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Upcoming Exhibitions

Raphael, The Prophets Hosea and Jonah, c. 1510, pen and brown ink with brown wash over charcoal and blind stylus, heightened with white gouache and squared for transfer with blind stylus and red chalk, on laid paper, overall: 26.2 x 20 cm (10 5/16 x 7 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Armand Hammer Collection

Raphael and His Circle
(Postponed) National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 16–June 14, 2020

Raphael (1483–1520) was one of the greatest artistic figures working in the Western classical tradition. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of his death, the Gallery presents 25 prints and drawings in an intimate installation. The works will illustrate how the combination of artistic traditions, wide range, and immediate influence of Raphael’s art shaped the standard of aesthetic excellence for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. The exhibition features four drawings by Raphael: the sheet from which the design of his painting Saint George and the Dragon (c. 1506, National Gallery of Art) was transferred; the cartoon for the so-called Belle Jardinière (La Vierge à l'Enfant avec le petit saint Jean-Baptiste, 1507 or 1508, Louvre Museum, Paris); a detailed representation of the prophets Hosea and Jonah; and a well-known study for part of the frescoes in the church of Santa Maria della Pace in Rome. Nine drawings by his closest collaborators and followers—Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, and Perino del Vaga—are also on view. The exhibition includes 10 engravings, as well as a chiaroscuro woodcut, by the earliest interpreters of Raphael’s designs: Marcantonio Raimondi and his followers Agostino Veneziano and Marco Dente da Ravenna as well as Ugo da Carpi. The Gallery’s five paintings by Raphael—the largest and most important group outside a few European collections—represent the central decade of his activity and will be on view on the main floor of the West Building to complement this exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Raphael, The Prophets Hosea and Jonah, c. 1510, pen and brown ink with brown wash over charcoal and blind stylus, heightened with white gouache and squared for transfer with blind stylus and red chalk, on laid paper, overall: 26.2 x 20 cm (10 5/16 x 7 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Armand Hammer Collection

 

Lynda Benglis, Phool, 1980, plaster, bronze wire, and gold leaf, National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, Patrons' Permanent Fund and Gift of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel

Lynda Benglis
(Postponed)
March 22, 2020–January 24, 2021

In the late 1960s, American artist Lynda Benglis (b. 1941) expanded the boundaries traditionally assigned to media and gender with her bold, physical, and tactile works. Since then, Benglis's endless innovation has made her a critical figure who has bridged and influenced several generations of artists. An exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, brings together sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, and videos by Benglis from the Gallery's collection, the majority of which were given by Dorothy and Herbert Vogel. Made between 1966 and 2003, the 33 works reveal how Benglis has forged new forms by constantly exploring different techniques, materials, and mediums.

The exhibition is organized by Molly Donovan, curator of contemporary art, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption; Lynda Benglis, Phool, 1980, plaster, bronze wire, and gold leaf, National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund, Patrons' Permanent Fund and Gift of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel

 

Ilse Bing, Self-Portrait with Leica, 1931, gelatin silver print, Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg

The New Woman Behind the Camera
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 14–May 31, 2021
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, July 12–November 7, 2021

The New Woman of the 1920s was a powerful expression of modernity, a global phenomenon that embodied an ideal of female empowerment based on real women making revolutionary changes. Featuring more than 120 photographers from over 20 countries, this groundbreaking exhibition explores how women emerged as a driving force in modern photography from the 1920s to the 1950s, bringing their own perspectives to artistic experimentation, studio portraiture, fashion and advertising work, scenes of urban life, ethnography, and photojournalism. Photographers include Berenice Abbott, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Madame d'Ora, Florence Henri, Elizaveta Ignatovich, Germaine Krull, Dorothea Lange, Dora Maar, Niu Weiyu, Eslanda Goode Robeson, Tsuneko Sasamoto, Gerda Taro, and Homai Vyarawalla.

