Admission is always free Directions

Open today: 10:00 to 5:00

Provenance

Probably from the Campo Santo.[1] Stefano Bardini [1836-1922], Florence.[2] Prince Johan II of Liechtenstein [1840-1929], Vienna, by 1896; [3] Prince Franz I of Liechtenstein [1853-1938]; Prince Franz Josef II of Liechtenstein [1906-1989]; acquired 2 April 1953 by (J. Seligmann & Co., New York);[4] sold 1954 to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New York; gift 1960 to NGA.

Bibliography
1896
Bode, Wilhelm von. Die Fürstlich Leichtensteinsche Gemäldegalerie. Vienna, 1896: 130.
1949
Valentiner, Wilhelm. "Orcagna and the Black Death of 1348." Art Quarterly XII (Spring 1949): 127
1954
Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. A Catalogue of Seven Marble Sculptures of the Italian Trecento and Quattrocento from the Collection of his Highness the Prince of Liechtenstein. New York, 1954:17-18, repro., as Orcagna.
1956
Paintings and Sculpture from the Kress Colllection Acquired by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation 1951-56. Introduction by John Walker, text by William E. Suida and Fern Rusk Shapley. National Gallery of Art. Washington, 1956: 258-260, no. 107, repro., as Angel with Hurdy-Gurdy by Orcagna.
1959
Paintings and Sculpture from the Samuel H. Kress Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1959: 389, repro., as Angel with Hurdy-Gurdy by Orcagna.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 164, as Angel with Hurdy-Gurdy by Orcagna.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 144, repro., as Angel with Hurdy-Gurdy by Orcagna.
1976
Middeldorf, Ulrich. Sculptures from the Samuel H. Kress Collection: European Schools XIV-XIX Century. London, 1976: 10.
1994
Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1994: 174, repro.