Post-Impressionism: Cross-Currents in European and American Painting, 1880-1906

May 25 – September 1, 1980

East Building, Concourse (18,000 sq. ft.)

THIS EXHIBITION IS NO LONGER ON VIEW AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY.

Overview: 273 paintings were lent by more than 170 museums and private collectors for this exhibition focused on the period between 1880, when European and American artists began to question the tenets of pure impressionism, and 1906, the year of Paul Cézanne's death. A work by Vincent van Gogh was added after the exhibition opened. 7 catalogued works were not exhibited. This modified and reconstructed version of a Royal Academy of Arts exhibition was hurriedly arranged to take the place of an exhibition from Leningrad, which had been abruptly canceled. Alan Bowness, director of the Tate Gallery, with John House and MaryAnne Stevens, directors of the 428-picture Royal Academy show, organized the reduced survey. Van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Georges Seurat, and Cézanne were placed in the context of work by their contemporaries not only in France, but also in Belgium, Holland, Germany, Norway, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, England, Ireland, Scotland, and the United States.

Organization: The American section was selected by John Wilmerding with Wanda Corn. Exhibition coordinator was Lyndel King. Gaillard Ravenel and Mark Leithauser designed the exhibition and Gordon Anson designed the lighting.

Sponsor: The exhibition was supported by a grant from GTE Corporation.

Attendance: 557,533

Catalog: Post-Impressionism: Cross-Currents in European and American Painting 1880-1906, by Alan Bowness, John House, MaryAnne Stevens, et al. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 1980.

Brochure: Post-Impressionism: Cross-Currents in European and American Painting, 1880-1906. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 1980.

Image: Paul Cézanne, Houses in Provence: The Riaux Valley near L'Estaque, c. 1883, oil on canvas, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1973.68.1