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Release Date: June 28, 2011

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  • Sep 16, 2019 11:14 AMA Century of Lunar Photographs
    Washington, DC—The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. From the moment photography was introduced in 1839, photographers dreamt about harnessing the potential of photography together with the telescope. While astronomers had earlier mapped many of the moon's visible features through the telescope, the first photographs revealing the lunar landscape were successfully achieved by the 1850s. Throughout the latter half of the 19th century and into the 20th, numerous photographers created uncannily beautiful lunar pictures that captured the public imagination. "By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs" presents some 50 works, from the 19th century to the "space-age" 1960s, that merged art with science and transformed the way that we envision and comprehend the cosmos. The exhibition is on view at the National Gallery of Art from July 14, 2019 through January 5, 2020.

  • Sep 16, 2019 11:12 AMVerrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence
    Washington, DC—The National Gallery of Art is pleased to present "Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence," the first-ever monographic exhibition on Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435–1488), the innovative artist, painter, sculptor, and teacher whose pupils included Leonardo da Vinci, Pietro Perugino, and likely Sandro Botticelli as well. The exhibition examines the wealth and breadth of Verrocchio's extraordinary artistry by bringing together some 50 of his masterpieces in painting, sculpture, and drawing that allow viewers to appreciate how his work in each art form stimulated creativity in the others.

  • Sep 16, 2019 10:26 AMAlonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain
    Washington, DC—Alonso Berruguete (c. 1488–1561) revolutionized the arts of Renaissance Spain with a dramatic style of sculpture that reflected the decade or more he spent in Italy while young. Although unfamiliar to most Americans, and rarely featured in traditional accounts of Renaissance art, Berruguete has been revered as an icon in Spain for centuries. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas, in collaboration with the Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid, Spain, "Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain" is the first exhibition devoted to the artist held outside Spain. About 45 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper drawn mostly from international collections will be on view in the Gallery's West Building from October 13, 2019, through February 17, 2020.

  • Sep 16, 2019 9:45 AMThe American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists
    Washington, DC—In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819–1900), the most influential art critic of the Victorian era, the National Gallery of Art will present more than 80 paintings, watercolors, drawings, and photographs created by American artists who were profoundly influenced by the renowned critic. Ruskin's call for a revolutionary change in the practice of art found a sympathetic audience in America among a group of like-minded artists, architects, scientists, critics, and collectors who organized the Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art. New research reveals that the members of the Association sought reform not only in the practice of art, but also in the broader political arena during the Civil War era. "The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists", including several recently discovered works never exhibited publicly, will be on view at the National Gallery of Art from April 14 through July 21, 2019.

  • Sep 16, 2019 9:41 AMOliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings
    Washington, DC—A distinguished painter, printmaker, and sculptor, Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex and original body of work that remains rooted in the human figure while drawing on all the resources of modernist abstraction and expression. Jackson's paintings, often large in scale, defy categorization. Figurative elements captivate the eye, while the dynamic compositions, vibrant colors, and vigorously worked surfaces in a variety of materials capture the viewer's attention. On view in the East Building of the National Gallery of Art from April 14 through September 15, 2019, "Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings" presents some 20 paintings created over the past 15 years, many of which are being shown publicly for the first time.

  • Sep 11, 2019 12:14 PMThe Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art
    Washington, DC—Through the centuries, artists have adopted a variety of approaches to pastel, experimenting with it to achieve exciting and unexpected effects. Featuring approximately 70 exquisite examples drawn entirely from the permanent collection, "The Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art" traces the history of pastel from the Renaissance to the 21st century. "The Touch of Color" includes many works that have not been exhibited before and will be on view at the National Gallery of Art from September 29, 2019, through January 26, 2020.

  • Jul 24, 2019 4:46 PMThe Life of Animals in Japanese Art
    Washington, DC—Artworks representing animals—real or imaginary, religious or secular—span the full breadth and splendor of Japanese artistic production.

  • Jul 8, 2019 4:47 PMThe Eye of the Sun
    Washington, DC—When photography was introduced to the world in 1839, society and culture were poised to undergo profound change. 180 years after the French invention of the daguerreotype and the rival British photogenic drawing, the medium has undoubtedly created new ways of seeing, experiencing, and understanding the world. "The Eye of the Sun: Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art" explores the range of subjects that photographers embraced during the medium's first 50 years through a selection of some 140 photographs from the Gallery's rich holdings of 19th-century photographs, one of the finest collections in America. On view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art from September 8 through December 1, 2019, the exhibition presents more than 80 recent acquisitions, many not previously on view, including a large group acquired from the collection of Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro.

