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Provenance

Purchased from the artist February 1817 by Mr. Hall(?).[1] Major Campbell. (John Levy Galleries), New York, 1934, from whom it was purchased by Mrs. Benjamin Franklin Jones, Jr. [1868-1928], Sewickley Heights, Pennsylvania (sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, 4-5 December 1941, 1st day, no. 22, repro.); bought by William R. Coe [1869-1955], Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York; Coe Foundation, New York; gift 1961 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1961
Extended loan for use by Ambassador David K.E. Bruce, U.S. Embassy residence, London, England, 1961-1969.
1972
Extended loan for use by Caspar Weinberger, Director of the Budget and Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, Washington, D.C., 1972-1975.
1978
Extended loan for use by the U.S. Embassy, London, England, 1978-
Bibliography
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 11, as General Sir Thomas Picton.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 4, repro., as General Sir Thomas Picton.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 20, repro., as General Sir Thomas Picton.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 38, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 10-12, repro. 11.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is twill woven; it has been lined. The ground is off-white, fairly thickly applied, almost masking the weave of the canvas. The painting is executed in quite thick, opaque layers with impasto in the highlights; there is a transparent red glaze in the uniform. There is fairly extensive discolored retouching, principally in the glazed areas of the uniform, but also, most disturbingly, in the sitter's right cheek, to cover drying craquelure (suggestive of underlayers not having been allowed to dry properly before the upper layers were applied). The varnish has discolored yellow to a significant degree.