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Upcoming Exhibitions

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In the Library: The Richter Archive at 75
National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 7–August 24, 2018

In celebration of the 1943 arrival of the George M. Richter Archive of Illustrations on Art—the founding collection of 60,000 photographs that formed the nucleus of the department of image collections—this installation presents the history and development of the photographic archives of the National Gallery of Art. The initial gift has evolved into one of the largest collections of images of art and architecture in the world with over 15 million images ranging from daguerreotypes to digital files.

The installation is curated by Gregory P.J. Most, chief of library image collections, National Gallery of Art, and is open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Unknown British photographer, Photo of Giorgione's The Adoration of the Shepherds (1505/1510) while in the collection of Lord Allendale, c. 1937. Department of image collections, National Gallery of Art Library

 

Ludolf Backhuysen, Ships in Distress off a Rocky Coast, 1667, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

Water, Wind, and Waves: Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age
National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 1–November 25, 2018

The Dutch rose to greatness from the riches of the sea. Dutch-designed cargo ships revolutionized marine transport and helped Dutch traders become the leaders of maritime commerce, while Dutch shipyards produced warships that made the Admiralty a powerful naval force. The water, central to their economic and naval prosperity, was also a source of pleasure and enjoyment for the Dutch. In the warm summer months, dune-covered beaches offered scenic vistas, while in the winter, frozen canals provided a place for people of all ages to skate, play, and enjoy the outdoors. Within this nation of merchants, engineers, sailors, and skaters, it is no wonder marine paintings became a favorite subject for artists and collectors alike. This exhibition celebrates the essential relationship the Dutch had with water through some 45 paintings, drawings, prints, rare books, and ship models. Drawn largely from the National Gallery of Art's collection, the exhibition features works by artists such as Jan van Goyen, Jacob van Ruisdael, Aelbert Cuyp, and Willem van de Velde the Younger. Scenes range from quiet harbor views, frozen canals, and calm seas to dramatic shipwrecks and fierce naval battles, revealing the full range of marine art during the Dutch Golden Age.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

The exhibition is generously supported by the Hata Foundation and The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art

Caption: Ludolf Backhuysen, Ships in Distress off a Rocky Coast, 1667, oil on canvas, overall: 114.3 x 167.3 cm (45 x 65 7/8 in.) framed: 147.3 x 146.1 x 6.4 cm (58 x 57 1/2 x 2 1/2 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

 

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Sense of Humor
National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 15, 2018–January 6, 2019

Humor may be fundamental to human experience, but its expression in painting and sculpture has been limited. Instead, prints, as the most widely distributed medium, and drawings, as the most private, have been the natural vehicles for comic content. Drawn from the National Gallery of Art's collection, Sense of Humor celebrates this incredibly rich though easily overlooked tradition through works including Renaissance caricatures, biting English satires, and 20th-century comics. The exhibition includes major works by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Jacques Callot, William Hogarth, James Gillray, Francisco Goya, and Honoré Daumier, as well as later examples by Art Spiegelman, Richard Hamilton, Andy Warhol, John Baldessari, and the Guerrilla Girls.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon senior curator of prints and drawings; Judith Brodie, curator and head of the department of American and modern prints and drawings; and Stacey Sell, associate curator, department of old master drawings, all National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: James Gillray, Midas, Transmuting All into Paper, 1797, etching with hand-coloring in watercolor on laid paper, Wright and Evans 1851, no. 168, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Purchased as an Anonymous Gift

 

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Corot: Women
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 9–December 31, 2018

Camille Corot is best known as the great master of landscape painting in the 19th century who bridged the French neoclassical tradition with the impressionist movement of the 1870s. His figure paintings constitute a much smaller, less well-known portion of his oeuvre, but arguably are of equal importance to the history of art, in particular for the founders of modernist painting such as Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, and Georges Braque. Dressed in rustic Italian costume or stretched nude on a grassy plain, Corot's women read, dream, and gaze, conveying a mysterious sense of inner life. His sophisticated use of color and his deft, delicate touch applied to the female form resulted in pictures of quiet majesty. Corot Women both distills and expands upon the Musée Marmottan’s exhibition Corot: The Painter and His Models (February 8–July 22, 2018).

