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Provenance

William Angerstein [b. 1811], Woodlands, Blackheath, Kent [England] (anon. [Angerstein] sale, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, 20 June 1874, no. 109), bought by (Henry Graves & Co.), London. William Stuart Stirling-Crawfurd [d. 1883], Milton, Lanark; bequeathed to his wife, the Hon. Caroline Agnes [c. 1816-1894], previously Duchess of Montrose (sale, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, 4 May 1895, no. 84), bought by McLean,[1] who sold it to (Shepherd Brothers), London. (Avery), from whom it was purchased 1895 by P.A.B. Widener, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. Inheritance from the Estate of Peter A.B. Widener by gift through power of appointment of Joseph E. Widener, Elkins Park, 1942.

Bibliography
1915
Roberts, William. Pictures in the Collection of P.A.B. Widener at Lynnewood Hall, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania: British and Modern French Schools, Philadelphia, 1915: unpaginated, repro., as by Sir joshua Reynolds.
1923
Paintings in the Collection of Joseph Widener at Lynnewood Hall. Intro. by Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, 1923: unpaginated, repro., as by Sir Joshua Reynolds.
1931
Paintings in the Collection of Joseph Widener at Lynnewood Hall. Intro. by Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, 1931: 28, repro., as by Sir Joshua Reynolds.
1942
Works of Art from the Widener Collection. Foreword by David Finley and John Walker. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1942: 6, as by Sir Joshua Reynolds.
1985
European Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1985: 350, repro.
1992
Hayes, John. British Paintings of the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1992: 224-225, repro. 225.
Technical Summary

The medium-weight canvas is plain woven; it has been lined. The ground is white, of moderate thickness. The painting is broadly executed in thick, opaque layers; the paint is blended wet into wet in the flesh tones, but more loosely and sketchily applied over dried underlayers elsewhere; the texture of the paint is not descriptive of the material depicted and the brushwork is generalized. The picture is abraded overall, apparently by overcleaning, and there is extensive retouching, notably in the flesh tones; the background darks are extensively reglazed. The thick, pigmented natural resin varnish has discolored yellow to a significant degree.