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Provenance

Painted for Germain Lavie [d. 1781], Putney, London; by inheritance to his daughter, Emilia Lavie Lechmere [Mrs. Luther Lechmere], one of the children in the picture; by inheritance to her son, John Lechmere; by inheritance to his widow, Sophie Lechmere; by inheritance to her nephew, Charles Luther Lechmere; by inheritance to his sister, Grace Lechmere Reynolds; by inheritance to her daughter, Grace Reynolds Lewis [Mrs. Philip H. Lewis], London;[1] (sale, Sotheby's, London, 29 June 1960, no. 46); (Frost & Reed, London); (John Nicholson Gallery, New York); purchased October 1960 by Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia; gift 1983 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1963
Painting in England 1700-1850, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, 1963, no. 236, repro., pl. 231.
1986
Gifts to the Nation: Selected Acquisitions from the Collections of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1986, unnumbered checklist
Bibliography
1971
Praz, Mario. Conversation Pieces. London, 1971: 150, fig. 111.
1978
Egerton, Judy. British Sporting and Animal Paintings 1655-1867: The Paul Mellon Collection. London, 1978: 121-122, pl. 45.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 441, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 356-357, repro.
1997
Henderson, Anne. "Portraits & Personalities." Washington Parent (November 1997): 14-15.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is loosely plain woven; it has been lined. The ground is cream colored; it is evenly applied and of moderate thickness. The painting is executed in fairly rich and moderately opaque layers with some impasto in the highlights. The entire paint surface is significantly abraded; there are traces of overpaint throughout: a thin layer of light-colored overpaint covers much of the sky. Discrete paint loss is minimal. The natural resin varnish has discolored to a moderate degree.