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Upcoming Exhibitions

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, April 14–September 15, 2019

American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz.

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings will present some 25 paintings created over the past 15 years, many of which will be shown publicly for the first time. Jackson's often large-scale paintings blend figural elements of bodies pointing, kneeling, drawing, and playing instruments with colorful abstract compositions and vigorously worked surfaces. Each painting creates a space and world of its own, captivating viewers and challenging them to spend time with the mesmerizing works. Born in St. Louis, Jackson taught at California State College, Sacramento, for many years and now lives and works in Oakland, California.

The exhibition is curated by Harry Cooper, senior curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation. Proudly sponsored by Morgan Stanley. Additional funding is provided by The Tower Project of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Oliver Lee Jackson, Triptych, 2015, applied fabric, mixed media on panel, 95 in. x 72 inches each, photo by Philip Maisel

 

Thomas Charles Farrer, 'Mount Tom', 1865, oil on canvas, John Wilmerding Collection, Promised Gift


The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists

National Gallery of Art, Washington, April 14-July 21, 2019

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819-1900), the most influential art critic of the Victorian era, the Gallery will present more than 80 paintings, watercolors, and drawings created by American artists who were profoundly influenced by Ruskin's call for a revolutionary change in the practice of art. The exhibition includes a number of recently discovered works never before exhibited publicly. Ruskin's rejection of traditional academic art and his plea for works that reflected a deep reverence for both the spiritual and scientific qualities of the natural world found a sympathetic audience in America among a group of like-minded artists, architects, scientists, critics, and collectors. New research, included in the exhibition catalog, reveals that the members of the Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art sought reform not only in the practice of art, but also in the broader political arena. Members of the group followed Ruskin's dictum to record the natural world with strict fidelity, but they also created works that often include a rich political subtext.

The exhibition is curated by Linda S. Ferber, museum director emerita and senior art historian at the New-York Historical Society, with Nancy K. Anderson, curator and head of the department of American and British paintings at the National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington. The exhibition is made possible through support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation.

Caption: Thomas Charles Farrer, Mount Tom, 1865, oil on canvas, John Wilmerding Collection, Promised Gift

 

Unknown Artist, 'Deer Bearing Symbols of the Kasuga Deities', Nanboku-chō period, 14th century, bronze, Hosomi Museum

The Life of Animals in Japanese Art
National Gallery of Art, Washington, June 2–August 18, 2019

Artworks representing animals—real or imaginary, religious or secular—span the full breadth and splendor of Japanese artistic production. As the first exhibition devoted to the subject, The Life of Animals in Japanese Art covers 16 centuries (from the sixth century to the present day) and a wide variety of media—sculpture, painting, lacquerwork, ceramics, metalwork, textile, and the woodblock print. A selection of some 315 works, drawn from Japanese and American public and private collections, includes seven that are designated as Important Cultural Property by the Japanese government. The artists represented range from Sesson Shūkei, Itō Jakuchū, Soga Shōhaku, Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, to Okamoto Tarō, Kusama Yayoi, Issey Miyake, Nara Yoshitomo, and Murakami Takashi.

Covering 18,000 square feet in the East Building Concourse, the exhibition is organized into thematic sections that explore the various roles animals have played in the art of Japan. A fully illustrated catalog is being published in association with Princeton University Press.

The exhibition is curated by Robert T. Singer, curator and department head, Japanese art, LACMA, and Masatomo Kawai, director, Chiba City Museum of Art, in consultation with a team of esteemed of Japanese art historians.

Co-organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the Japan Foundation, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), with special cooperation from the Tokyo National Museum. LACMA is presenting an abbreviated version of the exhibition, titled Every Living Thing: Animals in Japanese Art from September 22 through December 8, 2019. Made possible through the generous support of the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Unknown Artist, Deer Bearing Symbols of the Kasuga Deities, Nanboku-chō period, 14th century, bronze, Hosomi Museum

 

Loewy et Puiseux, 'Photographie Lunaire Rayonnement de Tycho - Phase Croissante', 1899, photogravure, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon and Patrons' Permanent Fund

By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs from the 1850s to Apollo 11
National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 14, 2019-January 5, 2020

The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. An exhibition of some 50 works will include a selection of photographs from the unmanned Ranger, Surveyor, and Lunar Orbiter missions that led up to Apollo 11. The landmark event will be represented by glass stereographs, taken on the moon by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, showing close-up views of three-centimeter-square areas of the lunar surface, as well as iconic NASA and press photographs of the astronauts that were disseminated widely in the wake of the mission's success. Additionally, a select survey of lunar photographs from the 19th and early 20th centuries features works ranging from Walter de la Rue's 1850s glass stereograph of the full moon to a suite of Charles Le Morvan's rich, velvety photogravures from Carte photographique et systematique de la lune, published in 1914, which attempted to systematically map the entire visible lunar surface. These photographs, from the 19th century to the "space-age" 1960s, merged art and science and transformed the way that we envision and comprehend the cosmos.

