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Provenance

Probably from a convent in the province of Guipuzcoa, Spain.[1] (Arthur J. Sulley, London);[2] (Count Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Rome), by 1926;[3] purchased April 1927 by Samuel H. Kress [1863-1955], New York;[4] gift 1952 by exchange to NGA.

Bibliography
1951
Paintings and Sculpture from the Kress Collection Acquired by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation 1945-1951. Introduction by John Walker, text by William E. Suida. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1951: 184, no. 81, repro., as by Hispano-Dutch Master.
1959
Paintings and Sculpture from the Samuel H. Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1959: 319, repro., as by Hispano-Dutch Master.
1960
Evans, Grose. Spanish Painting in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, D.C., 1960 (Booklet Number Ten in Ten Schools of Painting in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.): 12, color repro., as by Hispano-Dutch Master.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 67, as Hispano-Dutch School.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture: Illustrations (Companion to the Summary Catalogue, 1965). Washington, 1968: 59, no. 1120, repro., as Hispano-Dutch School.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 174, repro., as Hispano-Dutch School.
1977
Eisler, Colin. Paintings from the Samuel H. Kress Collection: European Schools Excluding Italian. Oxford, 1977: 64-66, fig. 59, as The Epiphany by Master of the Kress Epiphany.
1984
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Rev. ed. New York, 1984: 125, no. 109, color repro., as by Hispano-Dutch School.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 293, repro.
1986
Hand, John Oliver and Martha Wolff. Early Netherlandish Painting. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, 1986: 213-215, repro. 215.
Technical Summary

The paint and ground layers were transferred at an unknown date from a panel that had six vertical members, as is evident from traces of the joins still visible in raking light. The present canvas support has been relined. The type of wood making up the original panel is unknown, though a label affixed to the back of the frame states that it was "transferred from an oaken panel."[1] The painting has a smooth white ground with underdrawing to which the painted design conforms quite precisely.

The painting is in good condition. There are some areas of loss and abrasion, particularly at the edges and along the former joins in the panel, in the blue cloak of the Virgin and the area around her head, especially her veil, and in the right wall of the shed, as well as numerous tiny losses throughout. The old inpainting has discolored in these areas.

[1] The label reads: "PP-A2 - a picture representing The Adoration of the Maggi [sic]. An early painting attributed to the Dutch School, said to be painted not later than 1480. Transferred from an oaken panel. From a convent in Spain. Contini - New York, 4-6-1927. $EM, NxN."