Art Nouveau designer Richard Riemerschmid created a "Room for an Art Lover" for the exhibit representing German applied arts at the Paris World's Fair of 1900. An elaborate plaster frieze adorned the walls of this room. Designers of the Art Nouveau exhibition planned to recreate the three-dimensional effect of the original frieze using a two-dimensional silkscreen technique.

Click on an image for a larger view and an extended caption describing the production process.


Art Nouveau flourished in Munich... Art Nouveau designer Richard Riemerschmid created a "Room for an Art Lover"...
NGA designers plan to reproduce the Riemerschmid frieze... A linear print technique was chosen to create an illusion of depth...
Blow-ups were positioned to test alignment of silkscreen stencils... A custom-built press was assembled...
Cutting of the design begins... The cut film is carefully aligned...
A solvent is used to bond the film to the prepared screen... Final touch-ups are applied before printing begins...
A screen is ready to be attached to the press... Plans are studied carefully before printing...
Registration pins were added to aid alignment of the screens... Ink is staged at one end of the screen...
A squeegee pulls ink across the screen... The sheet was realigned for printing of the second color...
Final reviews were made before trimming and mounting... A strip of finished print is carefully mounted on the wall...
The adhesive-backed mylar is rolled to affix it to the wall... The silkscreen team surveys its handiwork...
The final section was screened directly onto the wall... The screen must be positioned quickly before the ink runs...
The first ink color is screened directly onto the doorway... The Riemerschmid frieze reproduction is finished...


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