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Probably Édouard Kahn, Paris; (his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 8 June 1895, no. 2).[1] Sigismond Bardac, Paris; (sale, Paris, 1910). (Gimpel & Wildenstein, Paris), by 1924;[2] sold 1925 to Baron Maurice de Rothschild [d. 1957], Paris. Arthur Sachs [1880-1975], New York and Cannes, by 1928;[3] gift 1954 to NGA.

Exhibition History
Exposition d'art ancien espagnol, Hôtel J. Charpentier, Paris, 1925, 49, no. 41, repro.
Exhibition of Spanish Paintings from El Greco to Goya, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1928, 2, no. 6 fig. 6.
A Century of Progress Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture, The Art Institute of Chicago, 1933, 25, no. 162.
Obras Maestras de la National Gallery of Art de Washington, Museo Nacional de Antropología, Mexico City, 1996-1997, unnumbered catalogue, 88-89, color repro.
Lafond, Paul. Goya. Paris, 1902: 107, no. 29.
von Loga, Valerian. Francisco de Goya. Berlin, 1903: no. 547.
Calvert, Albert F. Goya: An Account of His Life and Works. London, 1908: 161, no. 143.
Stokes, Hugh. Francisco Goya. London, 1914: 352, no. 535.
Mayer, August L. Francisco de Goya. London and Toronto, 1924: 181, no. 666.
Trapier, Elizabeth du Gué. Eugenio Lucas y Padilla. New York, 1940: 48, pl. 24.
Lafuente Ferrari, Enrique. Antecedentes, coincidencias e influencias del arte de Goya. Madrid, 1947: 230-231.
Adhémar, Jean. Goya. New York, 1948: 22, pl. 111.
López-Rey, José. "Goya and His Pupil María del Rosario Weiss." Gazette des Beaux-Arts 47 (1956): 282.
Evans, Grose. Spanish Painting in the National Gallery of Art. Washington, D.C., 1960 (Booklet Number Ten in Ten Schools of Painting in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.): 40, color repro., as attributed to Goya.
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. New York, 1963 (reprinted 1964 in French, German, and Spanish): 321, repro., as attributed to Goya.
Gudiol y Ricart, José. Goya. New York, [c. 1965]: 164, color repro. 165.
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 61, as Attributed to Goya.
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 53, repro., as Attributed to Goya.
Shickel, Richard. The World of Goya, 1746-1828. (Time-Life Library of Art.) New York, 1968: 162-163, color ill. (Attributed to Goya.)
Gassier, Pierre, and Juliet Wilson. Vie et oeuvre de Francisco Goya. Paris, 1970: 356-357 (also English ed. 1971: 356-357).
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 160, repro., as Attributed to Goya.
Koella, Rudolf. Collection Oskar Reinhart. Neuchâtel, 1975: 346.
Glendinning, Nigel. Goya and His Critics. New Haven, 1977: 124, 321, n. 5, fig. 36.
Arnaiz, Manuel José. Eugenio Lucas. Su vida y su obra. Madrid, 1981: 474, no. 342, color repro. p. 101, no. 84.
Walker, John. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Rev. ed. New York, 1984: 404, no. 563, color repro., as Attributed to Francisco de Goya.
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 185, repro.
Brown, Jonathan, and Richard G. Mann. Spanish Paintings of the Fifteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1990: 88-91, color repro. 89.
Wilson-Bareau, Juliet. Entry for "Eugenio Lucas Villamil, zugeschrieben, Corrida." In Sammlung Oskar Reinhart 'Am Römerholz' Winterthur. Basel, 2003: no. 19, 174-177, repro.
Technical Summary

The picture is on a fabric of tight and regular weave and adhered to a fine lining material. All tacking edges have been removed. The ground consists of a rough layer of reddish brown particles over which rich oil paint has been applied with brush and palette knife. An examination of the pigments by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy did not reveal the use of any pigments unavailable to Goya, although chrome yellow, which is present, was only introduced in the early 1800s.[1] The paint and ground layers present evidence of a history of poor adhesion. Flake losses have occurred in the thick, knife-applied layers and at cracks near the outer extremities of the picture. There are fills and retouches applied to many of the flake losses. The surface coating is somewhat dull.

[1] Identified by optical microscopy.