The exhibition is curated by Andrea Nelson, associate curator in the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation has provided major support for this exhibition. Trellis Fund also kindly provided a leadership gift for this exhibition.

Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art and the Phillip and Edith Leonian Foundation.

Caption: Ilse Bing, Self-Portrait with Leica, 1931, gelatin silver print, image: 26.67 x 30.48 cm (10 1/2 x 12 in.). Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg

 

Anonymous (United States), Jessie Tarbox Beals at work in front of the Austrian Government Building at the Louisiana Purchase Exhibition, 1904, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art Library, Department of Image Collections

In the Library: Women Photographers
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 15–May 31, 2021

A new installation of some 30 photographs ranging from cabinet cards to digital prints from the National Gallery of Art Library's department of image collections will explore the rise of women photographers from the late 19th century to the present day. It begins with a group of photographs of Gertrude Käsebier and other women artists who became part of Alfred Stieglitz's Photo-Secession and ends with a recent self-portrait of Amy Blakemore. Among the artists featured in the installation are Jessie Tarbox Beals, Margaret Bourke-White, Imogen Cunningham, Judy Dater, Laura Gilpin, Lillian Baynes Griffin, Lotte Jacobi, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Vivian Maier, and Sarah Choate Sears. An example of a Rolleiflex camera will also be displayed.

The installation is curated by Gregory P. J. Most, chief of the department of image collections, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Caption: Anonymous (United States), Jessie Tarbox Beals at work in front of the Austrian Government Building at the Louisiana Purchase Exhibition, 1904, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art Library, Department of Image Collections

 

Vittore Carpaccio, Two Women on a Balcony, c. 1492/1494, oil on panel, Musei Civici Veneziani, Museo Correr, Venice

Vittore Carpaccio: Master Storyteller of Renaissance Venice
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 21–June 20, 2021
Palazzo Ducale, Venice, July 24–October 24, 2021

A leading figure in the art of Renaissance Venice, Vittore Carpaccio (c. 1460/1466–1525/1526) is best known for his large, spectacular narrative paintings that brought sacred history to life. Although for centuries he has been loved and celebrated in his native city for his observant eye, fertile imagination, and storytelling prowess, this exhibition marks the first retrospective of the artist ever held outside Italy. In a focused selection of some 45 paintings and 30 drawings, large-scale canvases painted for charitable societies will be seen alongside smaller works that originally decorated the homes of prosperous Venetians. Some of the paintings, notably two celebrated canvases from the Scuola degli Schiavoni in Venice, and the Gallery's own The Virgin Reading (c. 1505),have been newly conserved for the occasion. The drawings, characterized by a marvelous freshness of invention, include sketches for complete compositions as well as meticulously observed studies for individual figures. A fully illustrated catalog with essays by the curators and other leading scholars will explore the full range of Carpaccio's creativity.

The exhibition is curated by Peter Humfrey, internationally recognized scholar of 15th- and 16th-century Venetian painting and professor emeritus of art history at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, in collaboration with Andrea Bellieni, director, Museo Correr, Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia, and Gretchen Hirschauer, curator of Italian and Spanish painting at the National Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Musei Civici di Venezia.

Image: Vittore Carpaccio, Two Women on a Balcony, c. 1492/1494, oil on panel, overall: 94.5 x 63.5 cm (37 3/16 x 25 in.), Musei Civici Veneziani, Museo Correr, Venice

 

Athena Tacha, Pocket booklets set, Oberlin, OH; Washington, DC, 1972–2015, National Gallery of Art Library, David K. E. Bruce Fund

In the Library: Time/Travel through Artists' Books
National Gallery of Art, Washington, June 7–September 16, 2021

The National Gallery of Art Library will present a selection of some 20 artists' books from its collection, all made by women over the past 45 years. The installation will explore the universal themes of time and travel through the work of artists with a variety of practices. Artists’ books from Julie Chen, Jill O’Bryan, Clarissa Sligh, and Athena Tacha, among others, range from elaborately handcrafted to decisively minimalist, photographed to drawn, and global to personal.

