Overview

No overview available.

Inscription

Marks and Labels

null

Provenance

Susan Macdowell Eakins [Mrs. Thomas Eakins, 1851-1938], Philadelphia; her estate; (Babcock Galleries, New York); (Garelick Gallery, Detroit); Marshall M. Miller, Huntington Woods, Michigan; Peter Brady, Washington, D.C., by 1977.[1] (Middendorf/Lane, Washington, D.C.), in 1979.[2] (sale, Christie, Manson & Woods, New York, 24 April 1981, no. 92);[3] (Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York); sold 1982 to John Wilmerding, Washington, D.C.; gift 1991 to NGA.

Exhibition History
1991
Art for the Nation: Gifts in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1991, 276-277, color repro.
1991
Loan to display with permanent collection, Mitchell Museum, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mt. Vernon, Illinois, 2012.
Bibliography
1933
Goodrich, Lloyd. Thomas Eakins: His Life and Work. New York, 1933: no. 450, 203.
1992
Homer, William Innes. Thomas Eakins: His Life and Art. New York, 1992: 242, fig. 231.
1996
Kelly, Franklin, with Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., Deborah Chotner, and John Davis. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part I. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1996: 185-189, color repro.
Technical Summary

The support is a medium-weight, plain-weave fabric that, although lined, retains the original tacking margins. A white ground layer was thinly, but uniformly applied. Over this white layer is a brown layer, which was left exposed in several areas of the finished image. Examination with ultraviolet light reveals a grid pattern of the type frequently used by the artist in transferring his sketches to finished paintings. The paint was applied with unblended strokes in fairly transparent layers. Minor compositional changes around the head and bandanna are visible in normal light. Several areas of rubbing that seem unrelated to the present image suggest the artist had begun another work on this same support and then scraped it out. There are only scattered small losses, scratches, and abrasions in the paint surface, but its texture was apparently flattened during a past lining. The varnish has not discolored.