The exhibition is curated by Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Loewy et Puiseux, Photographie Lunaire Rayonnement de Tycho - Phase Croissante, 1899, photogravure, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon and Patrons' Permanent Fund

 

William Edward Kilburn, 'Queen Victoria with her oldest children', January 19, 1852, daguerreotype with applied color, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund

The Eye of the Sun:
Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 8–December 1, 2019

On the 180th anniversary of photography's introduction to the world in 1839, an exhibition of some 170 photographs offers an in-depth look at the development of the medium throughout its first 50 years. The Eye of the Sun draws from the Gallery's rich holdings of 19th-century photographs and features many works which have not been on view previously, including several photographs recently acquired from Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro.

The exhibition is organized chronologically and thematically, beginning with the earliest photographs in the collection by one of photography's inventors, William Henry Fox Talbot, and several examples of daguerreotypes, and ending with photographs made in 1889 by the Kodak, the first snapshot camera. Sections focus on themes of portraiture and self-presentation; landscape; the built environment; travel abroad and on the frontier; war; and photography and art. Among the photographers featured are Hill and Adamson, Mary Dillwyn, Roger Fenton, Francis Frith, Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, Gustave Le Gray, Charles Marville, Charles Nègre, Edouard Baldus, Andrew Russell, Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, and John Moran.

The exhibition is curated by Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Trellis Fund.

Caption: William Edward Kilburn, Queen Victoria with her oldest children, January 19, 1852, daguerreotype with applied color, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2018.145.13

 

Andrea del Verrocchio, 'Putto Poised on a Globe', c. 1480, unbaked clay, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence
Palazzo Strozzi and Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence, February 21-July 7, 2019
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 15, 2019-January 12, 2020

Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435-1488) was one of the most versatile, skilled, and inventive artists of the Italian Renaissance. In addition to creating exceptional works in all media-sculpture, painting, drawing, goldsmith work, architecture, and even engineering-Verrocchio also led one of the most vibrant workshops of the Renaissance, and taught artists who would go on to become some of the greatest painters of the period. Together with Florence's Museo Nazionale del Bargello and Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, the Gallery will present the first monographic Verrocchio exhibition. This rare exhibition will feature some 40 sculptures, paintings, and drawings by Verrocchio in addition to works created with or by students including Leonardo da Vinci, Lorenzo di Credi, and Domenico Ghirlandaio. New technical study of Verrocchio's work will shed light on the artist's innovative working process. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the landmark exhibition.

The exhibition was conceived by the late Eleonora Luciano, associate curator of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and is curated by Andrew Butterfield, with the collaboration of Gretchen Hirschauer, associate curator, department of Italian paintings, National Gallery of Art, Washington; Alison Luchs, curator of early European sculpture and deputy head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington; and Dylan Smith, Robert H. Smith research conservator, department of object conservation, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art in collaboration with the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, and the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence. Bank of America is a proud sponsor of the exhibition. Generous support has been kindly provided by the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Fund.

Caption: Andrea del Verrocchio, Putto Poised on a Globe, c. 1480, unbaked clay, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

 

Alonso Berruguete, 'Study of Levi', c. 1526-1532, pen and brown ink, Art Institute of Chicago, The Leonora Hall Gurley Memorial Collection

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 13, 2019-February 17, 2020
Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, March 29-July 26, 2020

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain will be the first major exhibition held outside Spain to celebrate the expressive art of the most important sculptor active on the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 16th century, Alonso Berruguete. The exhibition will present an impressive range of more than 40 works from across his career, including examples of his earliest paintings from his time in Italy, where he trained. His abilities as draftsman will also be celebrated with the largest group of his drawings ever to be assembled. The primary focus will be on his painted sculptures in wood, which generally decorated large altarpieces, or retablos. The Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid, Spain, will be lending a substantial group of some of his very best figures. A section of one of his altarpieces will be loosely reconstructed in the exhibition to convey an idea of how his sculptures were originally seen.