The exhibition is curated by Mary Morton, curator and head of the department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, The Fair Maid of Gascony, c. 1850, oil on canvas, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Purchased with the Drayton Hillyer Fund. Photo by Stephen Petegorsky

 

Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project

Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 12, 2018–March 17, 2019
West Building, Ground Floor

For more than 40 years, Dawoud Bey (b. 1953) has portrayed American youth, especially African American youth, with an unusual degree of sensitivity and complexity. Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project celebrates the recent acquisition of four large-scale photographs and one video from Bey's most important series, a deeply felt and conceptually rich monument to the victims of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963. Coinciding with the 55th anniversary of this tragedy, the exhibition focuses on how Bey represents the past through the lens of the present, pushing the boundaries of portraiture and engaging ongoing national issues of racism, violence against African Americans, and terrorism in churches. In these photographs, Bey pairs two life-sized portraits: one of a young person the same age as one of the bombing victims and another of an adult 50 years older—the child's age had he or she survived. The exhibition also features 9.15.63, a split-screen projection that juxtaposes a re-creation of a drive to the 16th Street Baptist Church filmed from the window of a moving car with views of everyday spaces, some familiar—a beauty parlor and barbershop—and others politically charged—a lunch counter and schoolroom.

This exhibition is curated by Kara Fiedorek, A. W. Mellon Curatorial Post-Doctoral Fellow in the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Dawoud Bey, Mary Parker and Caela Cowan, from The Birmingham Project, 2012, inkjet prints, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Collectors Committee and the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund

 

Rachel Whiteread, Ghost, 1990, plaster on steel frame, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of The Glenstone Foundation

Rachel Whiteread
Tate Britain, London, September 12, 2017–January 21, 2018
21er Haus, Vienna, March 7–July 29, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 16, 2018–January 13, 2019
Saint Louis Art Museum, March 17–June 9, 2019

As the first comprehensive survey of the work of British sculptor Rachel Whiteread (b. 1963), this exhibition brings together some 100 objects from the course of the artist's 30 year career, including drawings, photographs, architecture-scaled sculptures, archival materials, documentary materials on public projects, and several new works on view for the first time. The exhibition also features the wide range of materials utilized by the artist from plaster to rubber, concrete, resin, and paper. Ranging in scale and effect from the monumental to the modest, Whiteread's sculptures memorialize everyday objects, domestic interiors, and public spaces. Throughout her celebrated career, Whiteread has effectively recast the memories of these locations and objects to chart the seismic changes in how we live, from the late 20th century and into the 21st. Co-organized with Tate Britain, the exhibition is accompanied by a catalog with contributions by the exhibition's curators, an interview with the artist, and additional scholarly essays.

The exhibition is curated by Molly Donovan, curator of art, 1975–present, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Ann Gallagher, director of collections (British art), Tate Britain, London.

Co-organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Tate Britain, London

Supported by Amanda and Glenn Fuhrman and The FLAG Art Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Rachel Whiteread, Ghost, 1990, plaster on steel frame, overall: 269 x 355.5 x 317.5 cm (105 7/8 x 139 15/16 x 125 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of The Glenstone Foundation

 

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The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May 15–September 16, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 14, 2018–January 20, 2019

Chiaroscuro woodcuts—color prints made from the successive printing of multiple blocks—flourished in 16th-century Italy, interpreting designs by leading masters such as Raphael, Parmigianino, and Titian, while boasting extraordinary craft and their own, often striking palette. However, they remain among the least understood phenomena: exactly how were chiaroscuros created, in what sequence were they printed, and why? Based upon the most beautiful impressions in American and British collections, extensive new research, and far-reaching interpretations, this exhibition explains the chiaroscuro woodcut as an essential phenomenon, and one of the most beautiful, in the history of printmaking.

