The Darker Side of Light: Arts of Privacy, 1850–1900
October 1, 2009 – January 18, 2010
West Building, Ground Floor, Outer Tier Galleries G27, G28, G29

This exhibition is no longer on view at the National Gallery.

Overview: 82 prints, 2 drawings, 3 small sculptures, and 6 volumes dating from the second half of the 19th century were shown in this exhibition of works created for intimate, private enjoyment. The exhibition was drawn largely from the holdings of the National Gallery of Art, augmented by loans from public and private collections. The exhibition was organized in 8 thematic sections: Possession, Nature, The City, Creatures, Reverie, Obsession, Abjection, and Violence and Death.

On October 4, curator Peter Parshall presented a lecture about the exhibition followed by a catalogue book signing. Two Sunday Concerts and two midday concerts in September and October offered music in honor of the exhibition.

Organization: The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art. Peter Parshall, curator of old master prints, was curator.

Attendance: 56,369

Catalog: The Darker Side of Light: Arts of Privacy, 1850–1900 by Peter Parshall et al. Washington: National Gallery of Art in association with Lund Humphries, Surrey, U.K., 2009

Other Venues: Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, Los Angeles, April 5–June 28, 2009
Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, February 11–June 10, 2010

Image: Adolphe Appian, Pêcheur en Canot, au bord d'une Rivière (Fisherman in a Boat), 1887, etching with monotype on china paper, Gift of Jacob Kainen, 2002.98.371

Audio and Video

The Darker Side of Light: Arts of Privacy, 1850-1900
Audio, Released: September 29, 2009, (12:05 minutes)
Press Event: The Darker Side of Light: Arts of Privacy, 1850-1900
Audio, Released: September 29, 2009, (36:52 minutes)