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Inscription

center left: C.L.E.

Provenance

Frederic A. Delano [1811-1857], son of the sitter, New York;[1] by descent in the Delano family, Fairhaven, Massachusetts, to the grandson of the sitter, Frederic A. Delano [1863-1953], Washington, D.C.;[2] gift 1942 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1852
Annual Exhibition, National Academy of Design, New York, 1852, no. 449, as Portrait of a Gentleman.
Bibliography
1852
"Exhibition of the National Academy of Design." Knickerbocker 39 (June 1852): 564.
1852
"Fine Arts." Home Journal 7 (8 May 1852): 2.
1852
"Fine Arts: The National Academy of Design." The Albion 2 (24 April/8 May 1852): 226.
1867
Tuckerman 1867, 302.
1942
Richardson, Edgar P. "Captain Warren Delano by Charles Loring Elliot." The Art Quarterly 5 (Autumn 1942): 349-351, repro. 350.
1944
Richardson, Edgar P. American Romantic Painting. New York, 1944: 15, 33, no. 130, repro.
1955
Schmidt, Philip F. "Charles Loring Elliott (1812-1868): American Portrait Painter." M.A. thesis, University of Minnesota, 1955: 39, 43, fig. 19.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 58, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 156, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 175, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 225-227, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a medium-weight, plain-weave fabric. It has been lined, but cusping is present along all four edges. Stenciled on the reverse of the original canvas is "WILLIAMS & STEVENS / 353 / BROADWAY / NEW-YORK."[1] The ground layer is thick, smooth, and white. Flesh tones are blended with a minimum of impasto, while the garments are painted thickly and opaquely. In the olive background, an appearance of a slight, swirling texture was created by a thin layer of glazing laid down over more thickly applied paint. Small losses and areas of inpainting occur in the sitter's hair, at his hairline, and on his coat. A tiny cut or puncture is evident in the upper left part of the background. The evenly applied varnish is heavy and has discolored.

[1] The original stencil mark, now concealed, was copied on to the reverse of the new lining fabric.