The exhibition is coordinated in Washington by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon senior curator of prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Ugo da Carpi after Parmigianino, Diogenes, c. 1527, chiaroscuro woodcut printed from four blocks: brown line block and three tone blocks in brown and green on laid paper, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund

 

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 4, 2018–February 18, 2019
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, March 23–June 16, 2019
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, August 31–December 29, 2019
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, February 1–April 26, 2020

During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912-2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decades of Parks’s 60-year career are the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 120 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Bank of America is a proud sponsor of Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950.

Generous support has also been kindly provided by the Trellis Fund.

The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art also contributed support

Caption: Gordon Parks, Washington, D.C. Government charwoman (American Gothic), 1942, gelatin silver print, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation

 

Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice
Palazzo Ducale, Venice, September 7–January 6, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 10–July 7, 2019

In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the birth of Jacopo Tintoretto (1518/1519-1594), the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia with the special cooperation of the Gallerie dell'Accademia, will organize a major exhibition on the Venetian master. Following its opening at the Palazzo Ducale, Venice, beginning in September 2018, Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice will travel to the Gallery—its only other venue—from March 10 through June 30, 2019. As the first retrospective of the artist in North America, the exhibition will include many significant international loans traveling to the U.S. for the first time. The exhibition will feature nearly 50 paintings and more than a dozen works on paper spanning the artist's entire career and ranging from regal portraits of Venetian aristocracy to religious and mythological narrative scenes.

The exhibition curators are Tintoretto experts Robert Echols, independent scholar, and Frederick Ilchman, chair of the Art of Europe department and Mrs. Russell W. Baker Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. While Tintoretto was considered one of the "Big Three" 16th-century Venetian painters alongside Titian and Paolo Veronese during his lifetime and in the succeeding centuries, works by Tintoretto's assistants and followers have frequently been misattributed to the master. Echols and Ilchman are widely responsible for a new and more accurate understanding of Tintoretto's oeuvre and chronology, first explored in the Museo del Prado's Tintoretto exhibition in 2007. A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be published in English and Italian and include a range essays by the curators and other leading scholars as well as new research and scientific studies of Tintoretto's work.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia with the special cooperation of the Gallerie dell'Accademia

Caption: Jacopo Tintoretto, Self-Portrait, c. 1588, oil on canvas, overall: 63 × 52 cm (24 13/16 × 20 1/2 in.) framed: 93.5 × 84.5 cm (36 13/16 × 33 1/4 in.), Musée du Louvre- Départment des Peintures

 

Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice
The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, October 12, 2018–January 6, 2019
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 10–May 26, 2019

The first exhibition to focus specifically on Tintoretto's work as a draftsman, Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice provides new ideas about his evolution as a draftsman, about the dating and function of the so-called "sculpture drawings," and about Tintoretto's place in the Venetian tradition.

The exhibition begins with drawings by Tintoretto's predecessors and contemporaries, including Titian, Veronese, and Jacopo Bassano, to show his sources as well as his individuality. Tintoretto's distinctive figure drawings are the heart of the show, which includes both preparatory drawings and a group of his studies after sculptures by Michelangelo and others that document the teaching practice in Tintoretto's workshop. The exhibition also considers artists whose drawing style was influenced by Tintoretto's, particularly his son Domenico Tintoretto and Palma Giovane. A final section of the exhibition considers an interesting group of drawings—always connected with Tintoretto and his followers—that has recently been proposed as the work of the young El Greco, dating from his time in Venice.

