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Advance Exhibition Schedule

Upcoming Exhibitions

Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, August 9–December 4, 2016
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 5–June 4, 2017

Luca della Robbia (1400-1483), a master sculptor in marble and bronze, invented a glazing technique for terracotta sculpture that positioned him as one of the most innovative artists of the 15th-century. Today, the sculptures created by Luca and his family workshop retain their brilliant opaque whites, deep cerulean blues, and botanical greens, purples and yellows over modeling that makes them powerful, expressive examples of Italian Renaissance art. Resistant to weather and easily readable at a distance, Della Robbia works were widely collected in the late 19th and early 20th-century by Americans traveling to Italy who sought to bring a piece of Renaissance Florence home. Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence will present some 40 works by Luca, his nephew Andrea (1435-1525), Andrea's sons, and the competing Buglioni workshop, drawn chiefly from American collections but also including major loans from Italy. Various sculptural types—Madonna and Child reliefs, portraits, architectural decorations, household statuettes and active full-scale figures—will illustrate the range and emotional appeal of Della Robbia glazed ceramics. Technical analysis and conservation conducted at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Brooklyn Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art will provide new insight into how these groundbreaking works were made. A richly illustrated book, the first English-language overview of three generations of Della Robbia sculpture, will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in association with the National Gallery of Art.

This exhibition is made possible by Altria Group on behalf of Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, and by Marchesi Antinori S.p.A.Major support is provided by Sally Engelhard Pingree and The Charles Engelhard Foundation, and the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Foundation.Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Andrea della Robbia, Madonna and Child with Cherubim, c. 1485, glazed terracotta, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

 

In the Tower: Theaster Gates
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 5–September 4, 2017

Over the past decade, American artist Theaster Gates (b. 1973) has explored the built environment and the power of art and culture to transform experience. For the second exhibition in the reopened East Building Tower 3 galleries, Gates will present a new body of work—The Minor Arts—featuring several pieces created for the Gallery. The installation will examine how discarded and ordinary objects, including the floor of a Chicago high school gym and the archives of Ebony magazine, acquire value through the stories we tell.

Presented with support from the Tower Project of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Theaster Gates, 2014, photo by Sarah Pooley, courtesy of the artist.

 

East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 12–July 16, 2017
New Orleans Museum of Art, October 5, 2017–January 7, 2018

Along with Civil War images, pictures of the American West have long dominated the canon of 19th-century American landscape photography, but scant attention has been given to many of the photographers working in the eastern half of the United States. East of the Mississippi is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on this rich chapter of America’s photographic history. 175 works—including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereo cards, and albums—show landscapes ranging from dramatic views of Niagara Falls and picturesque scenes in the White Mountains to devastated Civil War battlefields and the construction of the Atlantic & Great Western Railway. A fully illustrated catalog further explores the work of approximately 50 photographers, highlighting their practices and concerns.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with the New Orleans Museum of Art.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Trellis Fund. Additional funding is kindly provided by Kate and Wes Mitchell.

Caption: Henry Peter Bosse, Construction of Rock and Brush Dam, L.W. 1891, 1891, cyanotype, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

 

Frédéric Bazille and the Birth of Impressionism
Musée Fabre de Montpellier Agglomération, June 25–October 16, 2016
Musée d’Orsay, Paris, November 14, 2016–March 5, 2017
National Gallery of Art, Washington, April 9–July 9, 2017

Despite his contributions to the birth of impressionism, Frédéric Bazille (1841-1870) remains relatively unknown. A thematic presentation of 75 works—including paintings by contemporaries such as Claude Monet and Auguste Renoir—will bring to light Bazille’s place as a central figure in the movement. Several examples from the Gallery’s collection, which houses the largest group of Bazille’s works outside of France, will be featured in the first major American exhibition on the artist in almost 25 years. Paintings by his predecessors, Gustave Courbet and Théodore Rousseau, compared with those of Bazille, explore the sources and influences on his limited but visionary oeuvre.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Musée Fabre, Montpellier; and the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

