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Upcoming Exhibitions

Léon-François-Antoine Fleury, 'The Tomb of Cecaelia Metella', c. 1830, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Frank Anderson Trapp

True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780-1870
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 2–May 3, 2020
Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris, June 14–September 13, 2020
Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, October 6, 2020–January 31, 2021

An integral part of art education in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, painting en plein air was a core practice for avant-garde artists in Europe. Intrepid artists such as Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, John Constable, Simon Denis, Jules Coignet, and André Giroux—highly skilled at quickly capturing effects of light and atmosphere—made sometimes arduous journeys to paint their landscapes in person at breathtaking sites, ranging from the Baltic coast and Swiss Alps to the streets of Paris and ruins of Rome. Drawing on new scholarship, this exhibition of some 100 oil sketches made outdoors across Europe during that time includes several recently discovered works and explores issues such as attribution, chronology, and technique.

The exhibition is accompanied by a comprehensive catalog with essays by leading experts in the field and will present new information about this key aspect of European art history.

The exhibition is curated by Mary Morton, curator and head of the department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art, Washington; Ger Luitjen, director, Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris; and Jane Munro, keeper of paintings, drawings and prints, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris; and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Caption: Léon-François-Antoine Fleury, The Tomb of Cecaelia Metella, c. 1830, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Frank Anderson Trapp, 2004.166.16

 

Raphael, The Prophets Hosea and Jonah, c. 1510, pen and brown ink with brown wash over charcoal and blind stylus, heightened with white gouache and squared for transfer with blind stylus and red chalk, on laid paper, overall: 26.2 x 20 cm (10 5/16 x 7 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Armand Hammer Collection

Raphael and His Circle
National Gallery of Art, Washington, February 16–June 14, 2020

Raphael (1483–1520) was one of the greatest artistic figures working in the Western classical tradition. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of his death, the Gallery presents 25 prints and drawings in an intimate installation. The works will illustrate how the combination of artistic traditions, wide range, and immediate influence of Raphael’s art shaped the standard of aesthetic excellence for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. The exhibition features four drawings by Raphael: the sheet from which the design of his painting Saint George and the Dragon (c. 1506, National Gallery of Art) was transferred; the cartoon for the so-called Belle Jardinière (La Vierge à l'Enfant avec le petit saint Jean-Baptiste, 1507 or 1508, Louvre Museum, Paris); a detailed representation of the prophets Hosea and Jonah; and a well-known study for part of the frescoes in the church of Santa Maria della Pace in Rome. Nine drawings by his closest collaborators and followers—Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, and Perino del Vaga—are also on view. The exhibition includes 10 engravings, as well as a chiaroscuro woodcut, by the earliest interpreters of Raphael’s designs: Marcantonio Raimondi and his followers Agostino Veneziano and Marco Dente da Ravenna as well as Ugo da Carpi. The Gallery’s five paintings by Raphael—the largest and most important group outside a few European collections—represent the central decade of his activity and will be on view on the main floor of the West Building to complement this exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Raphael, The Prophets Hosea and Jonah, c. 1510, pen and brown ink with brown wash over charcoal and blind stylus, heightened with white gouache and squared for transfer with blind stylus and red chalk, on laid paper, overall: 26.2 x 20 cm (10 5/16 x 7 7/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Armand Hammer Collection

 

Edgar Degas, 'The Curtain', c. 1880, pastel over charcoal and monotype on laid paper mounted on board. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Degas at the Opéra
Musée d'Orsay, Paris, September 24, 2019–January 19, 2020
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 1–July 5, 2020

An exuberant display of fecund imagination and keen observation, Edgar Degas's renowned images of the Paris Opéra are among the most sophisticated and visually compelling works he ever created. Celebrating the 350th anniversary of the Opéra's founding, Degas at the Opéra will present approximately 100 of the artist's best-known and beloved works in a range of media, including paintings, pastels, drawings, prints, and sculpture. It will be accompanied by a fully illustrated exhibition catalog.

