Miro, Personnage Gothique, Oiseau-Éclair (Gothic Personage, Bird-Flash)National Gallery of Art
Sculpture Garden
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President Franklin D. Roosevelt accepts the National Gallery of Art as a gift to the nation and the West Building opens to the public
1941
President Franklin D. Roosevelt accepts the National Gallery of Art as a gift to the nation and the West Building opens to the public.





1966
National Gallery president Paul Mellon and Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall sign a cooperative agreement for the creation of a National Sculpture Garden on the Gallery's future Sculpture Garden site. The National Gallery is to be responsible for the selection and care of the works of art and for educational activities.

1971
Ground-breaking takes place for the East Building of the National Gallery of Art, designed by architect I.M. Pei.

Andrew Mellon in his apartment in the McCormick at 18th Street and Massachusetts Ave. NW.,
1974
A skating rink, the first phase of the National Sculpture Garden constructed by the National Park Service and developed jointly with the National Gallery of Art, opens to the public. The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, which occupies the site across the Mall to the south of the Sculpture Garden, opens to the public.


1976
In celebration of the nation's bicentennial, the National Gallery of Art presents an exhibition of replicas of colonial and revolutionary war-era flags on the Sculpture Garden site.


The East Building, a gift of Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, opens to the public.
1978
The East Building, a gift of Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, opens to the public.
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