From Neoclassicism to Futurism: Italian Prints and Drawings, 1800–1925

September 1, 2014 – February 1, 2015

West Building Ground Floor

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    Luigi Sabatelli I, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1809-1810, etching, 
Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

     

     

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    Giuseppe Cornienti, after Gaetano Monti, Alessandro Manzoni, 1858, acquatint and roulette, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

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    Carlo Bossoli, Balaklava, 1857, gouache with watercolor on paper laid down on canvas on plywood, Florian Carr Fund

     

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    Francesco Paolo Michetti, Southern Italian Woman Dressed for Church, c. 1885-1888, pastel, black and white chalks on faded blue-gray paper, Florian Carr Fund and The Ahmanson Foundation

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    Giovanni Fattori, Donna al Gabbro (Woman of the Gabbro), 1886-1887, etching, The Ahmanson Foundation

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    Telemaco Signorini, Via Santa Maria della Tromba, 1886, etching, 
The Ahmanson Foundation

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    Luigi Conconi, Vita contemplativa (self-portrait), c. 1883, 
etching with aquatint, 
Purchased as the Gift of Matthew and Ann Nimetz

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    Mosè Bianchi, Woods in the Park near Monza, 1895, 
etching and aquatint, Purchased as the Gift of Matthew and Ann Nimetz

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    Giacomo Balla, Ti Ta Tò, 1918, color lithograph, William B. O'Neal Fund

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    Anselmo Bucci, Place Blanche à Montmartre, 1915, 
drypoint, Purchased as the Gift of Matthew and Ann Nimetz

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    Carlo Carrà, Testa di Ragazzo (Head of a Boy), 1919, etching, Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund

The visual arts in Italy between the first stirrings of nationalistic sentiment and its corruption into Fascism—that is, during the long development of the modern Italian state—remained extraordinarily diverse and vital. While the artistic dominance of Italy in the Renaissance and Baroque eras has always been recognized, its contributions to the history of modern art are routinely neglected—in part because nineteenth and early twentieth century Italian art resists a single narrative or any simple characterization. The National Gallery of Art has in recent years begun to develop a collection of Italian prints and drawings of this period that is surpassed only by the holdings of Italy’s principal museums.  With some eighty works, including academic figure studies, stage designs, topographic views, experimental etchings, and avant-garde drawings and books by several of the main participants in the Futurist movement, this exhibition is the first to present the Gallery’s effort, introducing a largely unfamiliar and greatly undervalued area of modern art.

Organization: Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Image: Giovanni Fattori, Donna al Gabbro (Woman of the Gabbro), 1886–1887, etching, The Ahmanson Foundation, 2013.28.4