Audio and Video


Ways of Seeing Byzantium: An Introduction, Part 1

William Tronzo, visiting faculty, University of California, San Diego. Held in conjunction with the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections, on view from October 6, 2013, through March 2, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art, this symposium takes its name and perspective from art critic and novelist John Peter Berger’s 1972 book Ways of Seeing. Noted scholars Glenn Peers, Bissera Pentcheva, William Tronzo, and Alicia Walker seek to place the Heaven and Earth exhibition objects in context by answering questions generated by Berger’s book: What world did these objects constitute in Byzantium and how did they form it? What values did they embody or create? How were they used and understood? Conversely what world do these objects constitute for us now? How do we understand them? And most important, then and now, are these works considered art? 

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The Sixty-Third A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Part 3: Christian Origins and the Work of Time: Imagining the First Christians
Released: April 06, 2014
(68:29 minutes)

Anthony Grafton, Princeton University. In this six-part lecture series entitled Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Anthony Grafton focuses on the efforts of artists and scholars to recreate the early history of Christianity in a period of crisis in the church from the 15th to the 17th century. In this third lecture, entitled “Christian Origins and the Work of Time: Imagining the First Christians,” originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 13, 2014, Professor Grafton extols the religious imagination of the humanists who plumbed the early sources of Christian and Jewish traditions in order to write histories of the early church, producing unprecedented and radical visions of Christian origins.

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Ways of Seeing Byzantium: An Introduction, Part 1
Released: April 15, 2014
(26:06 minutes)

William Tronzo, visiting faculty, University of California, San Diego. Held in conjunction with the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections, on view from October 6, 2013, through March 2, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art, this symposium takes its name and perspective from art critic and novelist John Peter Berger’s 1972 book Ways of Seeing. Noted scholars Glenn Peers, Bissera Pentcheva, William Tronzo, and Alicia Walker seek to place the Heaven and Earth exhibition objects in context by answering questions generated by Berger’s book: What world did these objects constitute in Byzantium and how did they form it? What values did they embody or create? How were they used and understood? Conversely what world do these objects constitute for us now? How do we understand them? And most important, then and now, are these works considered art? 

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : Paris Plays Itself: The Modernizing City Seen through the Lens (in Rewind), 1926 – 1865, Part 6
Released: April 15, 2014
(32:33 minutes)

Jeannene Przyblyski, provost and faculty, California Institute of the Arts. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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The Sixty-Third A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Part 2: Bearers of Memory and Makers of History: The Many Paths to Christian Antiquity
Released: April 06, 2014
(68:29 minutes)

Anthony Grafton, Princeton University. In this six-part lecture series entitled Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Anthony Grafton focuses on the efforts of artists and scholars to recreate the early history of Christianity in a period of crisis in the church from the 15th to the 17th century.  In this second lecture, entitled “Bearers of Memory and Makers of History: The Many Paths to Christian Antiquity,” originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on April 6, 2014, Professor Grafton argues that the history of knowledge was for millennia a history of books, the production of which established new standards of study and argument and ultimately the great libraries of Europe. Knowledge about the early church took the form of immense books—the work of learned scholars rich in erudition and impassioned by their beliefs, whose scholarship was often deeply prejudiced but sometimes reached original, prescient, and unexpected conclusions.

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : The Quarry in the City: Charles Marville’s Landscapes of the Carrières d’Amérique, Part 5
Released: April 08, 2014
(29:55 minutes)

Nancy Locke, associate professor of art history, The Pennsylvania State University. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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“Fair Greece, Sad Relic”: How Did Byzantium Reform Classical Greek Art?
Released: April 08, 2014
(45:56 minutes)

Robin Cormack, professor emeritus of art history, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. When Lord Byron went to Greece in 1810, it was the art and culture of antiquity that attracted him. The appreciation of the art of Christian Greece is very modern. Sometimes this Byzantine art is seen as a “decline” from classical art and sometimes as a new and progressive art form. In this lecture recorded on February 27, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art, Robin Cormack considers ways of looking at Byzantine art on the basis of the Gallery’s exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections. In this first-ever exhibition of Byzantine art at the Gallery, some 170 works, many never before lent to the United States, are on view through March 2, 2014. This program was coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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The Sixty-Third A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Part 1: How Jesus Celebrated Passover: The Jewish Origins of Christianity
Released: April 01, 2014
(68:29 minutes)