Degas (1834–1917) is celebrated as the painter of dancers, a subject that dominated his art for nearly four decades. Although there have been many exhibitions celebrating his love of the ballet, this will be the first to consider his enduring fascination with the opera. A music lover and regular visitor to performances, Degas explored both the public spaces of the Paris Opéra—auditorium, stage, and boxes—as well as more private ones, including dance studios and backstage. He was friends with many of the people he depicted in his paintings, from dancers, singers, and orchestra musicians to the dark-suited subscribers.

The Opéra also fueled some of Degas's most daring technical innovations, including his first monotype, The Ballet Master (c. 1876), and his wax statue Little Dancer Aged Fourteen (1881), which revolutionized sculpture.

The exhibition is curated by Degas expert Henri Loyrette with Kimberly A. Jones, curator of 19th-century French paintings, National Gallery of Art; Leïla Jarbouai, graphic arts curator, Musée d'Orsay; and Marine Kisiel, curator, Musée d'Orsay.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Musées d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie, Paris

BP America is proud to be a sponsor of this Washington, D.C. exhibition as part of its support for the arts in the United States.

Adrienne Arsht also kindly provided a leadership gift for this exhibition

Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art

Caption: Edgar Degas, The Curtain, c. 1880, pastel over charcoal and monotype on laid paper mounted on board, sheet: 29 x 33.3 cm (11 7/16 x 13 1/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

 

Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, 'Adoration of the Shepherds', 1645, oil on canvas, Genova, Fondazione Spinola, Chiesa di San Luca, Copyright Scala / Art Resource, NY

A Superb Baroque: Art in Genoa, 1600–1750
National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 3–August 16, 2020
Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome, October 15, 2020–January 24, 2021

By the 17th century, Genoa was the banking center of Europe with a functioning republican government and enormous wealth that enabled its artists and their patrons to create a singularly rich and beautiful expression of baroque style, with works of extraordinary material sumptuousness, visual splendor, and exuberant feeling. The first major presentation of the Genoese baroque in the United States, this landmark exhibition—accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog—presents some 140 paintings, sculptures, decorative arts, drawings, and prints ranging from 1600 through 1750.

Forming the core of the exhibition are works by the school’s well-known painters—Bernardo Strozzi, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, and Alessandro Magnasco—as well as key works by other Italians and foreigners drawn to the city’s flourishing environment—Peter Paul Rubens, Giulio Cesare Procaccini, Orazio Gentileschi, Anthony van Dyck, and Francesco Solimena. Some of the very finest works by such native painters as Valerio Castello, Domenico Piola, and Gregorio De Ferrari are also on view. Monumental decorative ensembles from churches and residences are represented by corresponding oil sketches and presentation models, several grand in scale themselves. Also included are full-size statues by masters—Pierre Puget, Filippo Parodi, and Anton Maria Maragliano—terracotta sketches, and exquisite bronze repetitions of monumental groups, as well as spectacular ceremonial silver from early in the period.

Among the drawings and prints featured are many by the same artists who executed the paintings and objects, with some connected to them. These works reveal the striking characteristics of Genoese draftsmanship: complex techniques, pictorial elaboration, and autonomous function. In fantasy and fluency, the etchings—particularly those of Castiglione and Bartolomeo Biscaino—surpass those of any other Italian school.

The exhibition is curated by Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art; Piero Boccardo, Superintendent of the City Collections of Genoa; and Franco Boggero, director, historic and artistic heritage section, Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio, Genoa.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome

Caption:
Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, The Adoration of the Shepherds, 1645, oil on canvas, overall: 398 x 218 cm (156 11/16 x 85 13/16 in.), Genoa, Fondazione Spinola, Chiesa di San Luca © Scala / Art Resource, NY

 

Philip Guston, 'Painting, Smoking, Eating', 1973, oil on canvas, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Copyright The Estate of Philip Guston

Philip Guston Now
National Gallery of Art, Washington, June 7– September 13, 2020
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, October 18, 2020 – January 18, 2021
Tate Modern, London, February 17– June 13, 2021
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, July 17– October 17, 2021