An accompanying catalog will be written by John Marciari, the Charles W. Engelhard Curator and head of the department of drawings and prints at The Morgan Library & Museum. The exhibition will be coordinated in Washington by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the Morgan Library and Museum in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Jacopo Tintoretto, Study of a Bust of Vitellius, turned slightly upwards to right, charcoal, heightened with white, on blue paper, 30.3 x 19.8 cm, The British Museum, 1885.0509.1656

 

Venetian Prints in the Time of Tintoretto
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 10–May 26, 2019

Completing the panorama of Venetian art in the time Tintoretto is an exhibition that will present some 40 prints from the second half of the 16th century, ranging from the exquisite etchings of Parmigianino and his immediate followers in the Veneto, to the spectacular woodcuts of Giuseppe Scolari, most from the Gallery's own collection. They will reveal a critical source for Tintoretto's artistic formation, parallel developments toward a distinctively Venetian mannerism, and striking graphic responses to the dynamism and expressiveness of Tintoretto's style.

The exhibition curator is Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Agostino Carracci, Mercury and the Three Graces, 1589, engraving on laid paper, sheet: 20.2 x 25.7 cm (7 15/16 x 10 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

 

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 24–September 2, 2019

American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz.

Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings will present some 25 paintings created over the past 15 years, many of which will be shown publicly for the first time. Jackson's often large-scale paintings blend figural elements of bodies pointing, kneeling, drawing, and playing instruments with colorful abstract compositions and vigorously worked surfaces. Each painting creates a space and world of its own, captivating viewers and challenging them to spend time with the mesmerizing works. Born in St. Louis, Jackson taught at California State College, Sacramento, for many years and now lives and works in Oakland, California.

The exhibition is curated by Harry Cooper, senior curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Caption: Oliver Lee Jackson, Triptych, 2015, applied fabric, mixed media on panel, 95 in. x 72 inches each, photo by Philip Maisel

 

Current Exhibitions

Unknown artist, Plate with the Plague of Phrygia (after Raphael), c. 1535/1540, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection)

Sharing Images: Renaissance Prints into Maiolica and Bronze
National Gallery of Art, Washington, April 1–August 5, 2018

Inspired by the acquisition of the important William A. Clark maiolica (glazed Italian ceramics) collection from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and drawing largely on the Gallery's newly expanded holdings, this exhibition brings together some 90 objects to highlight the impact of Renaissance prints on maiolica and bronze plaquettes, the two media most dramatically influenced by the new technology of image replication. Focusing on designs by major artists such as Andrea Mantegna, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Parmigianino, and Albrecht Dürer, the exhibition tells the story of how printed images were transmitted, transformed, and translated onto ceramics and small bronze reliefs, creating a shared visual canon across artistic media and geographical boundaries. The first exhibition of its kind in the United States, Sharing Images is accompanied by a publication that provides a comprehensive introduction to different aspects of the phenomenon, from the role of 15th-century prints and the rediscovery of ancient art to the importance of illustrated books and the artistic exchanges between Italy and northern Europe.

The exhibition is curated by Jamie Gabbarelli, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow, department of old master prints, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art

Made possible by a generous grant from the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust

Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Unknown artist, Plate with the Plague of Phrygia (after Raphael), c. 1535/1540, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 1 x 10 1/2 in. (2.54 x 26.67 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection)

 

Paul Cézanne, 'Boy in a Red Waistcoat', 1888-1890, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

Cézanne Portraits
Musée d’Orsay, Paris, June 13–September 24, 2017
National Portrait Gallery, London, October 26, 2017–February 11, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 25–July 8, 2018

Bringing together some 60 examples drawn from collections around the world, Cézanne Portraits is the first exhibition devoted to the famed post-impressionist’s portraits. The revelatory exhibition provides the first full visual account of Paul Cézanne’s portrait practice, exploring the pictorial and thematic characteristics of his works in the genre, the chronological development of his style and method, and the range and influence of his sitters. Several paintings are exclusive to the National Gallery of Art’s presentation, while some works have never before been exhibited in the United States. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays by the exhibition’s curators—John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, with Mary Morton, curator and head of the department of French paintings at the National Gallery of Art, and Xavier Rey, director of collections at the Musée d’Orsay; also included are a biographical essay on Cézanne’s sitters by biographer Alex Danchev and a chronology of the artist’s life by Jayne Warman.