The installation is curated by Sarah Osborne Bender, head of library technical services, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Caption: Athena Tacha, Athena Tacha Pocket Booklets Set, Oberlin, OH: Athena Tacha, 1972–2015, National Gallery of Art Library, David K. E. Bruce Fund

 

Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, 'Adoration of the Shepherds', 1645, oil on canvas, Genova, Fondazione Spinola, Chiesa di San Luca, Copyright Scala / Art Resource, NY

A Superb Baroque: Art in Genoa, 1600–1750
Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome, March 25–August 1, 2021
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 26, 2021–January 9, 2021

By the 17th century, Genoa was the banking center of Europe with a functioning republican government and enormous wealth that enabled its artists and their patrons to create a singularly rich and beautiful expression of baroque style, with works of extraordinary material sumptuousness, visual splendor, and exuberant feeling. The first major presentation of the Genoese baroque in the United States, this landmark exhibition—accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog—presents some 130 paintings, sculptures, decorative arts, drawings, and prints ranging from 1600 through 1750.

Forming the core of the exhibition are works by the school’s well-known painters—Bernardo Strozzi, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, and Alessandro Magnasco—as well as key works by other Italians and foreigners drawn to the city’s flourishing environment—Peter Paul Rubens, Giulio Cesare Procaccini, Orazio Gentileschi, Anthony van Dyck, and Francesco Solimena. Some of the very finest works by such native painters as Valerio Castello, Domenico Piola, and Gregorio De Ferrari are also on view. Monumental decorative ensembles from churches and residences are represented by corresponding oil sketches and presentation models, several grand in scale themselves. Also included are full-size statues by masters—Pierre Puget, Filippo Parodi, and Anton Maria Maragliano—terracotta sketches, and exquisite bronze repetitions of monumental groups, as well as spectacular ceremonial silver from early in the period.

Among the drawings and prints featured are many by the same artists who executed the paintings and objects, with some connected to them. These works reveal the striking characteristics of Genoese draftsmanship: complex techniques, pictorial elaboration, and autonomous function. In fantasy and fluency, the etchings—particularly those of Castiglione and Bartolomeo Biscaino—surpass those of any other Italian school.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings National Gallery of Art; Piero Boccardo, superintendent of collections for the City of Genoa; and Franco Boggero, director of historic and artistic heritage at the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio, Genoa.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome, with special cooperation from the City and Museums of Genoa

Made possible by the Robert Lehman Foundation

Additional funding provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art

Caption: Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, The Adoration of the Shepherds, 1645, oil on canvas, overall: 398 x 218 cm (156 11/16 x 85 13/16 in.), Genoa, Fondazione Spinola, Chiesa di San Luca © Scala / Art Resource, NY


 

Simon de Vlieger, Estuary at Day's End, c. 1640/1645, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund and The Lee and Juliet Folger Fund in memory of Kathrine Dulin Folger

Clouds, Ice, and Bounty: The Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Collection of Seventeenth-Century Dutch and Flemish Paintings
October 17, 2021–February 27, 2022

Depicting a rich cross section of 17th-century Dutch and Flemish life and culture, this exhibition brings together 25 paintings acquired through the generosity of the Lee and Juliet Folger Fund over the past two decades, supplemented by one painting from Lee and Juliet Folger’s personal collection. Assembled with care and passion, the collection includes landscapes by Jacob van Ruisdael and Salomon van Ruysdael, winter scenes by Jan van Goyen and Adam van Breen, genre paintings by Dirck Hals and Caspar Netscher, seascapes by Reinier Nooms and Simon de Vlieger, still lifes by Clara Peeters and Frans Snyders, and portraits by Thomas de Keyser and Jan Miense Molenaer. Seen together, this collection offers a unique opportunity to enjoy some of the finest productions of Dutch and Flemish artists of the 17th century. A fully illustrated catalog will consider composition and technique as well as the broader historical context of each work.