One of America's greatest modern painters, Philip Guston (1913–1980) uniquely bridged the personal and the political, the abstract and the figurative, and the humorous and the tragic in paintings of lively touch and memorable impact. A major retrospective of Guston, the first in more than 15 years, will present a truly balanced view of the artist's 50-year career. A selection of approximately 125 paintings and 70 drawings from some 40 public and private collections will feature well-known works as well as others that have rarely been seen. Highlights include paintings from the 1930s that have never been on public view; the largest reunion of paintings from his groundbreaking Marlborough Gallery show in 1970; a thorough representation of satirical drawings of Richard Nixon and his associates; a dazzling array of small panel paintings made in 1968–1972 as Guston was developing his new vocabulary of hoods, books, bricks, and shoes; and a powerful selection of large, often apocalyptic paintings of the later 1970s that form the artist's last major artistic statement.

A fully illustrated monograph will include essays by the exhibition's co-curators and a richly illustrated chronology of his life and work, along with reflections by contemporary artists on their engagement with Guston and the impact of his work and legacy.

The exhibition is curated by Harry Cooper, senior curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art, Washington; Alison de Lima Greene, Isabel Brown Wilson Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Mark Godfrey, senior curator, international art, Tate Modern, London; and Kate Nesin, adjunct curator, contemporary art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Tate Modern, London; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Caption: Philip Guston, Painting, Smoking, Eating, 1973, oil on canvas, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, © The Estate of Philip Guston

 

Leonardo da Vinci, 'Ginevra de' Benci', c. 1474/1478, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

The Princely Collections, Liechtenstein: Five Centuries of European Painting and Sculpture
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, June 5 – September 7, 2020
Seattle Museum of Art, October 15, 2020 – January 10, 2021
Kimbell Museum of Art, Fort Worth, February 14 – May 16, 2021
National Gallery of Art, Washington, June 20 – September 6, 2021

Established in the mid-16th century and built over successive generations, the Princely Collections, Liechtenstein is one of the most storied private art collections in Europe. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the princely family made the decision to sell a number of their most important paintings and sculptures, which soon found homes in museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the National Gallery of Canada. Highlights of the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, that were once part of the Princely Collections include Leonardo da Vinci's Ginevra de' Benci (c. 1474/1478), Sir Peter Paul Rubens's Agrippina and Germanicus (c. 1614), and Orazio Gentileschi's The Lute Player (c. 1612/1620).

The Princely Collections, Liechtenstein: Five Centuries of European Painting and Sculpture presents nearly 100 works from the princely family's historic and current collections. The exhibition marks the first time that these works have been reunited and features examples by some 60 artists such as Antico, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Sandro Botticelli, Canaletto, Jean Siméon Chardin, Sir Anthony van Dyck, Fra Filipo and Filippino Lippi, Rembrandt van Rijn, Hyacinthe Rigaud, and Rubens. The exhibition also provides a rare look at some of the nearly 1,000 works acquired by the reigning Prince Hans-Adam II over the past three decades.

The exhibition is curated by Johann Kräftner, director of the Princely Collections; with Alexandra Libby, assistant curator of Northern Baroque paintings at the National Gallery of Art, Washington; and Anabelle Kienle Poňka, acting senior curator of European and American art at the National Gallery of Canada. The organizing curator for the American Federation of Arts is Suzanne Ramljak.

Organized by the Princely Collections, Liechtenstein, the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the American Federation of Arts.

Caption: Leonardo da Vinci, Ginevra de' Benci, c. 1474/1478, oil on panel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

 

Current Exhibitions

Alonso Berruguete, 'Study of Levi', c. 1526-1532, pen and brown ink, Art Institute of Chicago, The Leonora Hall Gurley Memorial Collection

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 13, 2019-February 17, 2020
Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, March 29-July 26, 2020

Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain will be the first major exhibition held outside Spain to celebrate the expressive art of the most important sculptor active on the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 16th century, Alonso Berruguete. The exhibition will present an impressive range of more than 40 works from across his career, including examples of his earliest paintings from his time in Italy, where he trained. His abilities as draftsman will also be celebrated with the largest group of his drawings ever to be assembled. The primary focus will be on his painted sculptures in wood, which generally decorated large altarpieces, or retablos. The Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid, Spain, will be lending a substantial group of some of his very best figures. A section of one of his altarpieces will be loosely reconstructed in the exhibition to convey an idea of how his sculptures were originally seen.

