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Provenance

Painted for the sitter, William Davenport, Davenport House, Worfield, Shropshire; by descent to Mrs. Cuthbert Leicester-Warren, daughter of Edmund Henry Davenport, 1890. A.J. Finberg.[1] (M. Knoedler & Co.), New York. (John Levy Galleries, New York). Benjamin Franklin Jones, Jr. [1868-1928], Sewickley Heights, Pennsylvania, by 1925, from whom it passed to his wife;[2] (sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, 4-5 December 1941, 2nd day, no. 23); William Robertson Coe [1869-1955], Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York; Coe Foundation, New York, 1955; gift 1961 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1887
Works by the Old Masters, and by Deceased Masters of the British School. Winter Exhibition Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1887, no. 29.
1925
Paintings by Old Masters from Pittsburgh Collections, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1925, no. 17, repro.
1931
Paintings and Drawings by Thomas Gainsborough, R.A., Cincinnati Art Museum, 1931, no. 6, pl. 30.
1961
Extended loan for use by Ambassador David K.E. Bruce, U.S. Embassy residence, London, England, 1961-1969.
1978
Extended loan for use by the U.S. Embassy, London, England, 1978-
Bibliography
1898
Armstrong, Sir Walter. Gainsborough & His Place in English Art. London, 1898: 194; popular ed., London, 1904: 263.
1941
Parke-Bernet, New York. Sale Catalogue. 4-5 December 1941: 2nd day, no. 23.
1958
Waterhouse, Sir Ellis. Gainsborough. London, 1958: no. 189.
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 55
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 47, repro.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 144, repro.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 166, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 102-102, repro. 102.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is plain woven; it was lined during conservation, 1980-1981. The ground or imprimatura is a pale pinkish brown (there may be a white or off-white layer underneath). The painting is executed very fluidly, generally in an exceptionally rapid and painterly manner, with the ground used as a middle tone. The hair and flesh tones are extremely thinly painted, with the details of the hair applied in feathery blues, blacks, and yellows, and the features indicated in strong tints of red and blue; by contrast, the hands are very richly modeled. There are slight pentimenti in the contours of the shoulders, especially the right shoulder. The paint surface gives the impression of having been abraded, but this is due to Gainsborough's technique. Apart from a fairly large area of retouching in the trees immediately to the left of the sitter's right shoulder, and scattered small retouchings, the painting is in excellent condition. The thinly applied synthetic varnish has not discolored.