The exhibition is curated by Marjorie Wieseman, curator and head of the department of northern European paintings.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Image: Simon de Vlieger, Estuary at Day's End, c. 1640/1645, oil on panel, overall: 36.8 x 58.4 cm (14 1/2 x 23 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund and The Lee and Juliet Folger Fund in memory of Kathrine Dulin Folger

 

James McNeill Whistler, Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl, 1862, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Harris Whittemore Collection

The Woman in White: Joanna Hiffernan and James McNeill Whistler
Royal Academy of Arts, London, February 23–May 23, 2022
National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 3–October 10, 2022

The American-born artist James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) and Irish-born model Joanna Hiffernan (1839–1886) met in 1860 and began a close professional and personal relationship that lasted for two decades. Bringing together for the first time nearly all of Whistler’s depictions of Hiffernan, The Woman in White explores their partnership and the iconic works of art resulting from their life together. Featuring approximately 60 paintings, drawings, and prints, and related ephemera, the show unites one of the Gallery’s most renowned works—Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl—with the second and third “Symphonies in White,” from Tate Britain and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, respectively. The exhibition will also present a selection of paintings on the Victorian theme of the woman in white by several of Whistler’s fellow artists, including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, John Singer Sargent, and Fernand Khnopff. These works will help to situate Whistler’s depictions of Hiffernan among the late 19th-century currents of realism, classicism, aestheticism, and symbolism in Europe and America while addressing the question of how Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl came to occupy its unique place in the history of art.

The exhibition has been curated by Margaret F. MacDonald, professor of art history, University of Glasgow, in collaboration with Ann Dumas, curator, Royal Academy of Arts, and consulting curator of European art, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Charles Brock, associate curator, department of American and British paintings, National Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.

Caption: James McNeill Whistler, Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl, 1862, oil on canvas, overall: 213 x 107.9 cm (83 7/8 x 42 1/2 in.), framed: 244.2 x 136.5 x 8.3 cm (96 1/8 x 53 3/4 x 3 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Harris Whittemore Collection, 1943.6.2

Current Exhibitions

Edgar Degas, 'The Curtain', c. 1880, pastel over charcoal and monotype on laid paper mounted on board. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Degas at the Opéra
Musée d'Orsay, Paris, September 24, 2019–January 19, 2020
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 1–October 12, 2020

An exuberant display of fecund imagination and keen observation, Edgar Degas's renowned images of the Paris Opéra are among the most sophisticated and visually compelling works he ever created. Celebrating the 350th anniversary of the Opéra's founding, Degas at the Opéra will present approximately 100 of the artist's best-known and beloved works in a range of media, including paintings, pastels, drawings, prints, and sculpture. It will be accompanied by a fully illustrated exhibition catalog.

Degas (1834–1917) is celebrated as the painter of dancers, a subject that dominated his art for nearly four decades. Although there have been many exhibitions celebrating his love of the ballet, this will be the first to consider his enduring fascination with the opera. A music lover and regular visitor to performances, Degas explored both the public spaces of the Paris Opéra—auditorium, stage, and boxes—as well as more private ones, including dance studios and backstage. He was friends with many of the people he depicted in his paintings, from dancers, singers, and orchestra musicians to the dark-suited subscribers.

The Opéra also fueled some of Degas's most daring technical innovations, including his first monotype, The Ballet Master (c. 1876), and his wax statue Little Dancer Aged Fourteen (1881), which revolutionized sculpture.

The exhibition is curated by Degas expert Henri Loyrette with Kimberly A. Jones, curator of 19th-century French paintings, National Gallery of Art; Leïla Jarbouai, graphic arts curator, Musée d'Orsay; and Marine Kisiel, curator, Musée d'Orsay.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Musées d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie, Paris.

BP America is proud to be a sponsor of this Washington, DC, exhibition as part of its support for the arts in the United States.