Anthony Grafton, Princeton University. In this six-part lecture series entitled Past Belief: Visions of Early Christianity in Renaissance and Reformation Europe, Anthony Grafton focuses on the efforts of artists and scholars to recreate the early history of Christianity in a period of crisis in the church from the 15th to the 17th century. In this first lecture, entitled “How Jesus Celebrated Passover: The Jewish Origins of Christianity,” originally delivered at the National Gallery of Art on March 30, 2014, Grafton explores how the pictorial form of the Last Supper, a central theme in art, was radically transformed after the beginning of the Reformation in 1517. He shows how writers with great archaeological and historical learning delved into Roman antiquities and Jewish texts from the time of the origins of Christianity in order to bring back the world in which the Last Supper actually took place.  

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Elson Lecture 2014: Allan McCollum
Released: April 01, 2014
(67:17 minutes)

Allan McCollum, artist. Born in Los Angeles in 1944, Allan McCollum briefly considered a career in theater before attending trade school to study restaurant management and industrial kitchen work. In the late 1960s, he began to educate himself as an artist. Applying strategies of mass production to handmade objects, McCollum has spent nearly fifty years exploring how works of art achieve personal and public meaning in a world largely constituted within the manners of industrial production. McCollum has given attention to the “drama of quantities” in his pursuit of the dynamic relationship between work and viewer. His installations—large fields of related small-scale works, each usually unique and categorically arranged—are the products of various systems. By engaging a cast of assistants, scientists, and local craftspeople in his processes, McCollum has often embraced a collaborative and democratic artistic practice.  His approach to art cuts across its hierarchies—by medium, audience, context, and preconception. In honor of the National Gallery of Art’s acquisition of his Collection of Four Hundred and Eighty Plaster Surrogates (1982/1989) last year, McCollum presented the 21st annual Elson Lecture on March 27, 2014.

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : Marville’s Street Lamps, Part 4
Released: April 01, 2014
(41:16 minutes)

Hollis Clayson, Samuel H. Kress Professor 2013–2014, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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The Collecting of African American Art XI: The Wedge Collection: Kenneth Montague in Conversation with Trevor Schoonmaker
Released: March 25, 2014
(78:36 minutes)

Maria Kanellopoulos, collection-manager and exhibition coordinator, Wedge Curatorial Projects; Kenneth Montague, collector, curator, and director, Wedge Curatorial Projects; and Trevor Schoonmaker, chief curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Curator of Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Kenneth Montague is a Toronto-based art collector and the founder and director of Wedge Curatorial Projects. Created in 1997, Wedge evolved from a commercial gallery into a nonprofit organization, exhibiting photo-based work with a strong focus on exploring black identity and the African diaspora. Wedge has collaborated with local and international institutions to create original exhibitions, educational programming, publications, and film and music series that speak to youth about shaping their own identity. In 2011 Montague organized Becoming: Photographs from the Wedge Collection in collaboration with Trevor Schoonmaker at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. In this conversation recorded on March 9, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art as part of the Collecting of African American Art series, Montague and Schoonmaker discuss the history and mission of their individual institutions and collaborations between them. Moderated by Maria Kanellopoulos, Wedge collection-manager and exhibition coordinator, the conversation also considers the future of acquisitions, exhibitions, and scholarship of work of the African diaspora.

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Introduction to the Exhibition: Garry Winogrand
Released: March 25, 2014
(57:09 minutes)

Leo Rubinfien, photographer and guest exhibition curator of Garry Winogrand. In honor of the National Gallery of Art’s exhibition Garry Winogrand, Leo Rubinfien, a friend and protégé of Winogrand’s during the last decade of his life, delivers this opening day lecture on March 2, 2014. A renowned photographer of American life—particularly New York City—from the 1950s through the early 1980s, Winogrand (1928–1984) worked with dazzling energy and a voracious appetite. Rubinfien provides an introduction to Winogrand's body of work: its themes, its optimism and fatalism, and the turbulent years in which it developed. This first Winogrand retrospective in 25 years presents some 180 photographs, including iconic images and more than 60 never-seen-before prints and contact sheets. Together they reveal the full breadth of his art. Garry Winogrand is on view through June 8, 2014.

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Kerry James Marshall | nga
Released: January 16, 2014
(7:20 minutes)

On October 27, 2013, Kerry James Marshall discusses his painting Great America (1994), acquired by the National Gallery of Art in 2011 as a gift of the Collectors Committee, and the inspiration for the Gallery’s exhibition In the Tower: Kerry James Marshall, on view June 28 through December 8, 2013. 

