, 1975: 126.
1977
Byam Shaw, James. "Some Guardi Drawings Rediscovered." MD 15 (1977): 10.
1979
Shapley, Fern Rusk. Catalogue of the Italian Paintings. 2 vols. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1979: I:237-240, II:pl. 160, as Campo San Zanipolo.
1979
Watson, Ross. The National Gallery of Art, Washington. New York, 1979: 83, pl. 72.
1984
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Rev. ed. New York, 1984: 348, no. 486, color repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 192, repro., as Campo San Zanipolo.
1993
Succi, Dario. Francesco Guardi. Milan, 1993: 112, fig. 114.
1996
De Grazia, Diane, and Eric Garberson, with Edgar Peters Bowron, Peter M. Lukehart, and Mitchell Merling. Italian Paintings of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 125-130, color repro. 127.
2004
Hand, John Oliver. National Gallery of Art: Master Paintings from the Collection. Washington and New York, 2004: 240-241, no. 191, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a moderately fine, tightly woven, plain-weave fabric. In x-radiographs a fragment of an earlier floral composition is visible at the lower right. The orientation of the flowers and the cusping along the left edge suggest that the piece was cut from the upper right of a larger fabric. A reddish brown isolating layer serves as the ground for the surface composition. The paint was quite thinly applied, with only the whites being somewhat thicker. The cool tonality was produced in part by scumbling light colors over dark, in some cases directly over the ground. Dark brown glazes were used throughout as well as fine lines of black paint for the architectural detailing.

The tacking margins have been removed; the original fabric stops approximately 0.7 cm short of the stretcher. There is general, moderate abrasion, especially in the lower area of the sky, which allows the ground to show, making the sky appear darker than intended. The varnish is clear. The painting was relined, discolored varnish was removed, and the painting restored by Stephen Pichetto in 1934. Most recently, discolored varnish was removed and the painting was restored by Teresa Longyear in 1985-1987.