The exhibition is curated by C. D. Dickerson III, curator and head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Mark McDonald, curator of drawings and prints, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Curator for the Meadows Museum venue is Wendy Sepponen, Mellon Curatorial Fellow, Meadows Museum, SMU.

A fully illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition will be the first general book on Berruguete published in English and will feature essays by Dickerson as well as Manuel Arias Martínez, deputy director, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, and Mark McDonald, curator of Italian, Spanish, Mexican, and early French prints and illustrated books, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas, in collaboration with the Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Fund. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Caption: Alonso Berruguete, The Sacrifice of Isaac, 1526/1532, painted wood with gilding, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid. © Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid (Spain) Photo by Javier Muñoz and Paz Pastor

 

Edgar Degas, 'Young Woman Dressing Herself', 1885, pastel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the W. Averell Harriman Foundation in memory of Marie N. Harriman

The Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 29, 2019–January 26, 2020

Featuring approximately 70 examples drawn entirely from the Gallery's permanent collection, this exhibition traces the history of pastel from the Renaissance to the 21st century and examines the many variations in technique and artistic practice throughout the centuries. The Gallery's collection of pastels is unusually rich, with nearly every major period in the medium's development represented, often in depth. The exhibition explores the dual role of pastels as both paintings and drawings, the medium's appeal to women artists, and the ways in which later pastel artists turned away from the conventions and traditions established by their predecessors. With artists ranging from Federico Barocci to Roy Lichtenstein and beyond, The Touch of Color includes a colorful and varied group of stunning drawings, many of which have not been shown before.

The exhibition is curated by Stacey Sell, associate curator, department of old master drawings, National Gallery of Art, and Kimberly Schenck, head of paper conservation, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Made possible by a generous grant from the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust

Caption: Edgar Degas, Young Woman Dressing Herself, 1885, pastel, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the W. Averell Harriman Foundation in memory of Marie N. Harriman

 

Andrea del Verrocchio, 'Putto Poised on a Globe', c. 1480, unbaked clay, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence
Palazzo Strozzi and Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence, February 21-July 7, 2019
National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 15, 2019-January 12, 2020

Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence is the first ever monographic exhibition in the United States on Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435–1488), the groundbreaking artist, painter, sculptor, and teacher whose pupils included Leonardo da Vinci, Pietro Perugino, and likely Botticelli as well. The exhibition will examine the wealth and breadth of his extraordinary artistry by bringing together some 50 of his innovative masterpieces in painting, sculpture, drawing, and precious metal. Groundbreaking technical research explores Verrocchio's materials and techniques, offers revelations about his artistic choices, and proposes several new carefully argued attributions, in different media including sculptures and drawings. The National Gallery of Art is the sole American venue for the exhibition. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the landmark exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Andrew Butterfield, an internationally recognized historian whose monograph The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio (Yale University Press 1997) won the prestigious Mitchell prize. Collaborators include Gretchen A. Hirschauer, associate curator of Italian and Spanish painting, and Alison Luchs, curator of early European sculpture—both from the National Gallery of Art, Washington; and Lorenza Melli, curator of the Corpus of Italian Drawings 1300–1500/Rome-Munich-Florence, based at the Kunsthistorisches Institut/Max-Planck Institut, Florence. The exhibition was conceived by the late Eleonora Luciano (1963–2017), associate curator of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art, and is dedicated to her memory.

Technical research for the exhibition was realized by Gallery conservators Dylan Smith, Robert H. Smith Research Conservator in the department of object conservation, and Elizabeth Walmsley, senior painting conservator, and Gallery scientist John K. Delaney, senior imaging scientist in the scientific research department.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art in collaboration with the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, and the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence. Bank of America is a proud sponsor of the exhibition. Generous support has been kindly provided by the Buffy and William Cafritz Family Fund.

