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Inscription

falsely inscribed, on label pasted onto stretcher in ink: Ann Sinclair Crommelin Aet 34 / Evert Duyckinck Pinx. / G. Ver Planck

Provenance

(Rose M. [Mrs. Augustus] de Forest, New York); sold 8 April 1922 to Thomas B. Clarke [1848-1931], New York, as a portrait of Ann Sinclair Crommelin by Evert Duyckinck III;[1] sold by Clarke's executors to (M. Knoedler & Co., New York), from whom it was purchased 29 January 1936, as part of the Clarke collection, by The A.W. Mellon Educational and Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh; gift to NGA, 1947.

Exhibition History
1923
Exhibition of Portraits by Early American Portrait Painters, The Union League Club, New York, 1923, no. 2, as Ann Sinclair Crommelin by Evert Duyckinck 3rd.
1925
A Loan Exhibition of the Earliest Known Portraits of Americans Painted in This Country by Painters of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, The Century Association, New York, 1925, no. 7, as Ann Sinclair Crommelin by Evert Duyckinck, 3rd.
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928-1931, unnumbered and unpaginated catalogue, as Ann Sinclair Crommelin by Evert Duyckinck,3rd.
Bibliography
1932
Sherman, Frederick Fairchild. Early American Painting. New York and London, 1932: 12.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 170, repro., as by European of Unknown Nationality.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 307, as by Unknown [Formerly Considered American].
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 410, repro., as by Unknown Nationality 18th Century.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 294-295, repro. 294.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is plain woven; it has been lined. The ground is warm light brown, composed largely of white lead, and scraped on irregularly with a knife. The painting is executed smoothly in the flesh tones and background, broadly and roughly in the costume. The paint surface is severely abraded and extensively repainted; notably, the background has been completely restored, the form, texture, and highlights of the hair are repaint, and the folds of the blue shawl are heavily reinforced. The moderately thick natural resin varnish has discolored slightly.