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Provenance

(Ehrich Galleries, New York).[1] (Sale, Silo, New York, 16 February 1929, no. 378);[2] Chester Dale [1883-1962], New York; bequest 1963 to NGA.

Bibliography
1965
Summary Catalogue of European Paintings and Sculpture. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 20, as British School, Portrait of a Little Girl.
1968
European Paintings and Sculpture, Illustrations. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1968: 13, repro., as British School, Portrait of a Little Girl.
1975
European Paintings: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1975: 48, repro., as British School, Portrait of a Little Girl.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 22, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 313-314, repro. 313.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is plain woven; it has been lined. The white ground, consisting apparently of white lead, is smoothly applied and of moderate thickness. The composition is laid out in flat areas of opaque, buttery paint over which the painting is executed in thin layers of rich, fluid paint, with transparent glazes for the damask patterning and to add depth of color. X-radiographs show that the head was originally more fully modeled, the cap once considerably longer on the left, and the hair somewhat shorter on the right. The paint surface is extensively abraded: much of the deep red damask pattern on the dress has been rubbed off, and portions of the thinly painted landscape are worn through. The impasto has been flattened during lining. There are two T-shaped tears just above the girl's right elbow and in the bodice extending down to the waist, which have been retouched with inpainting that has now discolored. There is considerable retouching elsewhere which blends well with the paint. The residues of former varnishes have discolored deeply, and the natural resin varnish has discolored yellow to a moderate degree.