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World War II Provenance Research

Alessandro Algardi, A Flagellator of Christ, c. 1630s, silver, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 1991.124.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This object was sold in 1942 with the Eugen Gutmann collection of 225 silver, jewelry, and Renaissance objects to the dealers Karl Haberstock and Julius Boehler [See papers of Haberstock Gallery, National Archives RG 260/Box 446, copies NGA curatorial records]. After the war the Gutmann heirs filed a claim for the return of the collection, which was recovered in Starnberg, Germany, and sent to the Munich Central Collecting Point. This sculpture was restituted to the Dutch government with others from the Gutmann collection on 8 July 1946. [See Dutch claim #N-3, National Archives RG 260/747; see also Munich property card #16395/33 and Dutch Receipt for Cultural Objects no. 15A, item no. 110, National Archives RG 260/288, copies NGA curatorial records]. 

Selected Associated Names

Böhler, Julius
Gutmann, Eugen
Haberstock, Karl
Munich Central Collecting Point

1 of 32

Antwerp 16th Century, Matthys Cock, The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine, c. 1540, oil on plywood transferred from panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1952.2.18

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This picture was acquired from Karl Rössler in 1940 by the dealer Walter Paech in Amsterdam. Paech sold the painting to Hans Posse, for Hitler's planned museum in Linz. (See Linz inventory no. 1368, as by Brueghel, National Archives RG260/Boxes 428, 430, copies NGA curatorial files). The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered at Alt Aussee and restituted to the Netherlands on 4 March 1946 (See Munich property card #4347/2996, National Archives RG260/Munich Central Collecting Point/Box 501 and Dutch Receipt for Cultural Property no. 8A, dated 7 March 1946, National Archives RG260/Munich Central Collecting Point/Box 288, both copies NGA curatorial files.) The painting was restituted to Rössler on 23 May 1947 (see documentation provided by the Dutch Inspectie Culuurbezit in letter dated 5 February 2002, in NGA curatorial files.)

Selected Associated Name

Munich Central Collecting Point

2 of 32

Jacopo de' Barbari, Nude Woman Holding a Mirror (Allegory of Vanitas), c. 1503/1504, engraving, Rosenwald Collection, 1948.11.18

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This print is inventory no. 829 of the Rudolf Ritter von Gutmann collection [1880-1966 , L2770] confiscated by the Nazis in Austria in 1938. The collection was stored at the Zentraldepot in Vienna and transferred to the salt mine at Alt Aussee. The print was restituted to the Viennese dealer Christian M. Nebehay acting on Gutmann’s behalf in August 1947 (Restitution decision in Zl. 4716/47; export license in Zl 4694/47 dated 11 August 1947, all Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna, copies in NGA curatorial files).

Eight other prints from the Gutmann collection are in the National Gallery of Art, all restituted via the dealer Nebehay. These are: 1948.11.56 (no. 772); 1949.4.1 (no. 799); 1948.11.15 (no. 804); 1948.11.138 (no. 828); 1949.5.36 (no. 830); 1948.11.17 (no. 833); 1948.11.20 (no. 834); 1950.17.16 (no. 846).

Selected Associated Names

Gutmann, Rudolf
Nebehay, Christian

3 of 32

Pierre Bonnard, Work Table, 1926/1937, oil on canvas, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 2006.128.12

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

During World War II the painting was confiscated from the Paul Rosenberg collection in Paris by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR). Documents from the National Archives in Washington indicate that the painting had been selected by Hermann Goering on 9 July 1941 from the Jeu de Paume (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, Liste der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände, dated 20 October 1942, 1 Nachtrag, no. 31, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 78, copy in NGA curatorial files). Goering traded the picture to the dealer Gustav Rochlitz, from whom it was recovered after the war. The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to France on 27 March 1946 (Munich property card #8046, National Archives RG260/Box 503, copies in NGA curatorial files). It was exhibited in 1946 in Les Chefs-d'oeuvre des collections privées françaises retrouvés en Allemagne par la Commission de Récuperation artistique et les Services allies, no. 52.

Selected Associated Names

Bernheim-Jeune
ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point
Rochlitz, Gustav

4 of 32

François Boucher, Design for a Funeral Monument, c. 1767, black chalk and stumping with touches of graphite, heightened with white, on brown laid paper, Gift of Arthur L. Liebman, 1992.87.28

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Selected Provenance

This drawing was among the Rothschild collections confiscated by the Nazis in Austria in 1938 and stored at the monastery in Kremsmünster, from where it was later evacuated to the salt mine at Alt Aussee. It was discovered there by US forces and in July 1945 sent to the Munich Central Collecting Point (Munich Central Collecting Point Property Card no. 4804, US National Archives, copy NGA curatorial files). On 15 December 1945 it was returned Kremsmünster and placed under the control of the Landeskonservator of Land Oberoesterreich. It was restituted to the Rothschild family on 4 October 1947 (AR 711, export license Zl 5905/47 dated 3 October 1947, Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna, copies in NGA curatorial files).

