The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology: Celebrated Discoveries from The People's Republic of China

September 19, 1999 – January 2, 2000

East Building, Mezzanine Northeast

THIS EXHIBITION IS NO LONGER ON VIEW AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY.

Overview: The exhibition featured 206 objects created between 5000 B.C. and 960 A.D., representing 5 dynasties of Chinese rule. The objects included sculpture, ritual implements, musical instruments, paintings, calligraphy, and other decorative objects in ceramic, jade, stone, wood, bamboo, lacquer, gold, silver, and bronze. The exhibition was a sequel to the exhibition of Chinese archaeological finds shown at the National Gallery of Art in 1974.

Chinese bell-ringing ceremonies were performed in the East Building on September 17, 18, and 19.

Organization: The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, in cooperation with the State Administration of Cultural Heritage and Art Exhibitions China, The People's Republic of China. Xiaoneng Yang, curator of Chinese art, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, was guest curator.

Sponsor: The exhibition was sponsored by Eastman Kodak Company. Additional support was provided by The Henry Luce Foundation. The exhibition received an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. The catalogue was supported by a grant from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation.

Attendance: 208,636

Catalog: The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology: Celebrated Discoveries from The People's Republic of China, edited by Xiaoneng Yang. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 1999.

Brochure: The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology: Celebrated Discoveries from The People's Republic of China, by Susan M. Arensberg. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 1999.

Other Venues: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, February 13–May 7, 2000
Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, June 17–September 11, 2000

Image: Installation view of The Golden Age of Chinese Archaeology: Celebrated Discoveries from The People's Republic of China, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gallery Archives