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Inscription

center left: F.B. Carpenter / 1859.

Provenance

The sitter's husband, Henry C. Bowen [1813-1896], New York, and Woodstock, Connecticut; his son, Clarence Winthrop Bowen [1852-1935], New York, and Woodstock, Connecticut; his daughter, Roxana Wentworth Bowen [later Mrs. William Stephen Van Rensselaer and Lady Gordon Vereker, 1895-1968], Valbonne, France; gift 1961 to NGA.





Exhibition History
1860
Annual Exhibition, National Academy of Design, New York, 1860, no. 197, as A Lady.
1862
The Third [annual] Exhibition, Brooklyn Art Association, March 1862, no. 113, as Portrait.
Bibliography
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 20, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 32, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 37, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 49-51, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support consists of a fine, tightly woven twill fabric that has been lined. The four-member oval stretcher with four vertical mortise-and-tenon joins appears to be original. There is a white ground of medium thickness. Paint was applied in a straightforward manner; highlights were done with impasto and slight glazing used for shadows. Brushwork is visible in the modeling of some of the draperies, but other areas, such as the sitter's bare shoulders and the bodice of her dress, were painted in an extremely thin manner. Although no major losses are present, damage to the paint layer has occurred along much of the edge and under the rabbet, and excessive wear is apparent in the area of the sitter's upper torso. The varnish has discolored considerably, and there are extensive residues of heavily discolored varnish.