Selected Associated Names

Munich Central Collecting Point
Rothschild, Alphons de
Rothschild, Clarice de, Baroness

5 of 32

Eugène Boudin, On the Jetty, c. 1869/1870, oil on wood, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.13

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) from the Levy de Benzion collection in France. The painting was selected by Hermann Goering on 25 November 1942 from the Jeu de Paume (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, Liste der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände, dated 20 October 1942, 1. Nachtrag, no. 67, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 78, copy in NGA curatorial files). The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to France on 18 April 1946 (Munich property card no. 5914; French Receipt for Cultural Objects no. 6A, item no. 950, National Archives RG260/Ardelia Hall/Box 286 copies NGA curatorial files). The painting was returned to the Levy de Benzion family on 10 May 1946.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point

6 of 32

Hendrick ter Brugghen, Bagpipe Player, 1624, oil on canvas, Paul Mellon Fund and Greg and Candy Fazakerley Fund, 2009.24.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Possibly Gustav Klemperer Edler von Klemenau [1852-1926], Dresden; his son, Dr. Herbert von Klemperer [1878-1951], Berlin (Dr. Klemperer was forced to surrender the painting when he left Germany in 1938: sale, Lange, Berlin, 18-19 November 1938, no. 151); acquired by Wallraf-Richartz-Museum, Cologne, inv. no. 2613; restituted July 2008 to Klemperer's heirs.

Selected Associated Names

Bernheimer Fine Arts Ltd.

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Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Madame Stumpf and Her Daughter, 1872, oil on canvas, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.23

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Given by the artist to Monsieur F. Stumpf; Stumpf family until at least 1906;[1] Mme Barbier de Saint Hilaire, née Madeleine Stumpf, the child in the painting; sold by 1922 to (Tedesco Frères, Paris) and (Paul Rosenberg and Co., New York, London and Paris). 

According to a letter from Alexandre Rosenberg dated 27 June 1977, in NGA curatorial files, the painting was confiscated with others from the Rosenberg collection in France in 1940, traced to a Swiss collection in 1945, and returned to the Rosenbergs in 1947. The painting is listed as no. 37.954 in the Répertoire des biens spoliés en France durant la guerre 1939-1945 [List of Property Removed from France during the War, 1939-1945, Groupe française du conseil de controle, 1947. Documents from the National Archives in Washington indicate that the picture was confiscated on 18 September 1940 from the château of Floirac (see letter dated 15 December 1944 from Edmond Rosemberg with first list of Floirac pictures, National Archives RG 260/743, copy NGA curatorial files). The painting was selected by Hermann Goering from the Jeu de Paume (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, Nachtrag zur Liste v. 20.10.42 der für die Sammlung des Reichnsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegestände dated 9 April 1943, no. 3, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/box 78; see also OSS dispatch dated 29 August 1945, National Archives RG 226/Entry 190/Box 532, copies in NGA curatorial files). The French dealer Zacharie Birtschansky [1889 - c.1950] was then involved in selling the picture to Hans Wendland for a Swiss dealer, probably Fischer (see OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, p. 57-8, National Archives RG 226/Entry 99/Box 105, copy NGA curatorial files).

Selected Associated Names

Barbier de Saint Hilaire, Madeleine, Mme.
ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Rosenberg & Co., Paul P.
Stumpf, F.
Tedesco Frères
Wendland, Hans

8 of 32

Gustave Courbet, La Bretonnerie in the Department of Indre, 1856, oil on canvas, Gift of the W. Averell Harriman Foundation in memory of Marie N. Harriman, 1972.9.8

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Exhibited at Paul Rosenberg Galleries in Paris in 1937. It was deposited with part of the Rosenberg collection at the Banque Nationale pour le Commerce et l'Industrie in Libourne, from which it was confiscated by the Nazi's ERR on 28 April 1941 (see Rosenberg claim file, National Archives RG260/Box 743, copies in NGA curatorial files). Documents from the National Archives in Washington indicate that the painting had been selected by Hermann Goering on 14 September 1941 from the Jeu de Paume (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, Liste der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände, dated 20 October 1942, no. 52, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 78, copy in NGA curatorial files). The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to France on 29 January 1946 (Munich property card #5836/788; French Receipt for Cultural Objects no. IIIa, item no. 167, National Archives RG260/Box 503 and RG260/Box 287, copies in NGA curatorial files). The painting was returned to the Rosenbergs on 17 May 1946 (see correspondence dated 23 June 2000 from the French Ministere des Affaires Étrangeres in NGA curatorial files).

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point
Rosenberg & Co., Paul P.

9 of 32

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Portrait of a Man, 1522, oil on panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1959.9.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the Nazis in 1938 with others in the collection of August and Serena Lederer, Vienna. It was discovered in 1945 by US forces at the abbey in Kremsmünster and transferred to the salt mine at Alt Aussee. By August 1947 it was transferred to the control of the Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna. [Receipt for objects of Austrian origin, dated 14 July 1947, item no. 841, National Archives RG 260/USACA/Box 1, copy in NGA curatorial files.] According to a letter dated 10 April 1987 from Gerald G. Stiebel to John Hand, in NGA curatorial files, this and 1959.9.2 were acquired from the Lederer family by the firm of Rosenberg & Stiebel, who sold the paintings to the Kress Foundation in 1954.

Selected Associated Names

Lederer, August and Serena
Stiebel, Ltd.