One of the most celebrated painters currently working in the United States, Marshall explores through his work the experiences of African Americans and the narratives of American history that have often excluded black people. In Great America, Marshall represents the Middle Passage as a haunted theme park ride, indirectly suggesting instead of specifically depicting the slave trade. The Middle Passage was the middle leg of the triangular trade of manufactured goods, crops, and human cargo between Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the colonial era through the 1850s. 

Drawing upon the artist’s prodigious knowledge of art history and the African diaspora, Marshall’s paintings combine figurative and abstract styles and multiple allusions, from both “high” and “low” sources. In Marshall’s art the past is never truly past: history exerts a constant, often unconscious pressure on the living. This interview followed Marshall’s participation in a panel discussion titled Making It: Race and Class in Contemporary America, held on the occasion of the artist’s In the Tower exhibition.

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Garry Winogrand at Rice University
Released: March 18, 2014
(16:21 minutes)

Photographer Garry Winogrand (1928–1984) is known for his sweeping portrait of American life during the postwar decades. His photographs powerfully combine the hope and exhilaration as well as the anxiety and turbulence that characterized America during these vital years, revealing a country that glitters with possibility but also threatens to spin out of control. 

In 1977, Winogrand was invited by photographer and professor Geoff Winningham to speak with students at Rice University in Houston. For more than two hours, Winogrand entertained questions from students on a broad array of topics; a selection from this seminar is shown here. This video was produced by the National Gallery of Art in conjunction with the exhibition Garry Winogrand, organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. © Geoff Winningham, 1977

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : Place Saint-Michel, A Case Study in Second Empire Urban Form, Part 3
Released: March 11, 2014
(28:48 minutes)

Stéphane Kirkland, author, Paris Reborn: Napoléon III, Haussmann, and the Quest to Build a Modern City. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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The Inside Story: Monuments Men and the National Gallery of Art
Released: March 18, 2014
(92:22 minutes)

Maygene Daniels, chief of Gallery Archives, and Gregory Most, chief of library image collections, National Gallery of Art; and Lynn H. Nicholas, author of The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe’s Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War. The Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) program was established in 1943 under the Civil Affairs and Military Government Sections of the Allied armies. The creation of the MFAA was largely the result of the Roberts Commission, which was headquartered at the National Gallery of Art and vice-chaired by the Gallery's director, David Finley. The officers who served in the MFAA (also known as the Monuments Men) were charged with the identification, protection, and restitution of Europe's cultural treasures during and after World War II. Prior to the war, six of these officers were associated with the National Gallery of Art, and in later years three held important positions at the museum. This lecture recorded on March 16, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art delves into the behind-the-scenes stories of these real-life Monuments Men, and women. Image: Lieutenant Frederick Hartt in Livorno, Italy, January 1945., Frederick Hartt Papers.

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Capital Culture: J. Carter Brown, the National Gallery of Art, and the Reinvention of the Museum Experience
Released: March 18, 2014
(52:51 minutes)

Neil Harris, Preston and Sterling Morton Professor Emeritus of History and of Art History, University of Chicago

In his book Capital Culture: J. Carter Brown, the National Gallery of Art, and the Reinvention of the Museum Experience, author Neil Harris reviews the twenty-three year tenure of J. Carter Brown as National Gallery of Art director. From 1969 to 1992, Brown transformed the Gallery, presided over the construction of the East Building, energized Washington cultural life, and reshaped thinking about museum exhibitions and museum experiences across the United States. In this lecture recorded on October 13, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art, Harris describes how Brown brought drama and excitement to a heavy exhibition schedule, and, for many, personified the glamorous alliance of art and international diplomacy.

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : Urban Graphics: Mapping, Picturing and Constructing the Nineteenth-Century Parisian Grid, Part 2
Released: March 11, 2014
(28:37 minutes)

Min Kyung Lee, assistant professor, Modern Architecture and Urban Planning College of the Holy Cross. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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Looking Forward, Looking Back
Released: March 11, 2014
(31:17 minutes)

Michael Snow, artist. Internationally renowned multidisciplinary artist Michael Snow (b. 1928, Canada) visited the National Gallery of Art on February 8 and 9, 2014, to introduce two programs of his influential experimental films. The four titles included—Wavelength (1966), So Is This (1982), Back and Forth (1969), and One Second in Montreal (1969)—all consider the astonishing, but often unrecognized, effects of light, memory, and duration on perception. Michael Snow introduced the program, and graciously took questions from the audience.