Caption: Frédéric Bazille, Portraits of the *** Family, called The Family Gathering, 1867, oil on canvas, Musée d’Orsay, Paris

 

America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting
National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 21–August 20, 2017

As the founding fathers were drawing from French Enlightenment philosophy, early American collectors were developing a taste for 18th-century French painting. Since then, Americans have enthusiastically collected French painting from this period. Today, splendid works by artists such as François Boucher, Joseph Ducreux, and Jean-Honoré Fragonard are in public collections across the country—from major metropolises to Omaha, Muncie, and Jacksonville. For the first time, America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting will bring together nearly 70 of these paintings, well-known masterpieces and hidden gems alike, into an exhibition that tells the story of the collectors, curators, museum directors, and dealers responsible for developing an American appetite for the French rococo and neoclassical styles. A fully illustrated catalog on the development of this history of taste will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Joseph Ducreux, Le Discret, c. 1791, oil on aluminum, transferred from canvas, Spencer Museum of Art

 

Caption: Michel Sittow, Portrait of Diego Guevara (?), c. 1515/1518, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Michel Sittow: Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 4–May 13, 2018
Art Museum of Estonia/Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn, June 10–September 16, 2018

Undoubtedly the greatest Renaissance artist from Estonia, Michel Sittow (c. 1469–1525) was born in Reval (now Tallinn in present-day Estonia), likely studied in Bruges with Hans Memling, and worked at the courts of renowned European royals such as King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castille. Through some 20 works, representing most of Sittow's small oeuvre, the exhibition will offer an opportunity to examine his art in a broader context, including a possible collaboration with Juan de Flandes and Sittow's relationship to his Netherlandish contemporaries. The exhibition will be presented by both museums to mark the occasion of the centennial of the Estonian Republic and its presidency of the European Union from January through June 2018.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Art Museum of Estonia/Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn

Caption: Michel Sittow, Portrait of Diego Guevara (?), c. 1515/1518, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

 

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 4–May 28, 2018
Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, June 30–September 23, 2018
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, November 20, 2018–February 10, 2019
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 3–May 27, 2019
Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris, June 15–September 16, 2019

For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 125 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann's artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann's powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann's art; her family photographs; contemporary representations of the black body; the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory; and Mann's debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

Caption: Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled, (Scarred Tree), 1998, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. © 2016 Sally Mann

 

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, 1940-1950
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 11, 2018–February 18, 2019

During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912-2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decades of Parks’s 60-year career are the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 120 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Gordon Parks, Washington, D.C. Government charwoman (American Gothic), 1942, gelatin silver print, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation

 

Current Exhibitions

Caption: Stuart Davis, Arch Hotel, 1929, oil on canvas, Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Anna R. Frank M. Hall Charitable Trust. Photo © Sheldon Museum of Art

Stuart Davis: In Full Swing
Whitney Museum of American Art, June 30–September 25, 2016
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 20, 2016–March 5, 2017
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, de Young, April 8–August 6, 2017
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR, September 16, 2017–January 8, 2018

As one of the most important American modernists, Stuart Davis (1892–1964) blurred distinctions between text and image, high and low art, and abstraction and figuration, crafting a distinct style that continues to influence art being made today. Carefully selected from the full range of Davis's career, some 100 of his most important, visually complex, jazz-inspired compositions will be on view. Davis rarely painted a work that did not make careful reference (however hidden) to one or more of his earlier compositions. This exhibition offers a new exploration of his working method.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

This exhibition is made possible by Altria Group in celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art.

Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation.

The Terra Foundation for American Art also provided generous support.