  • Jun 26, 2019 1:36 PMPhilip Guston Now
    Washington, DC—One of America's greatest modern painters, Philip Guston (1913–1980) uniquely bridged the personal and the political, the abstract and the figurative, and the humorous and the tragic in paintings of lively touch and memorable impact. A major retrospective of the artist, "Philip Guston Now", the first in more than 15 years, will present a balanced view of the artist's 50-year career. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Tate Modern, London, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the exhibition will debut in the Gallery's East Building from June 7 through September 13, 2020.

  • Apr 23, 2019 8:24 AMDawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project
    Washington, DC—For more than 40 years photographer Dawoud Bey (b. 1953) has portrayed American youth and those from marginalized communities with an unusual degree of sensitivity and complexity. Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project celebrates the National Gallery of Art's recent acquisition of four large-scale photographs and one video from Bey's most important series, "The Birmingham Project," a deeply felt and conceptually rich monument to the victims of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963. Coinciding with the 55th anniversary of this tragedy, the exhibition focuses on Bey's representation of the past through the lens of the present, pushing the boundaries of portraiture and engaging ongoing national issues of racism, violence against African Americans, and terrorism in churches. Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project will be on view at the National Gallery of Art from September 12, 2018, through March 17, 2019.

  • Apr 9, 2019 2:21 PMColor, Line, Light: French Drawings, Watercolors, and Pastels from Delacroix to Signac
    Washington, DC—For the art of drawing, 19th-century France was a remarkably creative period of richness, diversity, experimentation, and inventiveness. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from January 27 through May 26, 2013, Color, Line, Light: French Drawings, Watercolors, and Pastels from Delacroix to Signac presents 100 outstanding works that showcase the broad development of modern draftsmanship during this period. The works are from the collection of James T. Dyke, including sheets he and his wife, Helen L. Porter, have given to the Gallery, as well as others acquired by the Gallery with funds they donated.

  • Apr 9, 2019 2:21 PMPre-Raphaelites: Victorian Art and Design, 1848–1900
    Washington, DC—Combining rebellion, scientific precision, beauty, and imagination, the Pre-Raphaelites created art that shocked 19th-century Britain. On view from February 17 through May 19, 2013, at the National Gallery of Art, Washington—the sole U.S. venue—"Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Art and Design, 1848–1900" is the first major survey of the art of the Pre-Raphaelites to be shown in the United States. The exhibition features some 130 paintings, sculptures, photography, works on paper, and decorative art objects that reflect the ideals of Britain's first modern art movement.

  • Apr 9, 2019 2:20 PMAlbrecht Dürer: Master Drawings, Watercolors, and Prints from the Albertina
    Washington, DC—Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) is widely considered the greatest German artist. From March 24 through June 9, 2013, the Albertina Museum in Vienna, Austria, will lend to the National Gallery of Art 118 works on paper by Dürer for a magnificent exhibition that will be on view only in Washington. Albrecht Dürer: Master Drawings, Watercolors, and Prints from the Albertina features nearly all of Dürer's finest watercolors and drawings from the collection of the Albertina, Vienna, as well as 27 of the museum's related engravings and woodcuts. The exhibition also includes 19 drawings and prints from the Gallery's own collection.

  • Apr 8, 2019 4:36 PMDrawing in Tintoretto's Venice
    Washington, DC—The first exhibition in 40 years to focus specifically on Venetian Renaissance artist Jacopo Tintoretto's (1518/1519–1594) work as a draftsman, Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice offers new ideas about his artistic evolution, working procedure, and workshop practice. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of Tintoretto's birth, the exhibition presents approximately 80 of the finest examples from some two dozen public and private collections.

  • Apr 8, 2019 4:35 PMVenetian Prints in the Time of Tintoretto
    Washington, DC—The first exhibition in 40 years to focus specifically on Venetian Renaissance artist Jacopo Tintoretto's (1518/1519–1594) work as a draftsman, Drawing in Tintoretto's Venice offers new ideas about his artistic evolution, working procedure, and workshop practice. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of Tintoretto's birth, the exhibition presents approximately 80 of the finest examples from some two dozen public and private collections.

