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Inscription

possibly by unknown hand, on reverse: Joseph Leman / 5th Year / Adelia Leman / 1880

Provenance

Leman family, Lancaster, Pennsylvania; by descent to Adelia Leman [1857-1947], Lancaster, grandniece of the artist.[1] Acquired, likely purchased from Adelia Leman's estate, in 1948 by Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, New York, and Cambridge, Maryland; gift 1953 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1912
Loan Exhibition of Historical and Contemporary Portraits Illustrating the Evolution of Portraiture in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania..., Woolworth Building, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1912, no. 156b.
1943
Jacob Eichholtz, 1776-1842, American Artist, Philadelphia Art Alliance, 1943, no. 22.
2003
The Worlds of Jacob Eichholtz, Portrait Painter of the Early Republic, shown at one of three simultaneous venues: Lancaster County Historical Society, Pennsylvania, uunnumbered catalogue, repro.
Bibliography
1913
Hensel, William U. "Jacob Eichholtz, Painter." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 37 (1913): 69.
1960
Milley, John Calvin. "Jacob Eichholtz, 1776-1842." Master's thesis, University of Delaware, 1960: 307.
1969
Beal, Rebecca J. Jacob Eichholtz, 1776-1842. Philadelphia, 1969: 134, repro. 281.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 56, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 154, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 171, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 201, repro. 202.
Technical Summary

The support is a vertically grained yellow poplar panel (0.3 cm thick), over which a slightly off-white ground was applied in sweeping vertical strokes. The oval occupied by the portrait is marked by a thin line of deep reddish brown paint. Inside the oval, the background paint appears to have been laid in first, leaving space for the boy and the bird in reserve. The technique is wet-into-wet. Only the white of the collar and the buttons retains texture. The face is badly abraded. Inpainting has compensated for the thinness of paint in the face and is lightly scattered elsewhere. The painting was last treated in 1948, when discolored varnish was removed from the front and a wax coating was applied to the reverse of the panel. The varnish has not discolored.