Caption: Stuart Davis, Arch Hotel, 1929, oil on canvas, Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Anna R. Frank M. Hall Charitable Trust. Photo © Sheldon Museum of Art

 

Caption: Michiel van Musscher, An Artist in His Studio with His Drawings, c. 1665–1667, oil on panel, Liechtenstein Museum, Vienna

Drawings for Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 4, 2016–January 2, 2017
Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris, February 3–May 7, 2017

Dutch landscapes, still lifes, and scenes of daily life painted in the 17th century possess a remarkable immediacy and authenticity, giving the impression that Dutch artists painted them from life. However, these subjects—as well as biblical and mythological subjects—were actually painted in studios, often using drawings as points of departure. Some 100 drawings and paintings by such renowned golden age artists as Jan van Goyen and Rembrandt van Rijn will reveal the many ways Dutch artists used preliminary drawings in the painting process. The exhibition will include sketchbooks, broad compositional drawings, individual figural motifs, counterproofs, and carefully ruled construction drawings. It will also examine the drawings artists made on their panel and canvas supports before painting their scenes.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Fondation Custodia/Frits Lugt Collection, Paris

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of Dr. Mihael and Mrs. Mahy Polymeropoulos.

Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Michiel van Musscher, An Artist in His Studio with His Drawings, c. 1665–1667, oil on panel, Liechtenstein Museum, Vienna

 

 

Caption: Robert Smithson, Untitled (Spiral Jetty), 1970, National Gallery of Art, Washington. Photograph by Gianfranco Gorgoni Caption: Virginia Dwan standing in the Language III installation (May 24–June 18, 1969). Photo courtesy Dwan Archive

Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 30, 2016–January 27, 2017
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, March 19–September 10, 2017

The remarkable career of gallerist and patron Virginia Dwan will be featured front and center for the first time in an exhibition of some 100 works, featuring highlights from Dwan's promised gift of her extraordinary personal collection to the National Gallery of Art. Founded by Dwan in a storefront in Los Angeles in 1959, Dwan's West Coast enterprise was a leading avant-garde space in the early 1960s, presenting works by abstract expressionists, neo-dadaists, pop artists, and nouveau réalistes, including Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Edward Kienholz, Yves Klein, Arman, Martial Raysse, Niki di Sant Phalle, and Jean Tinguely. In 1965, Dwan established a gallery in New York where she presented groundbreaking exhibitions of such new tendencies as minimalism, conceptual art, and land art, featuring works by Carl Andre, Walter de Maria, Dan Flavin, Michael Heizer, Robert Morris, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, Charles Ross, Robert Ryman, and Robert Smithson, among others. Dwan emerged as a leading patron of earth works during this period, sponsoring Heizer's monumental sculptures Double Negative (1969) and City (begun 1972); Smithson's masterpiece Spiral Jetty (1970); the first version of Walter de Maria's Lightning Field (1974); and Ross's Star Axis (begun 1971). The exhibition will trace Dwan's activities and the emergence of an avant-garde gallery in an age of mobility, when air travel and the interstate highway system linked the two coasts and transformed the making of art and the sites of its exhibition.

Organized by National Gallery of Art, Washington

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

Captions: Robert Smithson, Untitled (Spiral Jetty), 1970, National Gallery of Art, Washington. Photograph by Gianfranco Gorgoni; Virginia Dwan standing in the Language III installation (May 24–June 18, 1969). Photo courtesy Dwan Archive

 

Caption: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Know nothing, Believe anything, Forget everything), 1987/2014, screenprint on vinyl, National Gallery of Art, Washington Gift of the Collectors Committee, Sharon and John D. Rockefeller IV, Howard and Roberta Ahmanson, Denise and Andrew Saul, Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Agnes Gund, and Michelle Smith

In the Tower: Barbara Kruger
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 30, 2016–January 22, 2017

A focus installation on the work of American artist Barbara Kruger (b. 1945) will reopen the East Building Tower Gallery after the space's nearly three years of renovation. Inspired by the Gallery's recent acquisition of Kruger's Untitled (Know nothing, Believe anything, Forget everything) (1987/2014), the exhibition comprises related images of figures in profile over which Kruger has superimposed her striking figures of speech. The distinctive direct address of Kruger's texts (using active verbs and personal pronouns) contrasts with her selected images of passive figures to create arresting conceptual works of great visual power.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Know nothing, Believe anything, Forget everything), 1987/2014, screenprint on vinyl, National Gallery of Art, Washington Gift of the Collectors Committee, Sharon and John D. Rockefeller IV, Howard and Roberta Ahmanson, Denise and Andrew Saul, Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Agnes Gund, and Michelle Smith

