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Inscription

lower right, FC in monogram and "ft" obscured and difficult to read: F.Cotes ft

Provenance

Probably painted for the sitter's husband, Thomas Horne; by descent to Henry, Baron Horne of Stirkoke [1861-1929], Stirkoke House, Caithness [Scotland]. (Vicars Bros., London); sold 26 March 1919 to (Thos. Agnew & Sons), London; sold 16 September 1919 to (John Levy Galleries, New York);[1] sold by 1925 to Benjamin F. Jones, Jr. [1868-1928], Sewickley Heights, Pennsylvania;[2] passed to his wife (sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, 4-5 December 1941, 1st day, no. 34, repro.), bought by William R. Coe [1869-1955], Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York; Coe Foundation, New York; gift 1961 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1925
Paintings by Old Masters from Pittsburgh Collections, Carniege Institute, Pittsburgh, 1925, no. 8, as Miss Crewe.
1961
Extended loan for use by Ambassador David K. E. Bruce, U.S. Embassy residence, London, England, 1961-1969.
1978
Extended loan for use by the U.S. Embassy, London, England, 1978-
Bibliography
1931
Heil, Walter. "Portraits by Francis Cotes." Art in America 20 (1931): 2, 6, fig. 5.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 32, as Miss Elizabeth Crewe.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 26, repro., as Miss Elizabeth Crewe.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 82, repro., as Miss Elizabeth Crewe.
1976
Johnson, Edward Mead. Francis Cotes. Oxford, 1976: 101, no. 293.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 101, repro., as Miss Elizabeth Crewe
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 44, repro. 43.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is plain woven; it has been lined. The ground is off-white, fairly thickly applied. The painting is executed in smooth, opaque layers, blended wet into wet, except for the background and feigned oval, which are more thinly and translucently applied; the drapery is executed in a relatively rapid and painterly manner with pronounced brushwork and moderate impasto. The impasto has been severely flattened during lining, and there are scattered small retouchings; otherwise the painting is in excellent condition. The varnish has discolored yellow to a significant degree.