The exhibition is curated by John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, with Mary Morton, curator and head of the department of French paintings at the National Gallery of Art, and Xavier Rey, director of collections at the Musée d’Orsay.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Musée d’Orsay, Paris

The exhibition, in Washington, is made possible through the generous support of the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation.

Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities

Caption: Paul Cézanne, Boy in a Red Waistcoat, 1888-1890, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

 

Nicolò Boldrini after Titian, 'Saint Francis Receiving the Stigmata', c. 1530, woodcut, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 25–July 8, 2018

The Descrizione del Sacro Monte della Vernia (1612) depicts the monastery and dramatic rocky terrain of La Verna, the site where Saint Francis received the stigmata. The gifted baroque draftsman Jacopo Ligozzi was hired to illustrate the volume and he cleverly designed overslips pasted on 5 of the 22 engraved illustrations in a before-and-­after fashion to demonstrate the changes to the topography since Saint Francis's time. Drawing on the Gallery's holdings of Franciscan imagery, spanning the 15th through the 18th centuries, this exhibition places the Descrizione del Sacro Monte della Vernia within its most significant artistic and art historical context by examining traditional representations of the experiences of Saint Francis on the mountain of La Verna and innovations on traditional Franciscan subject matter characteristic of the Counter Reformation.

The exhibition is curated by Ginger Hammer, assistant curator, department of old master prints, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Nicolo Boldrini after Titian, Saint Francis Receiving the Stigmata, c. 1530, woodcut, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund

 

Special Installations

Jackson Pollock, Mural, 1943, oil and casein on canvas, Gift of Peggy Guggenheim

Jackson Pollock's Mural
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 19, 2017–October 28, 2018

A special installation in the Gallery's East Building features Mural (1943) by Jackson Pollock, on loan from the University of Iowa Museum of Art. Originally commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim for her New York City townhouse, the early painting is Pollock's largest work at nearly 20 feet long, and represents a major turning point in the seminal artist's career and style. Also on view are paintings and works on paper by Pollock from the Gallery's collection, including Number 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist) (1950). The installation marks the debut of Mural in Washington, DC.

Caption: Jackson Pollock, Mural, 1943, oil and casein on canvas, 95 5/8 x 237 3/4 in. (242.9 x 603.9 cm), Gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1956.6, reproduced with permission from the University of Iowa

 

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 7, 2012–ongoing

One of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands―acquired over the course of four decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman―was promised to the National Gallery of Art in October 2010. This permanent installation on the Ground Floor of the West Building highlights nearly 100 examples of the Kaufmans' early American furniture and decorative arts, presented with a selection of porcelains as well as watercolors by Pierre Joseph Redouté also from the Kaufman Collection. National Gallery paintings by such celebrated American artists as Gilbert Stuart are integrated into the display. The Kaufman gift dramatically transforms the Gallery's collection, augmenting its fine holdings of European decorative arts with equally important American works of art, and it is the first major display of early American decorative arts on continual public view in the nation's capital.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

 

Touring Exhibitions

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 4–May 28, 2018
Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, June 30–September 23, 2018
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, November 20, 2018–February 10, 2019
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 3–May 27, 2019
Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris, June 17 –September 22, 2019
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, October 19, 2019 –January 12, 2020

For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 125 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann's artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann's powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann's art; her family photographs; contemporary representations of the black body; the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory; and Mann's debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts

The exhibition is supported by a generous grant from the Trellis Fund. Additional support is provided by Sally Engelhard Pingree and The Charles Engelhard Foundation.