 

Caption: Thomas Demand, Clearing, 2003, chromogenic print, Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker © Thomas Demand / Artists' Rights Society (ARS), New York

Photography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 30, 2016–January 29, 2017

The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection brings together works of critically important artists who have changed the course of photography through their experimentation and conceptual scope. In celebration of a pledged gift of 30 photographs from this important collection and the reopening of the East Building galleries, seminal works by Thomas Demand, Thomas Struth, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Jeff Wall, among others, will be on view. Especially rich in holdings of work by photographers of the famed Düsseldorf School, among them Struth, Candida Höfer, Andreas Gursky, and Thomas Ruff, the collection also includes examples by photographers exploring the nature of the medium itself, such as Demand, Cindy Sherman, and Vik Muniz.

Organized by National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Thomas Demand, Clearing, 2003, chromogenic print, Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker © Thomas Demand / Artists' Rights Society (ARS), New York

 

Caption: Alfred Stieglitz, Self-Portrait, probably 1911, platinum print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred Stieglitz Collection  Caption: Eadweard Muybridge, Ascending and descending stairs, Plate No. 504, 1887, collotype, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Museum purchase, 1887)

Intersections: Photographs and Videos from the National Gallery of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art
National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 29, 2016–January 2, 2017

Nearly 700 photographs from Eadweard Muybridge's groundbreaking publication Animal Locomotion, acquired by the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1887, became the foundation for the institution's early interest in photography. The Key Set of more than 1,600 works by Alfred Stieglitz, donated by Georgia O'Keeffe and the Alfred Stieglitz Estate, launched the photography collection at the National Gallery of Art in 1949. Inspired by these two seminal artists, Muybridge and Stieglitz, the exhibition brings together highlights of the recently merged collections of the Corcoran and the National Gallery of Art by a range of artists from the 1870s to today. The connections between the two photography collections will be explored through five themes—movement, sequence, narrative, studio, and identity—found in the work of the two founding photographers.

Organized by National Gallery of Art, Washington

Captions: Alfred Stieglitz, Self-Portrait, probably 1911, platinum print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred Stieglitz Collection; Eadweard Muybridge, Ascending and descending stairs, Plate No. 504, 1887, collotype, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (Museum purchase, 1887)

 

Caption: Govaert Flinck, The Governors of the Kloveniersdoelen, 1642, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, on loan from the City of Amsterdam

Civic Pride: Group Portraits from Amsterdam
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 10, 2012–March 11, 2017

The Dutch Golden Age yielded a unique style of portraiture, which shows leaders of military and civic organizations as though they had gathered together for a meal or a meeting, thereby emphasizing their personal interactions and shared responsibilities. Painted in 1642 and 1655, two large-scale group portraits by Govert Flinck (1615–1660) and Bartholomeus van der Helst (1613–1670) depict different sets of governors of the Kloveniersdoelen, the headquarters of one of Amsterdam's main militia companies.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

The exhibition is made possible by the Hata Foundation. This program is also supported, in part, by public funds from the Netherlands Cultural Services and through the generosity of Mrs. Henry H. Weldon.

Caption: Govaert Flinck, The Governors of the Kloveniersdoelen, 1642, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, on loan from the City of Amsterdam

 

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 7, 2012–ongoing

One of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands―acquired over the course of four decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman―was promised to the National Gallery of Art in October 2010. This permanent installation on the Ground Floor of the West Building highlights nearly 100 examples of the Kaufmans' early American furniture and decorative arts, presented with a selection of porcelains as well as watercolors by Pierre Joseph Redouté also from the Kaufman Collection. National Gallery paintings by such celebrated American artists as Gilbert Stuart are integrated into the display. The Kaufman gift dramatically transforms the Gallery's collection, augmenting its fine holdings of European decorative arts with equally important American works of art, and it is the first major display of early American decorative arts on continual public view in the nation's capital.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

 

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