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Provenance

The artist, Deerfield, Massachusetts; his estate until 1911;[1] his wife, Agnes Gordon Higginson Fuller [1838-1924], Deerfield, Massachusetts; her son, Arthur Negus Fuller [d. 1945], Deerfield, Massachusetts; his sister, Agnes Gordon Fuller Tack [Mrs. Augustus Vincent Tack], Deerfield, Massachusetts;[2] gift 1953 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1876
Possibly shown at Doll and Richards, Boston, 1876.
1884
Probably Memorial Exhibition of the Works of George Fuller, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1884, no. 128, as Portrait of a Lady.
Bibliography
1961
Homer, William Innes, and David M. Robb. "Paintings by George Fuller in American Museums and Public Collections." The Art Quarterly 24 (Autumn 1961): 294.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 62, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 165, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 185, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 236-238, repro.
Technical Summary

The painting is on a medium-weight, plain-weave fabric support that has been lined. Cusping is present along all four of the cut edges. The red, coarsely textured ground is thick and uneven. Subsequent paint, of a stiff consistency, was applied with a complex layering technique. Underlying colors (particularly in the hair) were exposed by scratching into the still-wet paint with a pointed object - probably the end of a brush handle. The paint layers are wrinkled throughout, and a broad crackle pattern has developed. The unevenly applied varnish has yellowed.