  • Mar 25, 2019 12:47 PMTintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice
    Washington, DC—Their classification may have varied—from folk and primitive to naïve and visionary—but intermittently throughout the history of modern art, gates have opened, boundaries have dissolved, and those creating art on the periphery have entered the art world.

  • Feb 13, 2019 1:04 PMSense of Humor
    Washington, DC—Prints and drawings have consistently served as popular media for humor in art. Prints, which can be widely replicated and distributed, are ideal for institutional mockery and social criticism, while drawings, unmediated and private, allow for free rein of the imagination. Sense of Humor will celebrate the rich yet often overlooked tradition of humor in works on paper, ranging from the 15th to 20th century. On view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from July 15, 2018, through January 6, 2019, the exhibition is organized broadly chronologically, tracing the variety of forms that comical prints and drawings have taken over time, from Renaissance caricature to British satire in the 18th century and counterculture comics of the late 1960s. Drawn entirely from the Gallery's collection, works are by artists including Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Jacques Callot, William Hogarth, Francisco de Goya, Honoré Daumier, Art Spiegelman, Hans Haacke, George Herriman, Roger Brown, and the Guerrilla Girls. Many works will be shown for the first time.

  • Jan 28, 2019 2:17 PMGordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950
    Washington, DC—Within just a decade, Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught portrait photographer and photojournalist in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional working in New York for Ebony and Glamour, before becoming the first African American photographer at Life magazine in 1949. For the first time this lesser-known yet incredibly formative period of Parks's long and illustrious career is the subject of an exhibition, Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950. On view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from November 4, 2018, through February 18, 2019, the traveling exhibition provides a detailed look at Parks's early evolution through some 150 photographs, as well as rare magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, and books. It also demonstrates how Parks influenced and was inspired by a network of creative and intellectual figures—including Charles White, Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison. A fully illustrated catalog, produced and published by the Gordon Parks Foundation and Steidl in association with the Gallery, features extensive new research and many previously unpublished images.

  • Jan 28, 2019 9:16 AMThe Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy
    Washington, DC—Chiaroscuro woodcuts are among the rarest and most beautiful prints that flourished throughout Renaissance Italy. This exhibition, with its accompanying catalog, addresses all aspects of this remarkable art form, from attribution and chronology to materials and processes, intention and reception. The first comprehensive study devoted to the Italian chiaroscuro woodcut, the exhibition is based on new art-historical and technical research carried out over the last decade. Presenting some 100 of the finest impressions from American and British collections, "The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy" will be on view at the National Gallery of Art from October 14, 2018, through January 20, 2019.

  • Dec 4, 2018 5:12 PMJackson Pollock's "Mural"
    Washington, DC—Stretching nearly 20 feet wide by 8 feet tall, "Mural" (1943) is the largest work by Jackson Pollock (1912-1956). Beyond its monumental proportions and the many myths that surround its creation, the painting stands as one of the artist's greatest achievements.

  • Dec 4, 2018 5:11 PMFragonard: The Fantasy Figures
    Washington, DC—Combining art, fashion, science, and conservation, the revelatory exhibition 'Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures' brings together—for the first time—a newly discovered drawing by Jean Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806) and some 14 of his paintings that have been identified with it including the Gallery's own 'Young Girl Reading' (c. 1769).

  • Dec 4, 2018 9:55 AMWater, Wind, and Waves: Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age
    Washington, DC—For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (b. 1951) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that explore the overarching themes of existence: memory, desire, death, the bonds of family, and nature's magisterial indifference to human endeavor. What unites this broad body of work—figure studies, landscapes, and architectural views—is that it is all bred of a place, the American South. Using her deep love of her homeland and her knowledge of its historically fraught heritage, Mann asks powerful, provocative questions—about history, identity, race, and religion—that reverberate across geographic and national boundaries.

  • Oct 16, 2018 4:32 PMRachel Whiteread
    Washington, DC—For the past 30 years, acclaimed British artist Rachel Whiteread (b. 1963) has created a body of work that is wide-ranging in scale and medium, yet consistent in its process of casting the objects and spaces of everyday life. Whiteread deploys replication, reorientation, and repetition to trace a social past while bringing it into the present. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from September 16, 2018, through January 13, 2019, "Rachel Whiteread" is the first major survey of the artist's work.

