Teacher Workshops 2014–15

Workshops are designed to help teachers find meaning and pleasure in the visual arts. These programs introduce art in the Gallery's collection and special exhibitions, explore interdisciplinary curriculum connections, and model methods for teaching with art. All programs include teaching resource materials.

Teachers of all subjects (pre-kindergarten through grade 12), homeschoolers, and pre-service educators are welcome. Space is limited, so please register early.

J. Carter Brown Memorial Evening with Educators

Wyeth, Wind from the Sea (1947), tempera on hardboard

Wyeth, Wind from the Sea (1947), tempera on hardboard

 

 

Andrew Wyeth
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
4:00–7:30 p.m.

Andrew Wyeth: Looking Out, Looking In highlights the Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, artist’s fascination with windows—a theme he explored over several decades in more than 300 works in oil, tempera, and varied media on paper. A time-honored motif, the window has long signified the artist’s vision and serves as a metaphor for representational painting, a “window” onto the world.  Strikingly realistic, Wyeth’s window images are skillfully manipulated constructions with multiple visual devices and vantage points. Tour this special exhibition of more than 50 objects at the National Gallery of Art, its only venue worldwide, from May 4 through November 30, 2014. Bring a colleague and enjoy this evening of art, food, and fun!

After-School Weekday Workshops

Joan Mitchell, Flower I (1981), lithograph

Joan Mitchell, Flower I (1981), lithograph

 

 

Creative Collaborations: Visual Art and Language Acquisition
Wednesday, January 7, 2015
Repeat date: February 25, 2015
4:00–6:30 p.m.

Both sessions are full.
Please email teacher@nga.gov to be placed on the wait list

Use visual art in the ESL or foreign-language classroom to build vocabulary and communication skills. By linking the visual and verbal, you can engage students in imaginative encounters with works of art while improving their cultural and linguistic competencies. This workshop will demonstrate the natural partnership between image and word and model a variety of practical and creative teaching strategies.

O. Redon, Pandora (1910/1912), oil

O. Redon, Pandora (1910/1912), oil

 

 

Mythology as Meaning-Making
Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Repeat date: Wednesday, February 18, 2015
4:00–6:30 p.m.

The January 21 session is full.
Please email teacher@nga.gov to be placed on the wait list

This workshop addresses the relationship of mythology to the human condition and the need to make sense of experience. Drawing upon ancient Greek and Roman prototypes, artists’ varying interpretations of myths will be discussed. Using an imaginative combination of storytelling and visualization, participants will invent their own mythological figures to address a modern-day problem or set of circumstances.

Saturday Workshops

V. Thornton, Books, intaglio print

V. Thornton, Books, intaglio print

 

 

Using Art to Teach Reading Comprehension
Saturday, January 31, 2015
Repeat date: Saturday, February 7, 2015
10:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Both sessions are full.
Please email teacher@nga.gov to be placed on the wait list

This hands-on workshop demonstrates how art can be used to strengthen reading comprehension. Taught by Montgomery County educators Elizabeth Stuart and Jennifer Klein, and based on their book Using Art to Teach Reading Comprehension Strategies (2013), participants will be guided through lessons designed to sharpen student skills in visualizing, inferring, and determining importance. This program is ideal for elementary and middle school classroom teachers and those wishing to collaborate with art specialists while working toward an integrated curriculum.

M. Prendergast, Central Park (c. 1901), monotype

M. Prendergast, Central Park (c. 1901), monotype

 

Marvelous Monotypes!
Saturday, February 28, 2015
Repeat date: Saturday, March 7, 2015
10:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Both sessions are full.
Please email teacher@nga.gov to be placed on the wait list

Explore the process of making a monotype—a unique print made by painting and drawing on a smooth surface and transferring that image to paper. The appeal of this medium lies in its spontaneity and its combination artistic processes. Monoprinting also allows a unique translucency and quality of light very different from painting or printing on paper. Participants will practice mixing paints, preparing papers, and exploring the visual effects obtainable with a variety of tools. Suited for experienced artist-printmakers as well as novices, this workshop encourages you to pursue your own creative vision while solving artistic and technical problems. Best yet, the monotype process allows quality results at little expense and is easily adapted to the studio-art classroom.

Cancel

If you are unable to attend a program for which you are registered, please call (202) 842-6796 or e-mail teacher@nga.gov24 hours notice, or more, will allow us to accommodate teachers on the waiting list.

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