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Provenance

The artist, New York. (sale, Anderson Galleries, New York, 26 November 1920, no. 91); Thomas B. Clarke [1848-1931], New York;[1] his estate; sold as part of the Clarke collection 29 January 1936, through (M. Knoedler & Co., New York), to The A.W. Mellon Educational and Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh; gift 1947 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1921
Exhibition of Paintings by Early American Portrait Painters, The Union League Club, New York, December 1921, no. 19.
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928-1931, unnumbered and unpaginated catalogue, as James Hall.
1967
Loan for display with permanent collection, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C., 1967-2000.
1972
The Lazzaroni: Science and Scientists in Mid-Nineteenth Century America, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C., 1972, p. 71.
Bibliography
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke. Exh. cat. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928, unnumbered.
1952
Rutledge and Lane 1952, 123.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 70, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 179, repro.
1987
Earth Sciences History 6, no. 1 (1987): repro. 1.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 208, repro.
1992
Romm, Sharon. The Changing Face of Beauty. St. Louis, 1992: 303, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 334-337, repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a medium-weight, plain-weave fabric. The painting remains unlined and is attached with tacks to the original four-member, half-mitered half-slip-joined stretcher. Stenciled on the reverse of the fabric is "Williams, Stevens, Williams & Co.... 353 Broadway New York." The tan-colored ground is thin and smooth. The paint was largely applied with a wet-into-wet technique in fairly free strokes. The painting is in fair condition, with little inpainting. There are minor tears scattered in the tacking edges. A larger mended tear, approximately 5.7 cm in length, is located at upper right. Throughout the surface there is a fine crackle pattern. The varnish is uneven and has become extremely discolored.