10 of 32

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Portrait of a Woman, 1522, oil on panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1959.9.2

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the Nazis in 1938 with others in the collection of August and Serena Lederer, Vienna. It was discovered in 1945 by US forces at the abbey in Kremsmünster and transferred to the salt mine at Alt Aussee. By August 1947 it was transferred to the control of the Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna. [Receipt for objects of Austrian origin, dated 14 July 1947, item no. 841, National Archives RG 260/USACA/Box 1, copy in NGA curatorial files.] According to a letter dated 10 April 1987 from Gerald G. Stiebel to John Hand, in NGA curatorial files, this and 1959.9.1 were acquired from the Lederer family by the firm of Rosenberg & Stiebel, who sold the paintings to the Kress Foundation in 1954.

Selected Associated Names

Lederer, August and Serena
Stiebel, Ltd.

11 of 32

Edgar Degas, Three Studies of Ludovic Halévy Standing, c. 1880, charcoal on tan laid paper, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1985.64.88

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

During World War II the drawing was confiscated by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR, no. D-W 355) from the David-Weill collection in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, and recovered by David-Weill after the war. David-Weill was president of the Conseil artistique de la Réunion des Musées Nationaux. His claim for objects not recovered after the war is published in the Répertoire des biens spoliés en France durant la guerre 1939-1945, Groupe français du conseil de controle, 1947.

Selected Associated Names

David-Weill, David
ERR

12 of 32

Edgar Degas, Three Studies of Ludovic Halévy Standing, c. 1880, charcoal counterproof on buff wove paper, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1985.64.167

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

During World War II the drawing was confiscated by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR, no. D-W 355a) from the David-Weill collection in France, and recovered by David-Weill after the war. David-Weill was president of the Conseil artistique de la Réunion des Musées Nationaux. His claim for objects not recovered after the war is published in the Répertoire des biens spoliés en France durant la guerre 1939-1945, Groupe français du conseil de controle, 1947.

Selected Associated Names

David-Weill, David
ERR

13 of 32

Henri Fantin-Latour, Self-Portrait, 1861, oil on canvas, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1995.47.9

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

The painting was lent by David-Weill, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, to the 1936 exhibition of Fantin-Latour's work held in Grenoble. During World War II the painting was confiscated by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) from the David-Weill collection in France, and recovered by the Allies. The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was restituted to France on 11 July 1946, with David-Weill as the presumed owner (Munich property card #181/6; French Receipt for Cultural Objects no. 9A, item no. 77; copies in NGA curatorial files). The painting was returned to the David-Weill family in September 1946 (see correspondence from the French Ministere des Affaires Étrangeres in NGA curatorial files). David-Weill was president of the Conseil artistique de la Réunion des Musées Nationaux. His claim for paintings not recovered after the war is published in the Répertoire des biens spoliés en France durant la guerre 1939-1945, Groupe français du conseil de controle, 1947.

Selected Associated Names

David-Weill, David
ERR
Munich Central Collecting Point

14 of 32

Florentine 15th Century, Desiderio da Settignano, Florentine 19th Century, Ciborium for the Sacrament, 1460s-c.1470 (stem with integral base); probably 1860s-c. 1870 (dome, enclosure, base beneath enclosure); 1870s (finial, bottom plinth), marble, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1952.5.100

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This object appears to have been part of the Vienna collection of Alphonse de Rothschild which was confiscated by the Nazis in 1938 and stored at the Kunsthistoriches Museum in Vienna. Its location was published in 1942 as the storeroom of the Kunsthistoriches Museum by Leo Planiscig, Desiderio da Settignano, Vienna, 1942: 22. It was returned to the Rothschilds by 1951 when it was acquired by the Kress Foundation from the Baroness de Rothschild; see Kress files in NGA curatorial records.

Selected Associated Names

Kress Foundation, Samuel H.
Rothschild, Alphons de
Rothschild, Clarice de, Baroness

15 of 32

Francesco Francia, Bishop Altobello Averoldo, c. 1505, oil on poplar panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1952.5.64

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was among the Baron Alphons de Rothschild collections confiscated by the Nazis in Austria in 1938. It was discovered in 1945 by US forces at the abbey in Kremsmünster and transferred to the salt mine at Alt Aussee. By August 1947 it was transferred to the control of the Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna. (Alt Aussee receipt for objects of Austrian origin, dated 14 July 1947, item number 1169, National Archives RG 260/USACA/Box 1, copy in NGA curatorial files.) It was restituted to the Rothschild family on 16 October 1947 (Index card for AR 873, restitution decision in Zl. 5739/47 dated 23 September 1947; export license in Zl 5905/47 dated 3 October 1947, all Bundesdenkmalamt, Vienna, copies in NGA curatorial files).

Selected Associated Names

Rothschild, Alphons de
Rothschild, Clarice de, Baroness
Rothschild, Nathaniel Mayer von, Baron

16 of 32

Hans Holbein the Younger, Portrait of a Young Man, c. 1520/1530, oil on panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1961.9.21

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the Nazis from Louis de Rothschild collection in Vienna in 1938 and was destined for Hitler's planned museum in Linz, Austria. It is listed on the 20 October 1939 Vorschlag sur Verteilung der in Wien beschlagnahmte Gemaelde: Fuer das Kunstmuseum in Linz prepared by Hans Posse, and also his Verzeichnis der fuer Linz in Aussicht genommenen Gemaelde dated 31 July 1940 (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #4, Linz: Hitler's Museum and Library, 15 December 1945, Attachments 72 and 73, National Archives RG226/Entry 190B/Box 35, copy NGA curatorial files). The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to Austria on 25 April 1946 with Rothschild as the presumed owner. (Munich property card #2306/7; Austrian Receipt for Cultural Property no. IIIa, item no. 29; copies in NGA curatorial files.)