Caption: Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled, (Scarred Tree), 1998, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. © 2016 Sally Mann

 

Horace Pippin, 'Interior', 1944, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

Outliers and American Vanguard Art
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, June 24–September 30, 2018
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, November 18, 2018–March 18, 2019

Some 250 works explore three distinct periods in American history when mainstream and outlier artists intersected, ushering in new paradigms based on inclusion, integration, and assimilation. The exhibition aligns work by such diverse artists as Charles Sheeler, Christina Ramberg, and Matt Mullican with both historic folk art and works by self-taught artists ranging from Horace Pippin to Janet Sobel and Joseph Yoakum. It also examines a recent influx of radically expressive work made on the margins that redefined the boundaries of the mainstream art world, while challenging the very categories of "outsider" and "self-taught." Historicizing the shifting identity and role of this distinctly American version of modernism's "other," the exhibition probes assumptions about creativity, artistic practice, and the role of the artist in contemporary culture. A fully illustrated catalog accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Lynne Cooke, senior curator, special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

The exhibition is made possible by a generous gift from the Smith-Kogod Family.

Caption: Horace Pippin, Interior, 1944, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin, in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

 

Caption: Michel Sittow, Portrait of Diego Guevara (?), c. 1515/1518, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Michel Sittow: Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe
Art Museum of Estonia/Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn, June 8–September 16, 2018

Undoubtedly the greatest Renaissance artist from Estonia, Michel Sittow (c. 1469–1525) was born in Reval (now Tallinn in present-day Estonia), likely studied in Bruges with Hans Memling, and worked at the courts of renowned European royals such as King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castille. Through some 20 works, representing most of Sittow's small oeuvre, the exhibition will offer an opportunity to examine his art in a broader context, including a possible collaboration with Juan de Flandes and Sittow's relationship to his Netherlandish contemporaries. The exhibition will be presented by both museums to mark the occasion of the centennial of the Estonian Republic in 2018.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn

Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Caption: Michel Sittow, Portrait of Diego Guevara (?), c. 1515/1518, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

 

Anne Truitt, 'Knight's Heritage', 1963, acrylic on wood, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Collectors Committee

In the Tower: Anne Truitt
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 19, 2017–July 8, 2018

Anne Truitt (1921–2004), one of the most original and important sculptors of the postwar era, designed simple geometric constructions fabricated in wood that she would paint in multiple layers to create abstract compositions of subtle color in three dimensions. Seven sculptures, two paintings, and five drawings form the core of a small survey that will allow viewers to appreciate Truitt's classic work from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. An accompanying brochure will feature excerpts of an interview with Truitt by James Meyer.

The exhibition is curated by James Meyer, associate curator, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Presented with support from the Tower Project of the National Gallery of Art

Caption: Anne Truitt, Knight's Heritage, 1963, acrylic on wood, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Collectors Committee

 

General Information

The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are at all times free to the public. They are located on the National Mall between 3rd and 9th Streets at Constitution Avenue NW, and are open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Gallery is closed on December 25 and January 1. For information call (202) 737-4215 or visit the Gallery's Web site at www.nga.gov. Follow the Gallery on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalGalleryofArt, Twitter at www.twitter.com/ngadc, and Instagram at http://instagram.com/ngadc.

Visitors will be asked to present all carried items for inspection upon entering. Checkrooms are free of charge and located at each entrance. Luggage and other oversized bags must be presented at the 4th Street entrances to the East or West Building to permit x-ray screening and must be deposited in the checkrooms at those entrances. For the safety of visitors and the works of art, nothing may be carried into the Gallery on a visitor's back. Any bag or other items that cannot be carried reasonably and safely in some other manner must be left in the checkrooms. Items larger than 17 by 26 inches cannot be accepted by the Gallery or its checkrooms.
 
For additional press information please call or send inquiries to:
Department of Communications
National Gallery of Art
2000B South Club Drive
Landover, MD 20785
phone: (202) 842-6353
e-mail: [email protected]
 
Anabeth Guthrie
Chief of Communications
(202) 842-6804
[email protected]

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Questions from members of the media may be directed to the Department of Communications at (202) 842-6353 or [email protected]

The public may call (202) 737-4215 or visit www.nga.gov for more information about the National Gallery of Art.

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Stay up to date with the National Gallery of Art by subscribing to our e-mail newsletters: Web, educators, family programs, fellowships/internships, films, lectures, music programs, and teen programs. Select as many updates as you wish to receive. To edit your subscriber information, please go to our subscription management page.