  • Sep 12, 2018 10:06 AMCorot: Women
    Washington, DC—Dressed in rustic Italian costume or nude on a grassy plain, rendered with a sophisticated use of color and a deft, delicate touch, Corot's women convey a mysterious sense of their inner lives. "Corot: Women" features 44 paintings created between the 1840s and the early 1870s: nudes, individual figures in costumes, and an allegorical series of the model in the studio. The National Gallery of Art is the only venue for "Corot: Women", on view from September 9 through December 31, 2018.

  • Aug 8, 2018 1:48 PMCézanne Portraits
    Washington, DC—One of the most innovative Italian books of the early baroque period, the Descrizione del Sacro Monte della Vernia, published in 1612, illustrates the experiences of Saint Francis and the buildings of the Franciscan community at La Verna. Drawing from the Gallery's rich holdings of works with Franciscan imagery, Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna contextualizes this publication alongside some 30 traditional representations from the late 15th through the mid-18th century. Heavenly Earth will be on view on the ground floor of the West Building from February 25 through July 8, 2018.

  • Aug 8, 2018 9:40 AMSharing Images: Renaissance Prints into Maiolica and Bronze
    Washington, DC—The first exhibition of its kind in the United States, "Sharing Images: Renaissance Prints into Maiolica and Bronze", brings together some 90 objects to highlight the impact of Renaissance prints on maiolica and bronze plaquettes. Accompanied by a publication that provides a comprehensive introduction to different aspects of the phenomenon—from the role of 15th-century prints and the rediscovery of classical art to the importance of illustrated books and the artistic exchanges between Italy and northern Europe—"Sharing Images" will be on view on the ground floor of the West Building from April 1 through August 5, 2018.

  • Aug 2, 2018 1:09 PMSmall Wonders: Dutch Still Lifes by Adriaen Coorte

  • Aug 2, 2018 12:53 PMRenaissance Bronzes from the Robert H. Smith Collection on View at the National Gallery of Art, September 29, 2002, Through February 17, 2003
    Washington, DC—An installation of more than 50 small European bronze sculptures mostly dating from the mid-16th to the mid-17th century and lent by Robert H. Smith, president, National Gallery of Art, will be on view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art from September 29, 2002, through February 17, 2003. One of the most important collections of bronze sculpture in private hands, the Robert H. Smith Collection comprises exceptionally fine examples of works by major contemporaries and successors of Michelangelo. These bronzes have been integrated with works from the National Gallery as part of the opening of a new suite of ground floor sculpture galleries.

  • Aug 2, 2018 12:53 PMBronze and Boxwood: Renaissance Masterpieces from the Robert H. Smith Collection
    Washington, DC – An outstanding collection of Renaissance statuettes will go on view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in Bronze and Boxwood: Renaissance Masterpieces from the Robert H. Smith Collection, January 27 through May 4, 2008 in the West Building, main floor galleries 74 and 75. In addition to 46 beautiful bronze sculptures, this exhibition will include eight exceptional objects carved out of boxwood and ivory, which are similar in size to the bronzes and may be closely related to them.

  • Aug 2, 2018 12:06 PMTwentieth-Century American Art: The Ebsworth Collection

  • Jul 13, 2018 9:54 AMIn the Tower: Anne Truitt
    Washington, DC—The studio life of Anne Truitt (1921–2004) is explored in the focus exhibition In the Tower: Anne Truitt, on view in the East Building, Tower 3, from November 19, 2017, through April 1, 2018.

  • Jul 13, 2018 9:53 AMHeavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna
    Washington, DC—One of the most innovative Italian books of the early baroque period, the Descrizione del Sacro Monte della Vernia, published in 1612, illustrates the experiences of Saint Francis and the buildings of the Franciscan community at La Verna. Drawing from the Gallery's rich holdings of works with Franciscan imagery, Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna contextualizes this publication alongside some 30 traditional representations from the late 15th through the mid-18th century. Heavenly Earth will be on view on the ground floor of the West Building from February 25 through July 8, 2018.

  • May 30, 2018 12:22 PMParis in Transition
    Washington, DC—Paris in Transition: Photographs from the National Gallery of Art presents 61 of the Gallery’s photographs revealing the transformation of the French capital city and the art of photography from the mid-19th to early 20th century. The exhibition, organized from the perspective of a flâneur—an aimless wanderer, will be on view in the ground floor photographs galleries of the West Building from February 11 through May 6, 2007. It includes photographs by Eugène Atget, André Kertész, Brassaï, Alfred Stieglitz and others.