The work went on to Rosenberg & Stiebel, New York, put on consignment with M. Knoedler & Co., New York, May, 1947; transferred to Knoedler's regular stock in June with a portion owned by Rosenberg & Stiebel. A letter of 2 March 1988 to John Hand from Nancy C. Little, M. Knoedler & Co., in NGA curatorial files, describes the consignment to them from Rosenberg & Stiebel.

Selected Associated Names

Knoedler & Company, M.
Munich Central Collecting Point
Rothschild, Louis de, Baron
Stiebel, Ltd.

17 of 32

Jean-Antoine Houdon, Giuseppe Balsamo, Comte di Cagliostro, 1786, marble, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1952.5.103

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

The direct transfer from Sir John Murray Scott [1847-1912], secretary and advisor to Sir Richard Wallace [1818-1890] and Lady Julie Wallace [1819-1897], to Josephine Victoria Sackville-West and then to Jacques Seligmann in 1914 is described in Germain Seligman's book Merchants of Art, New York, 1961: 98-99. Seligmann Paris stock no. 7969 and New York no. 2205 (Archives of American Art, Seligmann Papers, NY Stock Catalogues, Box 280, folder 8, copy NGA curatorial files). Germain Seligmann, manager of Seligmann's New York branch, is listed as the owner in the catalogue of the 1932 exhibition of French art in London, and in Robert Cecil's 1950 article, "The Remainder of the Hertford and Wallace Collections," Burlington Magazine, XCII (June 1950): 170, no. 24. The bust was in Paris when the Nazis invaded in 1940 and was confiscated with other portions of the Seligmann family collections at that time. It was recovered and returned to France in 1947. Correspondence concerning Germain Seligmann's efforts to have the bust shipped from France to the United States beginning in 1948 can be found in the Seligmann papers, Archives of American Art, Box 141 (copies in NGA curatorial files).

Selected Associated Names

Sackville-West, Lady Sackville, Victoria
Scott, John Murray, Sir
Seligmann & Cie., Jacques
Wallace, 1st bt., Richard, Sir
Wallace, Julie-Amélie-Charlotte Castelnau, Lady

18 of 32

Joseph Anton Koch, Tivoli and the Waterfalls with Shepherd Families, 1821, pen and black ink over graphite, with border lines, on laid paper, Wolfgang Ratjen Collection, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2007.111.114

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

In 1938 Dr. Georg S. Hirschland [1885-1942], a patron of the Museum Folkwang, Essen, emigrated to the United States with his family, but was not permitted by the Nazi government to bring his art collection with him. In 1939 the Museum Folkwang and the city of Essen raised the funds to purchase the collection to keep it together; the funds were paid to an estate administrator. The collection consisted of 27 paintings and drawings including this by Koch, described as a pencil and India ink drawing of Tivoli.

Eleven Hirschland paintings were evacuated, with other paintings from the Folkwang, to a mine near Siegen, where they were recovered by Allied forces and taken in June 1946 to the Collecting Point at Marburg, in the American zone of Occupied Germany. Other Hirschland objects were discovered in a convent in the French zone, and several drawings, including the Koch, were identified as being in a palace Hugenpost bei Kettwig, near Essen, in the British zone, in 1947. (List of location of objects from the Hirschland estate enclosed in letter from Riegelman, Strasser, Schwarz & Spiegelberg to the US Secretary of State dated 22 March 1947, NARA, M1947/48.)

Georg Hirschland died in New York in 1942. After the war his heirs, represented by a New York law firm, made claims for the collection. The 11 paintings in Marburg were transferred by September 1946 to the Collecting Point in Wiesbaden, and in October 1948 were transferred to the British zone (Receipt for Interzonal Exchange dated 19 October 1938, NARA M1941/reel 45). The objects in the French zone could not be transferred as there was no interzonal agreement in place. By 1951 it appears that all but one of the Hirschland objects in the British zone had been released to the estate in the United States. The sole holdout was an El Greco for which there was difficulty in obtaining an export permit. (Letter dated 20 August 1951 from the Senior Finance Officer, British Control Council for Germany, National Archives, Kew, FO 1014/668.)

