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Provenance

Bethell Walrond, Dulford House, Devon; (sale, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, 12-13 July 1878, 2nd day, no. 156); (Algernon Graves). Sir Henry-Hope Edwardes, 10th Bt., Wootton Hall, Ashbourne, Derbyshire; (sale, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, 27 April 1901, no. 11); Martin H. Colnaghi [d. 1908], London; sold 1908 to (Thos. Agnew & Sons, London), in joint account with (Wallis & Son, London); sold 1909 to (Scott & Fowles, New York).[1] Frank Bulkeley Smith [1864-1918], Worcester, Massachusetts; (his estate sale, American Art Association, New York, 22-23 April 1920, 2nd day, no. 109); bought by Otto Bernet, probably as an agent for William R. Timken [1866-1949], New York; by inheritance to his widow, Lillian Guyer Timken [1881-1959], New York; bequest 1960 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1908
Works by the Old Masters and Deceased Masters of the British School. Winter Exhibition, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1908, no. 184.
1967
Loan for display with permanent collection, Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences (now Chrysler Museum), Virginia, 1967-1972.
Bibliography
1951
Beckett, Ronald B. Lely. London, 1951: no. 100.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 74, as by Sir Peter Lely.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 65, repro., as by Sir Peter Lely.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 192, repro., as by Sir Peter Lely.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 224, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 162-165, repro. 163.
Technical Summary

The medium-fine canvas is plain woven; it has been lined. The ground is reddish brown, smoothly applied and of moderate thickness. The painting is executed in thin, fluid, transparent layers in the background with thicker, more opaque paint in the dress and flesh tones and low impasto in some of the details and highlights; certain passages are constructed by means of incorporating multilayered tonalities, such as the gray beneath the white edging of the dress, or the reddish shadows of the flesh paint. The paint surface has been moderately abraded overall, most prominently in the chin and neck, presumably due to overcleaning, and there are scattered retouchings. The face and white cuff were partially cleaned and the painting was revarnished with dammar in 1960; this moderately thick natural resin varnish, toned with dark-colored pigment, has discolored yellow slightly.