  • May 29, 2018 9:29 AMSally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
    Washington, DC—For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (b. 1951) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that explore the overarching themes of existence: memory, desire, death, the bonds of family, and nature's magisterial indifference to human endeavor. What unites this broad body of work—figure studies, landscapes, and architectural views—is that it is all bred of a place, the American South. Using her deep love of her homeland and her knowledge of its historically fraught heritage, Mann asks powerful, provocative questions—about history, identity, race, and religion—that reverberate across geographic and national boundaries.

  • May 14, 2018 9:49 AMOutliers and American Vanguard Art
    Washington, DC—Their classification may have varied—from folk and primitive to naïve and visionary—but intermittently throughout the history of modern art, gates have opened, boundaries have dissolved, and those creating art on the periphery have entered the art world.

  • May 14, 2018 9:48 AMMichel Sittow: Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe
    Washington, DC—Considered Estonia's greatest Renaissance artist, Michel Sittow (c. 1469–1525) was sought after by the renowned European courts of his day, including those of King Ferdinand of Aragón and Queen Isabella of Castile, Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, and Christian II of Denmark. In celebration of the centennial of the establishment of the Republic of Estonia, Michel Sittow: Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe provides an exceptional opportunity to examine the rare and masterful works attributed to Sittow.

  • Apr 12, 2018 10:10 AMCaptain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860
    Washington, DC—Innovative British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe (1822–1902) captured some of the earliest photographs of India and Burma (now Myanmar). In the first major traveling exhibition of his work, Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852–1860—on view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from September 21, 2014, through January 4, 2015—approximately 60 photographs taken between 1854 and 1860 document the dramatic landscapes and the architecture of celebrated religious and secular sites in India and Burma, several of which are now destroyed.

  • Apr 12, 2018 10:10 AMGustave Caillebotte: The Painter’s Eye

  • Apr 11, 2018 5:04 PMPleasure and Piety: The Art of Joachim Wtewael (1566–1638)
    Washington, DC—The brilliantly colored and highly sensual works by Utrecht master Joachim Wtewael will be showcased in the artist's first monographic exhibition, from June 28 through October 4, 2015, at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. Pleasure and Piety: The Art of Joachim Wtewael (1566–1638) includes nearly 50 of his finest paintings on canvas, copper, and panel, as well as selected drawings. Ranging from portraits and moralizing biblical scenes to witty mythological compositions, these works underscore the artist's reputation as a remarkable storyteller.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:55 PMThe Serial Impulse at Gemini G.E.L.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:52 PMCelebrating Photography at the National Gallery of Art: Recent Gifts

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:50 PMThree Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art
    Washington, DC— A new international traveling exhibition will explore major events and movements in American art through some 150 outstanding prints from the Colonial era to the present. On view in Washington from April 3 through July 24, 2016, "Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art" is the first major museum survey of American prints in more than 30 years. The exhibition will travel to the National Gallery in Prague from October 4, 2016 through January 5, 2017, followed by Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso from February 7 through April 30, 2017.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:48 PM"Intersections" Explores Connections Between Newly Joined Photography Collections from National Gallery of Art and Corcoran Gallery of Art
    Washington, DC—"Intersections: Photographs and Videos from the National Gallery of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art" explores the connections between the two newly joined photography collections. On view from May 29, 2016, through January 2, 2017, the exhibition is organized around themes found in the work of the two pioneers of each collection: Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904) and Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946). Inspired by these two seminal artists, Intersections brings together more than 100 highlights of the recently merged collections by a range of artists from the 1870s to today.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:47 PMHubert Robert, 1733-1808
    Washingtom, DC—Celebrated for the fundamental role he played in promoting the architectural capriccio, Hubert Robert combined famous monuments of antiquity and modernity in unexpected ways to create strikingly new and imaginative city scenes and landscapes. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from June 26 through October 2, 2016, "Hubert Robert, 1733–1808" is the first monographic exhibition in the United States on the artist as well as the first exhibition to survey his achievements as both a painter and a draftsman.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:45 PMRecent Acquisitions of Dutch and Flemish Drawings
    Washington, DC—Over the last decade, the National Gallery of Art has acquired an exquisite selection of mid-15th-to early 20th-century Dutch and Flemish drawings. Some 20 works—many on view for the first time—cover a range of genres and incorporate a variety of media. "Recent Acquisitions of Dutch and Flemish Drawings" will be on view in the West Building from July 3, 2016 through January 2, 2017. Highlights include a page from a 15th-century manuscript (c. 1442) with illustrations by Barthélemy van Eyck (active c. 1435–1470); a vibrant, full-color miniature of "The Adoration of the Magi" (mid-1520s) by Simon Bening (1483/1484– 1561); a unique large portrait drawing by Michael Sweerts (1618–1664); and two rare compositional studies by Gerrit van Honthorst (1590–1656).