Selected Associated Names

Hirschland, Georg S.
Stiftung Ratjen

19 of 32

Wilhelm Leibl, Malresl Working in the Kitchen, c. 1898, graphite with stumping on polished wove paper, Wolfgang Ratjen Collection, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2007.111.117

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Max Silberberg [d. 1944], Breslau; (sale, Paul Graupe, Berlin, 12 October 1935, no. 64). (Sale, Karl und Faber, Munich, 30 May 1975, no. 448); Wolfgang Ratjen, Munich; repurchased 2003 by Ratjen Foundation from the heirs of Max Silberberg

Selected Associated Names

Graupe, Paul
Karl und Faber
Silberberg, Max
Stiftung Ratjen

20 of 32

Master of the Death of Saint Nicholas of Münster, Calvary, c. 1470/1480, oil on panel, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2001.70.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

The painting was confiscated by the Nazis in July 1940 from the collection of André Seligmann and taken to the Germany Embassy in Paris (See Verzeichnis der im Juli 1940 durch die Geheime Feldpolizei in Paris gesicherten und in die Deutsche Botschaft uberbrechten Gegenstände aus judischen Kunsthandlungen, p. 8-9, National Archives RG260/Ardelia Hall Collection/Box 469/File VII and ERR card no. SEL 545, as Westphalian, second half of the 15th century, National Archives RG260/Property Division/Box 19-20, both copies in NGA curatorial files). It was transferred to the Jeu de Paume from where it was removed by Hermann Goering on 5 November 1940 (OSS Consolidated Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, List der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Goering abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände dated 20 October 1942, no. 236, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 78, copy NGA curatorial files). The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to France on 30 October 1946 (see Munich property card #6772/1722 as Flemish c. 1480, National Archives RG260/Box 503, and French Receipt for Cultural Objects No. 14A, item no. 121, National Archives RG260/Box 287, copies NGA curatorial files). In 1951 the Office des Biens Privés deposited the painting at the Musée du Louvre in Paris (M.N.R. number 622). The painting remained there until 1999, when it was returned to André Seligmann's two daughters.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point
Musée du Louvre
Seligmann, André J.

21 of 32

Henri Matisse, Pianist and Checker Players, 1924, oil on canvas, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1985.64.25

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the ERR with others from the Paul Rosenberg collection in France in 1941 (ERR Inventory card UNB335, National Archives RG 260/Property Division/Box 22). It was selected by Hermann Goering from the Jeu de Paume, one of the six untitled paintings by Matisse from the Rosenberg collection listed as numbers 48-53 on the Nachtrag zur Liste v. 20.10.42 der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände dated 9 April 1943 (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, Attachment 5, National Archives RG239/Entry73/Box 78) and traded 10 December 1941 to Gustav Rochlitz, in whose possession it remained until the end of the war. It was recovered in one of Rochlitz' residences in Bavaria by the Allies and transferred to the Munich Central Collecting Point, and restituted to France on 27 March 1946 (OSS Detailed Interrogation Report #4, Gustav Rochlitz, National Archives RG239/Entry 74/Box 84 and Munich property card #8049/15; French Receipt for Cultural Objects no. 5A, item no. 298; copies in NGA curatorial files). It was returned to Paul Rosenberg on 17 May 1946 (See letter from the Ministere des Affiares Etrangeres dated 20 February 2001 in NGA curatorial files). After its restitution, the painting was exhibited in the 1946 Les Chefs-d'oeuvre des collections privées françaises retrouvés en Allemagne par la Commission de Récupération artistique et les Services alliés, no. 53.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point
Rochlitz, Gustav
Rosenberg, Paul

22 of 32

Henri Matisse, Still Life with Sleeping Woman, 1940, oil on canvas, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1985.64.26

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Purchased March 1940 from the artist by Paul Rosenberg and Co, New York. This painting was confiscated by the ERR in 1941 with others from the Rosenberg collection in France (see inventory of Rosenberg-Bernstein collection, National Archives RG260/Box 470/file XI, and ERR inventory card UNB322, National Archives RG260/Property Division/Box 22, copies NGA curatorial files). Documents from the National Archives in Washington indicate that the painting was selected by Hermann Goering on 3 March 1941 from the Jeu de Paume (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, 15 September 1945, Attachment 5, 2. Nachtrag zur Liste der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände, dated 9 April 1943, no. 6, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 78, copy NGA curatorial files). Goering is documented as having traded the painting to Gustav Rochlitz, who claimed to have sold it to Hans Wendland (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #1, Activity of the Einsatzstab Rosenberg in France, 15 August 1945, V: Details of Exchanges, exchange #1, item no. 7, National Archives RG 239/Entry 74/Boxes 84-84A and OSS Detailed Interrogation Report #4, Gustav Rochlitz, 15 August 1945, Einsatzstab Confiscated Paintings Sold by Rochlitz, no. 30, National Archives RG239/Entry74/Boxes 85-85A, copies NGA curatorial files.). However, according to Wendland, the Matisse remained with Rochlitz (OSS Detailed Interrogation Report, Hans Wendland, 18 September 1946, pp. 14-16, National Archives RG 239/Entry 73/Box 82, copy NGA curatorial files). Further documentation at the National Archives supports Wendland's claim. The picture is not among those known to have been sent by him to Switzerland with others from the same sale from Rochlitz (see Douglas Cooper, Report of Mission to Switzerland, 10 December 1945, pp. 8-9, National Archives RG 239/Entry 73/Box 82, copy NGA curatorial files). Moreover, in a letter dated 18 January 1945, Paul Rosenberg's brother Edmond states that by that time the picture was in a private collection in Paris, having been sold by the dealers Kohl and Renoux of rue Faubourg St. Honoré, Paris (National Archives, RG260/Box 743). Hector Feliciano, in The Lost Museum, New York, 1997, p. 121, reports that Matisse himself had seen the picture for sale in Paris in 1942. The picture was returned to the Rosenbergs (per telephone conversation with Rosenberg archives 16 March 2001) who later sold it to von Hirsch.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Hirsch, Robert von
Rochlitz, Gustav
Rosenberg & Co., Paul P.