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Image of the Black in Western Art, Part III
Released: March 04, 2014
(84:21 minutes)

Panel discussion includes David Bindman, emeritus professor of the history of art, University College London; Ruth Fine, curator (1972–2012), National Gallery of Art; Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University; Richard J. Powell, John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History, Duke University; and Sharmila Sen, executive editor-at-large, Harvard University Press. Moderated by Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art. In the 1960s, art collector and philanthropist Dominique de Menil began a research project and photo archive called The Image of the Black in Western Art. Through the collaboration of Harvard University Press and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, the project nears its completion. This panel discussion commemorates the publication of the penultimate volume of the series, The Image of the Black in Western Art: The Twentieth Century: The Impact of Africa (vol. 5, part 1). The last two volumes in the series mark the 20th-century transition from the depiction of people of African descent by others to their self-representation in the US and elsewhere. In this program recorded on February 23, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art, the panelists discuss the implications of this dramatic shift in the emphasis of the volumes.

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Old Topographics: Photography and Urbanization in Nineteenth-Century Paris : Transit and Transition in Marville’s Paris, Part 1
Released: February 25, 2014
(111 minutes)

Masha Belenky, associate professor of French and acting chair, department of Romance, German, and Slavic Languages and Literatures, The George Washington University. Organized in conjunction with Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris, this symposium held on December 6, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art offers new perspectives on art and urbanism in 19th-century Paris. An international panel of art, architectural, and literary historians address the transformation of 19th-century Paris in papers that focus on diverse topics including the representation of Parisian quarries in 19th-century photography, painting, and literature; the formative role of architect Gabriel Davioud in reshaping Paris; the use of photography to map the changing city; new modes of transportation that shape the experience and representations of the city;  the impact of 19th-century photography of Paris on 20th-century film;  and the relationship between Marville’s urban documentation and contemporary photographic practice. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is on view at the Gallery through January 5, 2014.

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Conversations with Artists: Kerry James Marshall
Released: February 04, 2014
(75:43 minutes)

Kerry James Marshall has exhibited widely in both the United States and abroad and is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, among other honors. His work often explores the experiences of African Americans and narratives of American history that have historically excluded black people. Drawing upon the artist’s prodigious knowledge of art history and African diasporic culture, his paintings combine figurative and abstract styles and multiple allusions. In Marshall’s art, the past is never truly past: history exerts a constant, often unconscious pressure on the living. In this program recorded on June 26, 2013, exhibition curator James Meyer and Kerry James Marshall discuss the works and themes of his exhibition In the Tower: Kerry James Marshall, on view at the Gallery from June 28 to December 8, 2013.

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Witnessing Byzantium: The Greek Perspective
Released: February 04, 2014
(40:18 minutes)

Sharon E. J. Gerstel, professor of Byzantine art history and archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles. The Greek city of Thessaloniki was the Byzantine Empire’s second city, after Constantinople, in both wealth and size. In this lecture recorded on January 16, 2014, to celebrate the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections, which is on view at the National Gallery of Art through March 2, 2014, Sharon Gerstel examines this moment of artistic creativity in Thessaloniki. The first-ever exhibition of Byzantine art at the Gallery presents some 170 works of art, many never before lent to the United States, including mosaics, icons, manuscripts, jewelry, and ceramics. Using the Heaven and Earth exhibition as a lens, Gerstel focuses on works produced in Byzantium’s second city—demonstrating their importance in their own time and their significance for generations that followed. This program was coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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Speaking across Disciplines: Introducing “Facture,” a New Gallery Journal
Released: January 28, 2014
(53:17 minutes)

Daphne Barbour, senior object conservator; Melanie Gifford, research conservator; Lisha Glinsman, conservation scientist; Alison Luchs, curator of early European sculpture; and Kimberly Schenck, head of paper conservation, National Gallery of Art. FACTURE: Conservation · Science · Art History is a new biennial journal from the National Gallery of Art that introduces the latest research on works in its permanent collection. Named for “the manner in which things are made,” the journal presents essays on conservation treatment, scientific research, and technical art history. This study undertaken at the Gallery focuses on artists' methods and materials—identifying the materials used by artists, understanding the ways in which different artists handled these materials, and discerning how to preserve the qualities the artists prized. In honor of the inaugural volume, this lecture recorded on January 12, 2014, focuses on Renaissance masterworks—painting, sculpture, textiles, and works on paper—in the Gallery's collection.

