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Inscription

falsely signed and dated, lower left: JRL / 1848

Provenance

Charles A. Gould [d. 1926], Buffalo; his estate; (sale, American Art Association and Anderson Galleries, New York, 30-31 October 1929, no. 79);[1] Thomas B. Clarke [1848-1931], New York; his estate; sold as part of the Thomas B. Clarke collection 29 January 1936, through (M. Knoedler & Co., New York), to The A.W. Mellon Educational and Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh; gift 1954 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1954
Extended loan for use at the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., 1954-1980.
1982
Extended loan for use by Ambassador Arthur Hartmann, U.S. Embassy, Moscow, U.S.S.R., 1982-1987.
1989
Extended loan for use by Ambassador Maynard Glitman, U.S. Embassy residence, Brussels, Belgium, 1989-1991.
Bibliography
1938
O'Connor, John. "Reviewing a Forgotten Artist: A Sketch of James Reid Lambdin--the Pittsburgh Painter of American Statesmen." Carnegie Magazine 12 (1938): 115-118, repro. 118.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 78, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 192, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 225, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 404-406, repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a medium-weight, plain-weave fabric that has been lined. There appears to be a thin white ground layer. The background is thinly painted; the face and clothing are more thickly painted, particularly in the highlighted areas of the face and collar. There are scattered small losses in various areas and some craquelure. An old T-shape tear is located above the sitter's head. In 1948 the painting was relined, without removal of the surface coatings. The surface of the painting is covered with numerous layers of varnish, which are heavily discolored and cracked in some passages.