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Henri Matisse, Woman Seated in an Armchair, 1940, oil on canvas, Given in loving memory of her husband, Taft Schreiber, by Rita Schreiber, 1989.31.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Purchased from the artist by Paul Rosenberg, Paris. This painting was confiscated by the ERR in 1941 with others from the Rosenberg collection in France (ERR inventory card PR34, National Archives RG260/Property Division/Box 19, copy NGA curatorial files). There is confusion in the archival records as to whether picture was taken from the Rosenberg vault at Libourne or the chateau at Floirac. In the Rosenberg claim file (National Archives RG260/Box 742, copies NGA curatorial files) there are lists and correspondence from Edmond Rosenberg, brother of Paul Rosenberg, which provide conflicting information. However, it seems likely the picture was taken from Floirac, as it was this part of the Rosenberg collection assigned the code "PR." Documents from the National Archives in Washington indicate that the painting was traded by the ERR on 16 November 1943, along with a Bonnard painting from the Kann collection, to the dealer Max Stöcklin in exchange for a painting by Rudolf Alt. (Receipt for the exchange, National Archives RG260/ Box 452, copy NGA curatorial files). The picture seems to be confused throughout the archival documentation with another Matisse painting described as of a woman in a yellow chair, which also appears to have been confiscated from the Rosenberg collection. However this second picture dates from 1939, is in a vertical format, and the woman is nude. On some documents the code PR34 seems to be associated with the 1939 picture, but it is clearly the NGA painting which is described on the ERR card for PR34, and on the receipt for the exchange between Stöcklin and the ERR. Moreoever, the photographs taken by the ERR of confiscated objects illustrate the NGA picture with the code PR34. After Stöcklin, the painting was traced to the Swiss dealer André Martin, and seen on view at the Galerie Neupert in Zurich (See item no. 62 on attachment B to Douglas Cooper's "Report on Mission to Switzerland," 10 December 1945, National Archives RG239/Entry 73/Box 82, copy NGA curatorial files).

The NGA picture was returned to the Rosenbergs by 1948, according to the records of the gallery, which sold it to Somerset Maugham in 1950.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Maugham, William Somerset
Rosenberg & Co., Paul P.

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Caspar Netscher, A Woman Feeding a Parrot, with a Page, 1666, oil on panel, The Lee and Juliet Folger Fund, 2016.118.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Hugo Daniel Andriesse [1867-1942], a Belgian industrialist and philanthropist, and his wife Elisabeth J. Spanjaard Andriesse [1871-1963] , lent the painting to an exhibition in Rotterdam that opened in late 1938. In 1939 he deposited it, with other paintings from his collection, with the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, before fleeing Europe with his wife and eventually settling in New York. From there, after the Germans occupied Belgium during World War II, the painting was confiscated with the rest of the Andriesse collection on 3 December 1941 by the Einsatztab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR no. HA 9), and on 12 March 1942 transferred to the Jeu de Paume, in Paris. On 20 March 1944 it was acquired for the Nazi’s Reichsmarshall Hermann Goering (RM no. 1203), and transferred to Goering’s “Kurfürst Bunker,” a command center for the Nazi Luftwaffe, in Potsdam. See the record for the painting at the Cultural Plunder by the ERR website: https://www.errproject.org/jeudepaume/ (accessed 30 June 2017).

In 1950, the painting was sold via Kunsthandlung Abels, Cologne to Rudolf Ziersch, Wuppertal, who gifted the painting to the Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, in 1952. The 1985 catalogue of 17th century Dutch paintings in the Von der Heydt Museum, Wuppertal, lists the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne in the provenance; this has not yet been confirmed.

In 2014, the work was restituted to the heirs of Hugo and Elisabeth Andriesse; as Hugo and Elisabeth Andriesse had no children, the heirs were the charities named in Mrs. Andriesse's will.

Selected Associated Names

Andriesse, Hugo Daniel and Elisabeth J. Spanjaard
ERR
Galerie Abels
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Von der Heydt-Museum
von der Pfalz, Johan Wilhelm II, Elector Palatine
Ziersch, Rudolf

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Friedrich Olivier, Shriveled Leaves, 1817, pen and gray-black ink and pen and black ink over graphite on wove paper, Wolfgang Ratjen Collection, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2007.111.137

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Selected Provenance

When Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany in 1938, Marianne Schmidl, the daughter of Josef Schmidl [1852-1916] and his wife Maria [1858-1934]—and the granddaughter of the artist, was subjected to persecution as a Jew. This led to her immediate involuntary retirement from her position at the Austrian National Library in Vienna. Due to her resulting precarious financial situation, Ms. Schmidl was forced to sell off the valuable drawings via C. G. Boerner, Leipzig, 28 April 1939, that she had inherited from her parents in order to pay the newly imposed "Jewish Property Tax" and for her general livelihood. Marianne Schmidl was deported to Poland on 9 April 1942 where she was killed.

