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Inscription

falsely signed, lower right at base of column in monogram: TS

Provenance

Possibly Mary B. Hazelhurst Mason. Acquired 24 February 1925 by Thomas B. Clarke [1848-1931], New York;[1] his estate; sold as part of the Clarke collection 29 January 1936, through (M. Knoedler & Co, New York), to The A.W. Mellon Educational and Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh; gift 1947 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1928
A Loan Exhibition of Paintings by Early American Portrait Painters, The Century Association, New York, 1928, no. 19, as by Thomas Sully.
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928-1931, unnumbered and unpaginated catalogue, as by Thomas Sully.
1971
Extended loan for use by The Supreme Court of the United States, Washington, D.C., 1971-1988.
1972
Extended loan for use in Chief Justice Rehnquist's chambers, 1986-1988.
1995
Extended loan for use by Ambassador Jeonnone Walker, U.S. Embassy residence, Prague, 1995-1998.
Bibliography
1928
Portraits by Early American Artists of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Collected by Thomas B. Clarke. Exh. cat. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1928, unnumbered, as by Thomas Sully.
1969
Beal, Rebecca J. Jacob Eichholtz, 1776-1842. Philadelphia, 1969: no. 337, 105.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 56, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 153, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 172, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 211-213, repro.
Technical Summary

A white ground of medium thickness was applied over the fairly rough, medium-weight, plain-weave fabric support. The painting has been lined. The paint was somewhat thinly applied but varies considerably, appearing very fluid in some areas and lean and particulate in others. The modeling of the sitter's hands, blended wet-into-wet, left a smooth surface, while brushwork is more visible in other areas of flesh such as the chest. The paint is in poor condition in much of the background and in the lowest areas of the sitter's dress, where it appears worn and there are scattered losses. These areas have been heavily inpainted. There are two inpainted lines of damage along the sleeve, another through the sitter's right temple and mouth, and many smaller inpainted damages scattered throughout the painting. The varnish is thick and has become considerably discolored.