National Gallery of Art - EXHIBITIONS

Max Weber's Modern Vision

Exhibition Brochure | Related Information

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Captions


1.   Crouching Nude Figure, 1910/1911, linocut in brown on oriental paper. National Gallery of Art, Gift of Jack and Margrit Vanderryn, 1997
2.   Head of a Man, 1919/1920, woodcut in brown on gray mica paper. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Jack and Margrit Vanderryn, 1998
3.   Standing Nude with Upraised Arm, 1910, charcoal. Private Collection.
4.   Dancer in Green, 1912, watercolor, graphite, and pen and black ink on paperboard. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Director's Discretionary Fund, 1999
5.   Cubist Figure, 1915, pastel. Private Collection.
6.   Interior of the Fourth Dimension, 1913, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Natalie Davis Spingarn in memory of Linda R. Miller and in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art, 1990
7.   Rhythm Interlaced, 1915, pastel on paper. Private Collection
8.   Seated Figure, 1919/1920, color woodcut on laid paper. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection), 1976
9.   Crouching Nude, 1919/1920, woodcut in brown on oriental paper. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Jack and Margrit Vanderryn, 1997
10.   Crouching Nude, 1919/1920, color woodcut on laid paper. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Daryl and Lee Rubenstein, 1976
11.   Crouching Nude, 1919/1920, color woodcut on oriental paper. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection), 1976

Resources

For an overview of Weber's print oeuvre, see Daryl R. Rubinstein, Max Weber: A Catalogue Raisonné of His Graphic Work (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980).

For an overview of Weber's cubist work, see Percy North, Max Weber: The Cubist Decade, 1910-1920 (Atlanta, High Museum of Art, 1991).

This brochure was written by Charles Ritchie, department of modern prints and drawings, and produced by the department of exhibition programs and the editors office.


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