The drawing was eventually part of the collection of Wolfgang Ratjen, Munich, which was purchased by the National Gallery of Art 2007. In 2016, the heirs of Marianne Schmidl and the National Gallery of Art came to a mutually acceptable agreement by which the Olivier remains in the collection of the National Gallery of Art. A second drawing from her collection (Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld, A Branch with Shriveled Leaves, formerly NGA 2007.111.160) was returned to the family.

Selected Associated Names

Boerner, C. G.
Heumann, Carl
Galerie Arnoldi-Livie
Stiftung Ratjen

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Camille Pissarro, Place du Carrousel, Paris, 1900, oil on canvas, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.55

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

This painting was confiscated by the ERR in France during World War II, with other objects from the Stahl collection that were stored in a bank vault with objects from the Wildenstein collection (ERR card UNB331, as Ansicht des Louvres, Paris. National Archives RG260/Property Division/Box 22, copy in NGA curatorial files). It was transferred to the Jeu de Paume and taken by Hermann Goering on 17 March 1941, as Louvreansicht, (No. 20 on the Nachtrag zur Liste v. 20.10.42 der für die Sammlung des Reichsmarschalls Hermann Göring abgegebenen Kunstgegenstände dated 9 April 1943 in OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #2, The Goering Collection, Attachment 5, National Archives RG239/Entry 75/Box 85, copy in NGA curatorial files). Goering traded the picture to Gustave Rochlitz in exchange for a Raffaellino del Garbo and a Wouters (OSS Consolidated Interrogation Report #1, Activities of the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg, p. 30, National Archives RG239/Entry 75/Box 85, copy in NGA curatorial files). The painting remained with Rochlitz, in whose possession it was found after the war (Detailed Interrrogation Report #4, Gustave Rochlitz, p. 9, National Archives RG239/Entry 74/Box 84, copy in NGA curatorial files). The painting was recovered by the Allies and restituted to France on 27 March 1946 (Munich property card #8040/6; French Receipt for Cultural Objects no. 5A, item no. 289, copies in NGA curatorial files). It was exhibited in 1946 in Les Chefs-d'oeuvre des collections privées françaises retrouvés en Allemagne par la Commission de Récuperation artistique et les Services alliés, no. 33. It was restituted to Wildenstein, from whose vault it had been removed, on 24 October 1947, and returned to Stahl that same year. Stahl sold the picture to Wildenstein on 5 January 1949.

Selected Associated Names

ERR
Galerie Georges Petit
Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Munich Central Collecting Point
Pissarro, Camille, Mme
Rochlitz, Gustav
Stahl, Bruno
Wildenstein & Co., Inc.

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Sir Peter Paul Rubens, Agrippina and Germanicus, c. 1614, oil on panel, Andrew W. Mellon Fund, 1963.8.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Purchased 1710 by Prince Johann Adam Andreas of Liechtenstein [1657-1712], Vienna, Austria, and Vaduz, Liechstenstein. Records from the Liechtenstein Collection in NGA curatorial files indicate that the painting was stored during World War II in the salt mine at Lauffen bei Ischl and returned to Liechtenstein in 1945.

Selected Associated Names

Liechtenstein, Johann Adam of, Prince
Liechtenstein, Princes of

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Salomon van Ruysdael, River Landscape with Ferry, 1649, oil on canvas, Patrons' Permanent Fund and The Lee and Juliet Folger Fund. This acquisition was made possible through the generosity of the family of Jacques Goudstikker, in his memory., 2007.116.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

The dealer Jacques Goudstikker fled Amsterdam with his wife and son in May 1940, and died in an accident on board the ship on which he left. He left behind most of his gallery's stock of paintings, including the Ruysdael, and with the rest of the Goudstikker paintings, it was confiscated by the Nazis later the same year and delivered to Hermann Göring; see Rapport inzake de Kunsthandel v.h J Goudstikker NV in oprichtung per 13 September 1940, Beilage III, Staat van Schilderijen, gekocht M Goering van de "oude" Goudstikker, Access no. 1341, inv. 103, Gemeentearchief, Amsterdam. The painting was recovered by the Allies at the end of World War II and held at the Munich Central Collecting Point (where it was no. 5324), before being returned to The Netherlands in 1948. In The Netherlands, ownership was transferred among several museums, during which time the painting maintained the identifying inventory number NK 2347: Stichting Nederlands Kunstbezit, The Hague, in 1948; Dienst voor's Rijks Verspreide Kunstvoorwerpen, The Hague, 1948-1975; Dienst Verspreide Rijkscollecties, The Hague, 1975-1985; Rijksdienst Beeldende Kunst, The Hague, 1985-1997; and Instituut Collectie Nederland, Amsterdam, in 1997. Physical custody of the painting was transferred in 1960 to the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, where it had the inventory number SK-A -983 and where it remained until 2006. In 2005, the Dutch Advisory Committee on the Assessment of Restitution Applications for Items of Cultural Value and the Second World War recommended in favor of the Goudstikker family's claim for the return of this and other paintings that had been confiscated in 1940. The surviving heirs were Marei von Saher, the widow of Goudstikker's son, Edward, and her daughters, Charlène and Chantel, who received the restituted paintings in early 2006.