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Visualizing Community: City and Village in Byzantine Greece: Art and Craftsmanship in Medieval Byzantium, Part 4
Released: January 14, 2014
(48:25 minutes)

Ioli Kalavrezou, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine Art, Harvard University. Organized to foster connections between the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections at the National Gallery of Art and the research interests and collections of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, this colloquium echoes the companion volume to the exhibition catalogue, Cities and Countryside in Byzantine Greece. Held on November 15, 2013, at the Gallery, American and Greek Byzantinists address the many ways community was visualized: in the arts (including mosaics, frescoes, icons, and everyday objects), in architectural construction, and in settings for the ceremonies of daily life and death. Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections is on view through March 2, 2014. This program is coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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Visualizing Community: City and Village in Byzantine Greece: Earthenwares from "Heavenly" Byzantium, Part 3
Released: January 14, 2014
(28:49 minutes)

Demetra Papanikola-Bakirtzi, director, The Leventis Municipal Museum of Nicosia. Organized to foster connections between the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections at the National Gallery of Art and the research interests and collections of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, this colloquium echoes the companion volume to the exhibition catalogue, Cities and Countryside in Byzantine Greece. Held on November 15, 2013, at the Gallery, American and Greek Byzantinists address the many ways community was visualized: in the arts (including mosaics, frescoes, icons, and everyday objects), in architectural construction, and in settings for the ceremonies of daily life and death. Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections is on view through March 2, 2014. This program is coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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Visualizing Community: City and Village in Byzantine Greece:New Discoveries from Byzantium Greece, Part 2
Released: January 14, 2014
(17:03 minutes)

Eugenia Gerousi, director, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine antiquities, The Hellenic Ministry of Culture. Organized to foster connections between the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections at the National Gallery of Art and the research interests and collections of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, this colloquium echoes the companion volume to the exhibition catalogue, Cities and Countryside in Byzantine Greece. Held on November 15, 2013, at the Gallery, American and Greek Byzantinists address the many ways community was visualized: in the arts (including mosaics, frescoes, icons, and everyday objects), in architectural construction, and in settings for the ceremonies of daily life and death. Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections is on view through March 2, 2014. This program is coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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Visualizing Community: City and Village in Byzantine Greece: Visualizing Community in Byzantium Greece, Part 1
Released: January 14, 2014
(17:03 minutes)

Robert Ousterhout, professor of art history and director of the center for ancient studies, University of Pennsylvania. Organized to foster connections between the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections at the National Gallery of Art and the research interests and collections of Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, this colloquium echoes the companion volume to the exhibition catalogue, Cities and Countryside in Byzantine Greece. Held on November 15, 2013, at the Gallery, American and Greek Byzantinists address the many ways community was visualized: in the arts (including mosaics, frescoes, icons, and everyday objects), in architectural construction, and in settings for the ceremonies of daily life and death. Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections is on view through March 2, 2014. This program is coordinated with and supported by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

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The Education of a Curator: Keeping It All in Balance
Released: December 24, 2013
(54:01 minutes)

Arthur J. Wheelock Jr., curator of northern baroque paintings, National Gallery of Art In 1975 Arthur K. Wheelock Jr. was appointed curator of northern baroque paintings at the National Gallery of Art. During his nearly 40 years in the position, Wheelock has cared for, cultivated, and strengthened the Dutch and Flemish paintings collection. He has also fostered an impressive exhibition program, including Anthony van Dyck (1990), Johannes Vermeer: The Art of Painting (1999), Rembrandt’s Late Religious Portraits (2005), Jan Lievens: A Dutch Master Rediscovered (2008), and Judith Leyster (1609-1660) (2009). In this lecture recorded on December 15, 2013, Wheelock shares the history of the Dutch and Flemish collection and special exhibitions while looking toward the future of curatorial responsibility.