Caption: Andrea del Verrocchio, Putto Poised on a Globe, c. 1480, unbaked clay, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

 

William Edward Kilburn, 'Queen Victoria with her oldest children', January 19, 1852, daguerreotype with applied color, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund

The Eye of the Sun:
Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art, Washington, September 8–December 1, 2019

On the 180th anniversary of photography's introduction to the world in 1839, an exhibition of some 170 photographs offers an in-depth look at the development of the medium throughout its first 50 years. The Eye of the Sun draws from the Gallery's rich holdings of 19th-century photographs and features many works which have not been on view previously, including several photographs recently acquired from Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro.

The exhibition is organized chronologically and thematically, beginning with the earliest photographs in the collection by one of photography's inventors, William Henry Fox Talbot, and several examples of daguerreotypes, and ending with photographs made in 1889 by the Kodak, the first snapshot camera. Sections focus on themes of portraiture and self-presentation; landscape; the built environment; travel abroad and on the frontier; war; and photography and art. Among the photographers featured are Hill and Adamson, Mary Dillwyn, Roger Fenton, Francis Frith, Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, Gustave Le Gray, Charles Marville, Charles Nègre, Edouard Baldus, Andrew Russell, Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, and John Moran.

The exhibition is curated by Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, with Kara Fiedorek Felt, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, both National Gallery of Art, Washington.

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Trellis Fund.

Caption: William Edward Kilburn, Queen Victoria and Children, January 19, 1852, daguerreotype with applied color, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons' Permanent Fund, 2018.145.13

 

Loewy et Puiseux, 'Photographie Lunaire Rayonnement de Tycho - Phase Croissante', 1899, photogravure, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon and Patrons' Permanent Fund

By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs
National Gallery of Art, Washington, July 14, 2019-January 5, 2020

The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. An exhibition of some 50 works will include a selection of photographs from the unmanned Ranger, Surveyor, and Lunar Orbiter missions that led up to Apollo 11. The landmark event will be represented by glass stereographs, taken on the moon by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, showing close-up views of three-inch-square areas of the lunar surface, as well as iconic NASA and press photographs of the astronauts that were disseminated widely in the wake of the mission's success. Additionally, a select survey of lunar photographs from the 19th and early 20th centuries features works ranging from Warren de la Rue's late 1850s glass stereograph of the full moon to a suite of Charles Le Morvan's rich, velvety photogravures from Carte photographique et systematique de la lune, published in 1914, which attempted to systematically map the entire visible lunar surface. These photographs, from the 19th century to the "space-age" 1960s, merged art and science and transformed the way that we envision and comprehend the cosmos.

The exhibition is curated by Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, National Gallery of Art.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: Loewy et Puiseux, Photographie Lunaire Rayonnement de Tycho - Phase Croissante, 1899, photogravure, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon and Patrons' Permanent Fund

 

Special Installations

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
National Gallery of Art, Washington, October 7, 2012–ongoing

One of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands―acquired over the course of four decades by George M. and Linda H. Kaufman―was promised to the National Gallery of Art in October 2010. This permanent installation on the Ground Floor of the West Building highlights nearly 100 examples of the Kaufmans' early American furniture and decorative arts, presented with a selection of porcelains as well as watercolors by Pierre Joseph Redouté also from the Kaufman Collection. National Gallery paintings by such celebrated American artists as Gilbert Stuart are integrated into the display. The Kaufman gift dramatically transforms the Gallery's collection, augmenting its fine holdings of European decorative arts with equally important American works of art, and it is the first major display of early American decorative arts on continual public view in the nation's capital.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Caption: John and/or Hugh Finlay, Grecian couch, 1810-1840, walnut, cherry; white pine, poplar, cherry, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Promised Gift of George M. and Linda H. Kaufman

 

Touring Exhibitions

Unknown Artist, 'Deer Bearing Symbols of the Kasuga Deities', Nanboku-chō period, 14th century, bronze, Hosomi Museum

The Life of Animals in Japanese Art
National Gallery of Art, Washington, June 2–August 18, 2019