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:44 PMIn the Tower: Barbara Kruger
    Washington, DC—The striking works of Barbara Kruger (American, b. 1945) will be featured in a focused exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, timed to celebrate the newly renovated East Building galleries. On view September 30, 2016 through January 22, 2017, 'In the Tower: Barbara Kruger' is the first exhibition in the Tower Gallery in three years, renewing the series devoted to the presentation of works by leading contemporary artists. The exhibition presents fourteen of Kruger's profile works — images of the figure in profile over which the artist has layered her attention-grabbing phrases and figures of speech — from the early 1980s to the present, varying in scale from magazine-size to monumental.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:43 PMDamien Hirst: The Last Supper
    Washington, DC—The Last Supper (1990), a series of 13 monumental prints by British artist Damien Hirst, was acquired by the National Gallery of Art from the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 2015. Hirst was among the most prominent of the Young British Artists—or YBAs, as they are known—who revitalized the British art scene in the 1990s. In The Last Supper, he wittily explores the role of faith, viewing it in relation to art, medicine, and religion. Never before shown in Washington in its entirety, the visually arresting Last Supper series will be installed in the West Building Concourse Gallery from August 13 through November 27, 2016.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:42 PMLos Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971,

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:41 PMPhotography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker
    Washington, DC—In celebration of a remarkable promised gift of 34 important contemporary photographs from the collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, a special exhibition will be presented in the reopened East Building galleries at the National Gallery of Art. On view September 30, 2016, through March 5, 2017, "Photography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker" presents seminal works by 18 artists, including Thomas Demand, Thomas Struth, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Jeff Wall, who in the last two decades have created pictures that expand our understanding of the nature of photography and greatly enhance the Gallery's holdings of contemporary photography.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:40 PMDrawings for Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt
    Washington, DC—With their vivid details and realistic nature, 17th-century Dutch landscapes, still lifes, and genre scenes seem to have been painted from life. In fact, most artists based their paintings on preliminary drawings. Drawings for Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt, on view in the West Building from October 4, 2016, through January 2, 2017, will shed light on the varied ways in which renowned artists of the Dutch golden age—including Rembrandt van Rijn, Aelbert Cuyp, Jacob van Ruisdael, and Pieter Jansz Saenredam—used drawings as part of the painting process.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:40 PMThe Urban Scene: 1920-1950
    Washington, DC—American artists of the early 20th century sought to interpret the beauty, power, and anxiety of the modern age in diverse ways. Through depictions of bustling city crowds and breathtaking metropolitan vistas, 25 black-and-white prints on view in 'The Urban Scene: 1920–1950' will explore the spectacle of urban modernity. Prints by recognized artists such as Louis Lozowick (1892–1973) and Reginald Marsh (1898–1954), as well as lesser-known artists including Mabel Dwight (1875–1955), Gerald Geerlings (1897–1998), Victoria Hutson Huntley (1900–1971), Martin Lewis (1881–1962), and Stow Wengenroth (1906–1978), are included in this exhibition. 'The Urban Scene' will be on view in the West Building from February 26 through August 6, 2017.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:38 PMEdvard Munch: Color in Context
    Washington, DC—In the second half of the 19th century, advances in physics, electromagnetic radiation theory, and the optical sciences provoked new thought about the physical as well as the spiritual world.

  • Apr 11, 2018 4:36 PMVermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry
    Washington, DC—More than 20 years after the legendary exhibition 'Johannes Vermeer', the National Gallery of Art, Washington, presents 'Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry'. On view in the West Building from October 22, 2017, through January 21, 2018, the exhibition examines the artistic exchanges among Dutch Golden Age painters from 1650 to 1675, when they reached the height of their technical ability and mastery at depicting domestic life.

  • Mar 7, 2018 2:39 PMTitian's Danaë

  • Feb 20, 2018 11:24 AMPosing for the Camera: Gifts from Robert B. Menschel
    Washington, DC—"Posing for the Camera: Gifts from Robert B. Menschel" explores posing in photography and examines how photographers have both drawn on artistic conventions and exploited the collaborative nature of the medium to create probing portraits of their subjects.