The exhibition is curated by C. D. Dickerson III, curator and head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be the first general book on Berruguete published in English and will feature essays by Dickerson as well as Manuel Arias Martínez, deputy director, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, and Mark McDonald, curator of Italian, Spanish, Mexican, and early French prints and illustrated books, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Fund. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Alonso Berruguete, Study of Levi, c. 1526–1532, pen and brown ink, Art Institute of Chicago, The Leonora Hall Gurley Memorial Collection

 

Current Exhibitions

Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice
Palazzo Ducale, Venice, September 7–January 6, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 24–July 7, 2019

In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the birth of Jacopo Tintoretto (1518/1519-1594), the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia with the special cooperation of the Gallerie dell'Accademia, will organize a major exhibition on the Venetian master. Following its opening at the Palazzo Ducale, Venice, beginning in September 2018, Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice will travel to the Gallery—its only other venue—from March 10 through June 30, 2019. As the first retrospective of the artist in North America, the exhibition will include many significant international loans traveling to the U.S. for the first time. The exhibition will feature nearly 50 paintings and more than a dozen works on paper spanning the artist's entire career and ranging from regal portraits of Venetian aristocracy to religious and mythological narrative scenes.

The exhibition curators are Tintoretto experts Robert Echols, independent scholar, and Frederick Ilchman, chair of the Art of Europe department and Mrs. Russell W. Baker Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. While Tintoretto was considered one of the "Big Three" 16th-century Venetian painters alongside Titian and Paolo Veronese during his lifetime and in the succeeding centuries, works by Tintoretto's assistants and followers have frequently been misattributed to the master. Echols and Ilchman are widely responsible for a new and more accurate understanding of Tintoretto's oeuvre and chronology, first explored in the Museo del Prado's Tintoretto exhibition in 2007. A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be published in English and Italian and include a range essays by the curators and other leading scholars as well as new research and scientific studies of Tintoretto's work.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia with the special collaboration of the Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice.
 
The exhibition is made possible in part by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art. Save Venice provided significant funding for conservation in support of the exhibition. The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Caption: Jacopo Tintoretto, Self-Portrait, c. 1588, oil on canvas, overall: 63 × 52 cm (24 13/16 × 20 1/2 in.) framed: 93.5 × 84.5 cm (36 13/16 × 33 1/4 in.), Musée du Louvre- Départment des Peintures

 

Tintoretto? and Workshop, Study of Michelangelo's Samson and the Philistines (recto and verso), c. 1560–1570, charcoal and black chalk with white opaque watercolor on blue paper
overall: 44.3 x 28.5 cm (17 7/16 x 11 1/4 in.) framed: 73 x 56.5 x 5.4 cm (28 3/4 x 22 1/4 x 2 1/8 in.). The Morgan Library & Museum, New York. Thaw Collection

Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, October 12, 2018–January 6, 2019
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 24–June 9, 2019

The first exhibition to focus specifically on Tintoretto's work as a draftsman, Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice provides new ideas about his evolution as a draftsman, about the dating and function of the so-called "sculpture drawings," and about Tintoretto's place in the Venetian tradition.

The exhibition begins with drawings by Tintoretto's predecessors and contemporaries, including Titian, Veronese, and Jacopo Bassano, to show his sources as well as his individuality. Tintoretto's distinctive figure drawings are the heart of the show, which includes both preparatory drawings and a group of his studies after sculptures by Michelangelo and others that document the teaching practice in Tintoretto's workshop. The exhibition also considers artists whose drawing style was influenced by Tintoretto's, particularly his son Domenico Tintoretto and Palma Giovane. A final section of the exhibition considers an interesting group of drawings—always connected with Tintoretto and his followers—that has recently been proposed as the work of the young El Greco, dating from his time in Venice.

An accompanying catalog will be written by John Marciari, the Charles W. Engelhard Curator and head of the department of drawings and prints at The Morgan Library & Museum. The exhibition will be coordinated in Washington by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice is organized by the Morgan Library & Museum, New York.

Caption: Tintoretto(?) and Workshop, Study of Michelangelo's Samson and the Philistines (recto and verso), c. 1560–1570, charcoal and black chalk with white opaque watercolor on blue paper overall: 44.3 x 28.5 cm (17 7/16 x 11 1/4 in.) framed: 73 x 56.5 x 5.4 cm (28 3/4 x 22 1/4 x 2 1/8 in.). The Morgan Library & Museum, New York. Thaw Collection

 

Venetian Prints in the Time of Tintoretto
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 24–June 9, 2019

Completing the panorama of Venetian art in the time Tintoretto is an exhibition that will present some 40 prints from the second half of the 16th century, ranging from the exquisite etchings of Parmigianino and his immediate followers in the Veneto, to the spectacular woodcuts of Giuseppe Scolari, most from the Gallery's own collection. They will reveal a critical source for Tintoretto's artistic formation, parallel developments toward a distinctively Venetian mannerism, and striking graphic responses to the dynamism and expressiveness of Tintoretto's style.

