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Inscription

lower center: A B Durand / 1858

Provenance

Frederick Sturges [d. 1917], New York, and Fairfield, Connecticut;[1] his son, Frederick Sturges, Jr. [1876-1977], New York, and Fairfield, Connecticut; bequest 1978 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1998
American Light: Selections from the National Gallery of Art, Art Museum of Western Virginia, Roanoke, May-August 1998, no cat.
1998
Treasures of Light: Paintings from the National Gallery of Art, Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, March-April 1998, no cat.
Bibliography
1978
Lawall, David B. Asher B. Durand: A Documentary Catalogue of the Narrative and Landscape Paintings. New York and London, 1978: 120, possibly no. 225.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 147, repro.
1981
Williams, William James. A Heritage of American Paintings from the National Gallery of Art. New York, 1981: 113-114, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 162, repro.
1992
Cushman, Helen Baker. The Mill on the Third River: A History of the Davey Company. Jersey City, New Jersey, 1992: 23, 24, repro.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 142-144, repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a fine, plain-weave fabric. A thin white ground was applied in one smooth layer. The paint surface was built up through many layers, with glazes often employed. Although there is some impasto in the whites, the brushstrokes are generally restrained, with minimal texture evident. Drying cracks and wrinkling are visible in several areas, most notably in the landscape of the middle distance and the mountains at the center. In 1979 the painting was relined, discolored varnish was removed, and the painting was restored. The most disfiguring areas of craquelure and several small losses along the edges were inpainted. The varnish has not discolored.