  • Feb 15, 2018 1:05 PMVermeer's "Woman in Blue Reading a Letter" from the Rijksmuseum
    Washington, DC—The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has lent one of its great treasures—'Johannes Vermeer's Woman in Blue Reading a Letter' (c. 1663)—to the National Gallery of Art in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the landmark 'Johannes Vermeer' exhibition, which opened here in November 1995 before traveling to the Royal Cabinet of Paintings Mauritshuis, The Hague, in March 1996.

  • Jan 31, 2018 12:20 AMIn the Tower: Mel Bochner

  • Jan 31, 2018 12:20 AMEast of the Mississippi
    Washington, DC—Before venturing west to capture America's frontier in paintings and photographs, 19th-century artists explored the eastern landscape, which served as a powerful source of mythmaking for a nation finding its identity in the nineteenth century. However, with the exception of images from the Civil War, photography of the East during the period has never before been the exclusive focus of an exhibition or catalog. As the first of its kind, "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography" will explore this fundamental chapter in America's photographic history through 175 photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereo cards, and albums. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, West Building from March 12 through July 16, 2017, the exhibition showcases photographers who documented the nation's transition over the course of the century, exploring the untouched wilderness, the devastation of the Civil War, and the dramatic transformations of industrialization.

  • Jan 31, 2018 12:20 AMEllsworth Kelly: Colored Paper Images

  • Jan 31, 2018 12:20 AMThe Baroque Genius of Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione

  • Jan 31, 2018 12:20 AMThe Serial Portrait: Photography and Identity in the Last One Hundred Years

  • Jan 17, 2018 12:04 PMBosch to Bloemaert
    Washington, DC—Rotterdam's historic Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen holds one of the finest collections of Netherlandish master drawings. In a special presentation of this collection at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, some 100 works explore the many functions of drawings, from preparatory studies for paintings and designs for prints to finished works of art.

  • Sep 28, 2017 7:50 PMIn the Tower: Kerry James Marshall
    Washington, DC—The National Gallery of Art announced today plans to host the city's first solo exhibition of the work of American artist Kerry James Marshall. On view from June 28 through December 7, 2013, "In the Tower: Kerry James Marshall" will present some 30 works, including the Gallery's own "Great America" (1994), as well as provide a context for understanding this particular painting and its powerful imagery within the broader arc of the artist's career.

  • Sep 28, 2017 2:22 PMPiero di Cosimo: The Poetry of Painting in Renaissance Florence

  • Sep 28, 2017 2:22 PMDegas's Little Dancer

  • Sep 7, 2017 10:22 AMCivic Pride: Group Portraits from Amsterdam

  • Sep 7, 2017 10:21 AMIn the Tower: Theaster Gates
    Washington, DC—The cross-disciplinary American artist Theaster Gates (b. 1973) presents a new body of work, 'The Minor Arts', as part of the Tower exhibition series at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. On view in the East Building, Tower 3, from March 5 through September 4, 2017, 'In the Tower: Theaster Gates' examines how discarded and ordinary objects acquire value through the stories we tell. It marks the artist's first solo exhibition in Washington and on the East Coast.

  • Aug 21, 2017 9:34 AMAmerica Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting

  • Jul 17, 2017 4:00 PMThe Woodner Collections: Master Drawings from Seven Centuries
    Washington, DC—Ian Woodner assembled an extraordinary collection of over 1,000 old master and modern drawings, making him one of the 20th century's most important collectors. More than 150 works from his collection now reside at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. While Ian Woodner gave some works himself in the 1980s, the majority have been donated by his daughters, Dian and Andrea. His daughters have also made other gifts and have pledged works from their personal collections. "The Woodner Collections: Master Drawings from Seven Centuries" brings together for the first time the best of Ian Woodner's collection with some of the works given and promised by Dian and Andrea Woodner. More than 100 major works of art will be on view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art from March 12 through July 16, 2017.

  • Jul 17, 2017 12:25 PMStuart Davis: In Full Swing
    Washington, DC—One of the most important American modernists, Stuart Davis blurred distinctions between text and image, high and low art, and abstraction and figuration, crafting a distinct style that continues to influence art being made today. On view at the National Gallery of Art, West Building, from November 20, 2016 through March 5, 2017, "Stuart Davis: In Full Swing" features some 100 of his most important, visually complex, jazz-inspired compositions, offering a new exploration of his working method.