Adrienne Arsht also kindly provided a leadership gift for this exhibition.

Additional funding is provided by Jacqueline B. Mars and The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Caption: Edgar Degas, The Curtain, c. 1880, pastel over charcoal and monotype on laid paper mounted on board, sheet: 29 x 33.3 cm (11 7/16 x 13 1/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

 

Léon-François-Antoine Fleury, 'The Tomb of Cecaelia Metella', c. 1830, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Frank Anderson Trapp

True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780-1870
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 2–November 29, 2020
Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris, June 13–September 13, 2020
Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, October 6, 2020–January 31, 2021

An integral part of art education in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, painting en plein air was a core practice for avant-garde artists in Europe. Intrepid artists such as Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, John Constable, Simon Denis, Jules Coignet, and André Giroux—highly skilled at quickly capturing effects of light and atmosphere—made sometimes arduous journeys to paint their landscapes in person at breathtaking sites, ranging from the Baltic coast and Swiss Alps to the streets of Paris and ruins of Rome. Drawing on new scholarship, this exhibition of some 100 oil sketches made outdoors across Europe during that time includes several recently discovered works and explores issues such as attribution, chronology, and technique.

The exhibition is accompanied by a comprehensive catalog with essays by leading experts in the field and will present new information about this key aspect of European art history.

The exhibition is curated by Mary Morton, curator and head of the department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art, Washington; Ger Luijten, director, Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris; and Jane Munro, keeper of paintings, drawings and prints, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris; and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Caption: Léon-François-Antoine Fleury, The Tomb of Cecaelia Metella, c. 1830, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Frank Anderson Trapp, 2004.166.16

 

Special Installations

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 7, 2012–ongoing

One of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands―acquired over the course of four decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman―was promised to the National Gallery of Art in October 2010. This permanent installation on the Ground Floor of the West Building highlights nearly 100 examples of the Kaufmans' early American furniture and decorative arts, presented with a selection of porcelains as well as watercolors by Pierre Joseph Redouté also from the Kaufman Collection. National Gallery paintings by such celebrated American artists as Gilbert Stuart are integrated into the display. The Kaufman gift dramatically transforms the Gallery's collection, augmenting its fine holdings of European decorative arts with equally important American works of art, and it is the first major display of early American decorative arts on continual public view in the nation's capital.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

 

Touring Exhibitions

Alonso Berruguete, 'Study of Levi', c. 1526-1532, pen and brown ink, Art Institute of Chicago, The Leonora Hall Gurley Memorial Collection

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain
Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas
September 20, 2020 – January 10, 2021

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain will be the first major exhibition held outside Spain to celebrate the expressive art of the most important sculptor active on the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 16th century, Alonso Berruguete. The exhibition will present an impressive range of more than 40 works from across his career, including examples of his earliest paintings from his time in Italy, where he trained. His abilities as draftsman will also be celebrated with the largest group of his drawings ever to be assembled. The primary focus will be on his painted sculptures in wood, which generally decorated large altarpieces, or retablos. The Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid, Spain, will be lending a substantial group of some of his very best figures. A section of one of his altarpieces will be loosely reconstructed in the exhibition to convey an idea of how his sculptures were originally seen.

The exhibition is curated by C. D. Dickerson III, curator and head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Mark McDonald, curator of drawings and prints, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Curator for the Meadows Museum venue is Wendy Sepponen, Mellon Curatorial Fellow, Meadows Museum, SMU.

A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be the first general book on Berruguete published in English and will feature essays by Dickerson as well as Manuel Arias Martínez, deputy director, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, and Mark McDonald, curator of Italian, Spanish, Mexican, and early French prints and illustrated books, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas, in collaboration with the Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Fund. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Alonso Berruguete, The Sacrifice of Isaac, 1526/1532, painted wood with gilding, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid. © Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid (Spain) Photo by Javier Muñoz and Paz Pastor

 

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