Selected Associated Names

Goering, Hermann, Reichsmarschall
Goudstikker, Jacques
Munich Central Collecting Point
Saher, Marei von

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Luca Signorelli, The Marriage of the Virgin, c. 1490/1491, tempera on panel, Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1961.9.39

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

The NGA painting is no. 2585 on a May 1940 inventory of the Goudstikker gallery (copy NGA curatorial files). The Goudstikker firm and most of its contents were sold in July 1940 to Alois Meidl, an agent of Hermann Goering, to whom Miedl subsequently sold some of the inventory. The firm continued to operate throughout World War II under the Miedl's direction (see OSS Reports on Miedl, National Archives, RG239/Entry73/Box 80, copy in NGA curatorial files). According to documents in the Dutch State Archives the NGA painting was not sold to Goering. It was discovered in one of Miedl's buildings in the Netherlands after the war and returned to Goudstikker's widow, Desirée Goudstikker von Saher, on 18 May 1949. (Dutch State Archives ARA, NBI 857, nr. 7, copy in NGA curatorial files. See also letter dated 24 March 1999 from the Inspectie Cultuurbezit of the Netherlands, in NGA curatorial files.)

Selected Associated Names

Goudstikker, Jacques
Goudstikker von Saher, Desirée


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David Teniers the Younger, Peasants Celebrating Twelfth Night, 1635, oil on panel, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, 1972.10.1

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

Guy Stein. Baron Alex. Gendebien, Brussels, in 1937;[1] consigned c. 1939 for Baron Robert Gendebien by Eric-Emil Lyndhurst, Brussels, to (Katz Gallery, Dieren, The Netherlands); probably sold to (P. Smit van Gelder, Antwerp); sold to (J. Kalb); sold 12 February 1941 to (Goudstikker firm, Amsterdam); sold 11 December 1941 to Professor Hoffmann, Munich; Baron Robert Gendebien, Brussels, 1955. Eric-Emil Lyndhurst, Brussels, 1955.[2]

[1] The 1964 Gebr. Douwes exhibition catalogue lists a Baron Alex. Gendebien as the owner of the painting in 1937. According to correspondence with the Inspectie Cultuurbezit of the Netherlands and copies of documents provided by the Dutch State Archives, a Baron Robert Gendebien owned the painting in 1939 and was involved in its restitution after it was confiscated during World War II. The relationship between Alex. and Robert Gendebien, though obviously familial, is unclear.

[2] A note on Witt Library fiche no. 13.365 indicates that the painting was "stolen from Belgium, 1939/1945." Although the collection of Eric-Emil Lyndhurst, a Jewish collector and dealer, was confiscated by the Nazi Einstazstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) in 1943, this painting does not appear on the list of his collection compiled at that time. According to his statement of 23 July 1948, "[S]ome months before the outbreak of war in 1939, [he] handed over to Mr. Nathan Katz (of the Firm D. Katz, Dieren) [the Teniers painting] belonging to Baron Robert Gendebien for sale." Lyndhurst learned from Katz that the painting had been taken by the Germans during the war. After passing through Katz, Smit van Gelder, the Nazi-controlled Goudstikker firm, Kalb, and Hoffmann (probably Heinrich Hoffmann [1885-1957], Adolf Hitler's photographer) the painting made its way into Hitler's possession. The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that after the war the painting was recovered by the Allies in Austria and restituted to the Netherlands on 15 April 1946 (Munich property card #2588/Aussee 1932; Dutch Receipt for Cultural Objects No. 10a, item no. 34, copies in NGA curatorial files). The painting arrived in the Netherlands on 28 May 1946. Although it is unclear to whom the painting was returned by the Dutch authorities, Robert Gendebien was assumed to be the rightful owner and was involved in the restitution. After its return, he may have again put the painting on consignment to Lyndhurst, who, according to the 1964 Gebr. Douwes exhibition catalogue, was in possession of it in 1955. See the letter dated 9 December 1999 from the Inspectie Cultuurbezit of The Netherlands, and copies of documents from the Stichting Nederlands Kunstbezit, archive no. 267, sent 4 January 2000 by the Dutch State Archives, in NGA curatorial files.

Selected Associated Names

Becker, Heinrich, Dr.
Galerie Charpentier
Galerie Goudstikker
Gelder, P. Smit van
Katz, D.
Munich Central Collecting Point
Private Collection c/o Gebr. Douwes Fine Art
Schaeffer Galleries, Inc.
Stein, Guy

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François Etienne Villeret, Rue de Rivoli and Pavillon Marsan, watercolor over graphite on wove paper, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1995.47.69

This text is selected provenance involving World War II. For the full provenance, please visit the art object page via the link above.

Selected Provenance

During World War II this drawing was confiscated by the Nazi Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR, no. D-W 416) from the David-Weill collection in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, and recovered by the Allies. The records of the Munich Central Collecting Point indicate that the drawing was restituted to France on 11 July 1946, with David-Weill as the presumed owner (Munich property card #12549; copy in NGA curatorial files). David-Weill was president of the Conseil artistique de la Réunion des Musées Nationaux. His claim for objects not recovered after the war is published in the Répertoire des biens spoliés en France durant la guerre 1939-1945, Groupe français du conseil de controle, 1947.

Selected Associated Names

David-Weill, David
ERR
Munich Central Collecting Point

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