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Audio
DJ Spooky: A Civil War Symphony
Released: December 03, 2013
(58:52 minutes)

Paul D. Miller (a.k.a. DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid), composer, multimedia artist, writer, and DJ; accompanied by cellist Danielle Cho, violinist Jennifer Kim and vocalist Rochelle Rice. In this performance recorded on November 24, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art, Paul D. Miller (a.k.a. DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid) presents a composition for string ensemble with live-mixed electronic music and video. DJ Spooky: A Civil War Symphony, originally performed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, borrows images from the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial. On view through January 20, 2014, the exhibition considers the legacy of the 54th and the Battle of Fort Wagner in art, examining nineteenth-century efforts to memorialize those who fought, Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial itself, and the continuing inspiration that the regiment, its defining battle, and the Shaw Memorial have been for twentieth- and twenty-first-century artists.

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Audio
Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial
Released: October 01, 2013
(55:01 minutes)

Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art; Nancy Anderson, curator and head of the department of American and British paintings, National Gallery of Art; Lindsay Harris, research associate, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art; Renée Ater, associate professor of art history and director of academic programs, University of Maryland, College Park. To celebrate the exhibition opening of Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial on September 15, 2013, the curators and catalogue authors discuss the individual stories and photographic portraits of the soldiers in the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, as well as those of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them. On view through January 20, 2014, the exhibition considers the legacy of the 54th and the Battle of Fort Wagner in art, examining nineteenth century efforts to memorialize those who fought, including early works by African American artists Edward Bannister and Edmonia Lewis in addition to Saint-Gaudens’ development of the Shaw Memorial itself. The lecture concludes with the continuing inspiration that the 54th, its defining battle, and the Shaw Memorial have been for twentieth and twenty-first century artists as diverse as Richard Benson, Ed Hamilton, Lewis Hine, Carrie Mae Weems, and William Earle Williams.

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Video
National Gallery Builds
Released: August 13, 2013
(12:43 minutes)

This film highlights the East Building's architectural conception and construction, beginning with the challenge initially faced by architect I. M. Pei. Documentation of construction includes footage of the works of art commissioned for the building.

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Audio
Saving Italy: The Monuments Men, Nazis, and War
Released: May 21, 2013
(68:41 minutes)

Robert Edsel, author and founder and president, Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art.

In August 1943, on the eve of the Allied invasion of Italy, Allied bombs threatened Michelangelo's David and nearly destroyed Leonardo da Vinci's The Last Supper. In this lecture, recorded on May 19, 2013 at the National Gallery of Art, best-selling author of The Monuments Men Robert M. Edsel tells the blockbuster story of the race to save the world's greatest masterpieces. Edsel's new book, Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis, follows Monuments officers as they search for the location of billions of dollars of missing artwork taken from the great museums in Florence and Naples.

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Audio
Inside Photography: The Role of Art in Diplomacy
Released: May 07, 2013
(51:22 minutes)

Tina Barney, artist; Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art; Sarah Lewis, art historian, author and curator; Clifford Ross, artist; and Robert Storr, dean of the Yale School of Art, chairman of FAPE’s Professional Fine Arts Advisors, and consulting curator of modern and contemporary art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

In collaboration with the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE), the National Gallery of Art hosted a panel discussion on the role of art in diplomacy on April 30, 2013. The panelists—Sarah Greenough, Sarah Lewis, and Robert Storr—present an overview of FAPE’s photography collection in American embassies around the world. Tina Barney discusses her recent gift to FAPE, and Clifford Ross reviews the photographs acquired by FAPE for display at the US Mission to the United Nations in New York as well as recent projects in China.

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Video
Jazz in the Garden
Released: May 01, 2013
(1:05 minutes)

The Jazz in the Garden Series begins its 13th season May 24. The free concert series features an array of jazz artists performing a wide variety of styles—including salsa, blusion, xylophone, and Afrofunk—every Friday evening from 5:00 to 8:30 at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden.

Guests may purchase food and beverages from the Pavilion Café and its carts located around the Garden or bring their own picnics. Alcoholic beverages may not be brought to the premises from outside and are subject to confiscation. Security officers reserve the right to inspect all items brought into the Sculpture Garden. For the safety of visitors and works of art, access to the Sculpture Garden will be limited if the space becomes too crowded.

Concerts may be cancelled due to excessive heat or inclement weather.

To learn more about Jazz in the Garden concerts and performers, please call (202) 289-3360.

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Video
Ames-Haskell Azalea Collection
Released: March 18, 2013
(1:27 minutes)

On view in the early spring of each year, the Gallery's Ames-Haskell Azalea Collection can be seen in the rotunda of the West Building. This beautiful collection of living art includes a wide variety of specimens that bloom colorfully for several weeks.

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