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Inscription

upper left: 1529 / .NK. (in monogram); reverse, a resinous seal bearing a coat-of-arms

Provenance

Madame de L. de L., Paris; (her sale, Théodore Fischer, Lucerne [with A. Mak, Amsterdam], 27 July 1926, no. 139, as Nicolas Kirberger).[1] Otto B. Schuster, Amsterdam; (sale, Sotheby's, London, 15 July 1931, no. 109, as Master N.K.); Means. Mrs. Jacob H. Schiff; (her sale, American Art Association-Anderson Galleries, New York, 7-9 December 1933, no. 77, as Hans Kirberger [?], bought in [?]).[2] (Dr. Siegfried F. Aram, New York);[3] sold to Mrs. Ralph Harman Booth [Mary Batterman Booth, d. 1951], Grosse Pointe, Michigan, by 1938; gift 1947 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1939
Masterpieces of Art. European Paintings and Sculpture from 1300-1800, New York World's Fair, 1939, no. 207.
Bibliography
1936
A Portrait of A Nobleman by Niclaus Kremer. New York, 1936: unpaginated, repro.
1936
Kuhn, Charles L. A Catalogue of German Paintings of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in American Collections. Cambridge, Mass., 1936: 94, no. 449.
1938
Wescher, Paul. "Nicolas Kremer of Strassburg." The Art Quarterly 1 (1938): 204, 208.
1948
Recent Additions to the Ralph and Mary Booth Collection. Washington, 1948: unpaginated, repro.
1950
"Old Masters in America: Important Gifts to the National Gallery, Washington" The Illustrated London News (September 16, 1950): 449, repro.
1959
Hans Baldung Grien. Exh. cat. Staatliche Kunsthalle, Karlsruhe, 1959: 123. (The NGA portrait was not in the exhibition.)
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 72, no. 898.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture: Illustrations (Companion to the Summary Catalogue, 1965). Washington, 1968: 63, no. 898, repro.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 155, no. 172, repro.
1975
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. New York, 1975: 155, no. 172, color repro. (In rev. ed. Washington 1985, 155, no. 166, color repro.)
1984
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Rev. ed. New York, 1984: 155, no. 156, color repro.
1985
Butts, Barbara Rosalyn. "'Dürerschüler' Hans Süss von Kulmbach." Ph.D. dissertation, Harvard University, Cambridge, 1985: 147, 200-204, fig. 146.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 217, repro.
1990
Grimm, Claus, and Bernd Konrad. Die Fürstenberg Sammlungen Donaueschingen. Altdeutsche und schweizerische Malerei des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts. Munich, 1990: 200, under no. 51, fig. 51.1.
1993
Hand, John Oliver, with the assistance of Sally E. Mansfield. German Paintings of the Fifteenth through Seventeenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, 1993: 115-119, color repro. 117.
1995
Löcher, Kurt. Review of German Paintings of the Fifteenth through Seventeenth Centuries, by John Oliver Hand with the assistance of Sally E. Mansfield. Kunstchronik 43 no. 1 (January 1995): 17-18.
Technical Summary

The panel is composed of three boards with vertically oriented grain. The dendrochronological examination by Peter Klein yielded information only from the center board and provided a felling date of 1493 +6/-4. Examination with infrared reflectography revealed underdrawing, probably applied with a brush in a liquid medium, in the curtain folds and the landscape and in the hands. Several changes are visible in the x-radiograph; the sitter's right hand was originally slightly more to the left, and the left hand was placed parallel to it as if both were holding an object, such as a piece of paper. The right side of the face along the cheek and chin has been enlarged very slightly. Examination of the date and monogram did not disclose adulteration or inpainting. There are several checks in the wooden support running from the top edge along the vertical grain, and the panel has been attacked by worms in several locations, notably the left and right edges. There is retouching throughout, but the greatest concentration of loss and subsequent retouching occurs in the sitter's face and along the checks. An edge of white ground has been left around the sides, presumably to accommodate the frame, but the two vertical edges and the top left and right corners have been reworked using a material denser than the original ground.