The exhibition curator is Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Agostino Carracci, Mercury and the Three Graces, 1589, engraving on laid paper, sheet: 20.2 x 25.7 cm (7 15/16 x 10 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

 

Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project

Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 12, 2018–April 21, 2019
West Building, Ground Floor

For more than 40 years, Dawoud Bey (b. 1953) has portrayed American youth, especially African American youth, with an unusual degree of sensitivity and complexity. Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project celebrates the recent acquisition of four large-scale photographs and one video from Bey's most important series, a deeply felt and conceptually rich monument to the victims of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963. Coinciding with the 55th anniversary of this tragedy, the exhibition focuses on how Bey represents the past through the lens of the present, pushing the boundaries of portraiture and engaging ongoing national issues of racism, violence against African Americans, and terrorism in churches. In these photographs, Bey pairs two life-sized portraits: one of a young person the same age as one of the bombing victims and another of an adult 50 years older—the child's age had he or she survived. The exhibition also features 9.15.63, a split-screen projection that juxtaposes a re-creation of a drive to the 16th Street Baptist Church filmed from the window of a moving car with views of everyday spaces, some familiar—a beauty parlor and barbershop—and others politically charged—a lunch counter and schoolroom.

This exhibition is curated by Kara Fiedorek, A. W. Mellon Curatorial Post-Doctoral Fellow in the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Dawoud Bey, Mary Parker and Caela Cowan, from The Birmingham Project, 2012, inkjet prints, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Collectors Committee and the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund

 

Special Installations

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 7, 2012–ongoing

One of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands―acquired over the course of four decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman―was promised to the National Gallery of Art in October 2010. This permanent installation on the Ground Floor of the West Building highlights nearly 100 examples of the Kaufmans' early American furniture and decorative arts, presented with a selection of porcelains as well as watercolors by Pierre Joseph Redouté also from the Kaufman Collection. National Gallery paintings by such celebrated American artists as Gilbert Stuart are integrated into the display. The Kaufman gift dramatically transforms the Gallery's collection, augmenting its fine holdings of European decorative arts with equally important American works of art, and it is the first major display of early American decorative arts on continual public view in the nation's capital.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

 

Touring Exhibitions

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 4, 2018–February 18, 2019
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, March 23–June 9, 2019
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, August 31–December 29, 2019
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, February 1–April 26, 2020

During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912-2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decades of Parks’s 60-year career are the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 120 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Bank of America is proud to be the national sponsor of Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950.

Generous support has also been kindly provided by the Trellis Fund.

The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art also contributed support

Caption: Gordon Parks, Washington, D.C. Government charwoman (American Gothic), 1942, gelatin silver print, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation

 

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 4–May 28, 2018
Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, June 30–September 23, 2018
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, November 20, 2018–February 10, 2019
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 3–May 27, 2019
Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris, June 17 –September 22, 2019
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, October 19, 2019 –January 12, 2020

For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 125 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann's artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann's powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann's art; her family photographs; contemporary representations of the black body; the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory; and Mann's debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts

The exhibition is supported by a generous grant from the Trellis Fund. Additional support is provided by Sally Engelhard Pingree and The Charles Engelhard Foundation.

Caption: Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled, (Scarred Tree), 1998, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. © 2016 Sally Mann

 

Horace Pippin, 'Interior', 1944, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

Outliers and American Vanguard Art
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, June 24–September 30, 2018
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, November 18, 2018–March 18, 2019

Some 250 works explore three distinct periods in American history when mainstream and outlier artists intersected, ushering in new paradigms based on inclusion, integration, and assimilation. The exhibition aligns work by such diverse artists as Charles Sheeler, Christina Ramberg, and Matt Mullican with both historic folk art and works by self-taught artists ranging from Horace Pippin to Janet Sobel and Joseph Yoakum. It also examines a recent influx of radically expressive work made on the margins that redefined the boundaries of the mainstream art world, while challenging the very categories of "outsider" and "self-taught." Historicizing the shifting identity and role of this distinctly American version of modernism's "other," the exhibition probes assumptions about creativity, artistic practice, and the role of the artist in contemporary culture. A fully illustrated catalog accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Lynne Cooke, senior curator, special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

The exhibition is made possible by a generous gift from the Smith-Kogod Family.

Caption: Horace Pippin, Interior, 1944, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

 

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The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are at all times free to the public. They are located on the National Mall between 3rd and 9th Streets at Constitution Avenue NW, and are open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Gallery is closed on December 25 and January 1. For information call (202) 737-4215 or visit the Gallery's Web site at www.nga.gov. Follow the Gallery on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalGalleryofArt, Twitter at www.twitter.com/ngadc, and Instagram at http://instagram.com/ngadc.

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