Artworks representing animals—real or imaginary, religious or secular—span the full breadth and splendor of Japanese artistic production. As the first exhibition devoted to the subject, The Life of Animals in Japanese Art covers 16 centuries (from the sixth century to the present day) and a wide variety of media—sculpture, painting, lacquerwork, ceramics, metalwork, textile, and the woodblock print. A selection of some 315 works, drawn from Japanese and American public and private collections, includes seven that are designated as Important Cultural Property by the Japanese government. The artists represented range from Sesson Shūkei, Itō Jakuchū, Soga Shōhaku, Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, to Okamoto Tarō, Kusama Yayoi, Issey Miyake, Nara Yoshitomo, and Murakami Takashi.

Covering 18,000 square feet in the East Building Concourse, the exhibition is organized into thematic sections that explore the various roles animals have played in the art of Japan. A fully illustrated catalog is being published in association with Princeton University Press.

The exhibition is curated by Robert T. Singer, curator and department head, Japanese art, LACMA, and Masatomo Kawai, director, Chiba City Museum of Art, in consultation with a team of esteemed of Japanese art historians.

Coorganized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the Japan Foundation, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with special cooperation from the Tokyo National Museum. LACMA is presenting an abbreviated version of the exhibition, titled Every Living Thing: Animals in Japanese Art from September 22 through December 8, 2019.

Made possible through the generous support of the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation also kindly provided a leadership gift for this exhibition. Additional funding is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art and the Annenberg Fund for the International Exchange of Art. Additional support is provided by All Nippon Airways (ANA). The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. The exhibition is part of Japan 2019, an initiative to promote Japanese culture in the United States.

Caption: Unknown Artist, Deer Bearing Symbols of the Kasuga Deities, Nanboku-chō period, 14th century, bronze, Hosomi Museum

 

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950
National Gallery of Art, Washington, November 4, 2018–February 18, 2019
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, March 23–June 9, 2019
Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, August 31–December 29, 2019
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, February 1–April 26, 2020

During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912-2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decades of Parks’s 60-year career are the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 120 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Bank of America is proud to be the national sponsor of Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950.

Generous support has also been kindly provided by the Trellis Fund.

The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art also contributed support

Caption: Gordon Parks, Washington, D.C. Government charwoman (American Gothic), 1942, gelatin silver print, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation

 

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 4–May 28, 2018
Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, June 30–September 23, 2018
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, November 20, 2018–February 10, 2019
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 3–May 27, 2019
Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris, June 17–September 22, 2019
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, October 19, 2019–February 2, 2020

For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 125 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann's artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann's powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann's art; her family photographs; contemporary representations of the black body; the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory; and Mann's debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington and Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts

The exhibition is supported by a generous grant from the Trellis Fund. Additional support is provided by Sally Engelhard Pingree and The Charles Engelhard Foundation.

Caption: Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled, (Scarred Tree), 1998, gelatin silver print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. © 2016 Sally Mann

 

General Information

The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are at all times free to the public. They are located on the National Mall between 3rd and 9th Streets at Constitution Avenue NW, and are open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Gallery is closed on December 25 and January 1. For information call (202) 737-4215 or visit the Gallery's Web site at www.nga.gov. Follow the Gallery on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalGalleryofArt, Twitter at www.twitter.com/ngadc, and Instagram at http://instagram.com/ngadc.

Visitors will be asked to present all carried items for inspection upon entering. Checkrooms are free of charge and located at each entrance. Luggage and other oversized bags must be presented at the 4th Street entrances to the East or West Building to permit x-ray screening and must be deposited in the checkrooms at those entrances. For the safety of visitors and the works of art, nothing may be carried into the Gallery on a visitor's back. Any bag or other items that cannot be carried reasonably and safely in some other manner must be left in the checkrooms. Items larger than 17 by 26 inches cannot be accepted by the Gallery or its checkrooms.
 
For additional press information please call or send inquiries to:
Department of Communications
National Gallery of Art
2000B South Club Drive
Landover, MD 20785
phone: (202) 842-6353
e-mail: [email protected]
 
Anabeth Guthrie
Chief of Communications
(202) 842-6804
[email protected]

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