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The Fauves Henri Matisse  
       

An animation showing various images by various Fauve painters

1. André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, John Hay Whitney Collection 1982.76.3

2. André Derain, Mountains at Collioure, 1905, National Gallery of Art, Washington, John Hay Whitney Collection 1982.76.4

3. André Derain, View of the Thames, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon 1985.64.12

4. Albert Marquet, Posters at Trouville, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney 1998.74.1

5. Maurice de Vlaminck, Tugboat on the Seine, Chatou, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney 1998.74.4

6. Georges Braque, The Port of La Ciotat, 1907, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney 1998.74.6

 

Matisse and colleagues, including André Derain, Maurice de Vlaminck, and Albert Marquet, persevere, and their paintings are hung in Room 7. The public jeers at the "orgy of pure colors," judging the works primitive, brutal, and violent. The artists are dubbed "fauves"—wild beasts. Room 7 becomes "la cage."

The term fauve, actually coined by a generally sympathetic critic, has stuck. It describes a style that, while short-lived, was the first avant-garde wave of the twentieth century. The jeering audiences in Room 7 got an early look at what the century would bring.

Most of these fauve paintings were done in the years immediately after the 1905 exhibition.

 



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