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Made with mostly square or rectangular pieces of patterned paper in shades of asparagus and moss green, sky blue, tan, and ashy brown, a man with dark skin sits in the center of this horizontal composition with a second person over his shoulder, in the upper left corner of this collage. The man’s facial features are a composite of cut-outs, mostly in shades of brown and gray, as if from black-and white photographs, and he smokes a cigarette. He sits with his body angled slightly to our right and he looks off in that direction, elbows resting on thighs and wrists crossed. His button-down shirt and pants, similarly collaged, are mottled with sky blue and white. One foot, on our right, is created with a cartoonish, shoe-shaped, black silhouette. The paper used for the other foots seems to have been scraped and scratched, creating the impression that that foot is bare. A tub, made of the same blue and white paper of the man’s suit, sits on the ground to our left, in the lower corner. The man seems to sit in front of a cabin made up of green and brown pieces of paper patterned with wood grain. In a window in the upper left, a woman’s face, her features similarly collaged, looks out at us. One dark hand, large in relation to the people, rests on the sill with the fingers extended down the side of the house. The right third of the composition is filled with papers patterned to resemble leafy trees. Closer inspection reveals the form of a woman, smaller in scale than the other two, standing in that zone, facing our left in profile near a gray picket fence. She has a brown face, her hair wrapped in a patterned covering, and she holds a watermelon-sized, yellow fruit with brown stripes. Several blue birds and a red-winged blackbird fly and stand nearby. Above the woman and near the top of the composition, a train puffs along the top of what we read as the tops of trees. The artist signed the work in black letters in the upper right corner: “romare bearden.”

Romare Bearden, Tomorrow I May Be Far Away, 1967, collage of various papers with charcoal, graphite and paint on paper mounted to canvas, Paul Mellon Fund, 2001.72.1

Connecting Art and Social Studies Curricula: Lessons on the Great Migration

MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom

  • Thursday, February 11, 2021
  • 4:00 p.m.
  • Registration Required
  • Virtual Program

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators, a guest teacher presenter, and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers, connecting works of art to social studies curricula and civic education, focusing on the Great Migration. Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.