  • Jul 17, 2017 12:23 PMDella Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence
    Washington, DC—More than 500 years after their creation, Della Robbia terracotta sculptures endure as some of the most innovative and expressive examples of art from the Italian Renaissance. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, West Building from February 5 through June 4, 2017, "Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence" is the first major American exhibition dedicated to works by three generations of the Della Robbia family and their competitors. The exhibition travels to the Gallery, the only other venue, after premiering at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) from August 9 to December 4, 2016.

  • Jul 17, 2017 12:21 PMFrédéric Bazille and the Birth of Impressionism

  • May 11, 2017 6:37 PMMasterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830
    Washington, DC—The National Gallery of Art presents "Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830." When this installation opens on October 7, 2012, on the Ground Floor of the West Building, it will be a landmark moment for the nation's capital, which until this time has had no major presentation of early American furniture and related decorative arts on permanent public view. The installation follows the promised gift in October 2010 of one of the largest and most refined collections of early American furniture in private hands, acquired with great connoisseurship over five decades by George M. (1932–2001) and Linda H. Kaufman (b. 1938).

  • Feb 6, 2017 11:12 AMRenaissance to Revolution: French Drawings from the National Gallery of Art, 1500–1800
    Washington, DC—Some 135 of the most significant and beautiful drawings made over a period of three centuries by the best French artists working at home and abroad and by foreign artists working in France will be on view in Renaissance to Revolution: French Drawings from the National Gallery of Art, 1500–1800 in the Gallery's West Building from October 1, 2009, through January 31, 2010. This is the first comprehensive exhibition and catalogue to focus on the Gallery's permanent collection of French old master drawings, which is remarkable for its breadth, depth, and individual masterpieces.

  • Feb 6, 2017 10:42 AMPrivate Treasures: Four Centuries of European Master Drawings
    Washington, DC—Private Treasures: Four Centuries of European Master Drawings offers a selection of works from one of America's most significant private collections of master drawings. The exhibition, on view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from May 6 through September 16, features 100 of the finest drawings from the collection, and represents 85 artists of the Italian, French, Dutch, Flemish, German, Swiss, British, and Swedish schools from the 16th to the 20th centuries.

  • Feb 6, 2017 10:19 AMClaude Lorrain—The Painter as Draftsman: Drawings from the British Museum
    Washington, DC—The art of one of France's greatest landscape draftsmen and painters, Claude Lorrain (1604/1605–1682), travels to the National Gallery of Art, when Claude Lorrain—The Painter as Draftsman: Drawings from the British Museum goes on view in the West Building, May 27 through August 12, 2007. The exhibition includes 80 drawings from the extensive and important holdings at the British Museum. In addition, a selection of paintings and etchings broadens the representation of Claude's achievement as an artist. Many of the works have never before been seen in the United States.

  • Sep 19, 2016 3:59 PMIn Celebration of Paul Mellon
    Washington, DC—Paul Mellon was one of America's greatest art collectors and remains one of the National Gallery of Art's leading benefactors. Timed to coincide with the Gallery's 75th anniversary, In Celebration of Paul Mellon features 88 of the finest pastels, watercolors, drawings, prints, and illustrated books selected from his donations.

  • May 18, 2016 9:49 AMLouise Bourgeois: No Exit
    Washington, DC—Evocative drawings, prints, and sculptures by the tenacious artist Louise Bourgeois will be presented in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art from November 15, 2015 through May 15, 2016. The 21 works in the exhibition, either drawn from the collection or promised to the Gallery, reveal Bourgeois's intensely personal approach to art-making and explore her grounding in surrealism and ties to existentialism. Highlights include a vintage copy of He Disappeared into Complete Silence (1947), comprising nine engravings and nine disquieting parables; Germinal (1967), a strangely compelling marble sculpture; and 'M is for Mother' (1998), a drawing of an imposing letter M that conveys not only maternal comfort but also maternal control.

  • Apr 5, 2016 11:17 AMPower and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World
    Washington, DC—An unprecedented exhibition of some 50 rare bronze sculptures and related works from the Hellenistic period will be on view at the National Gallery of Art from December 13, 2015, through March 20, 2016. Previously at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, "Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World" showcases bronze sculptures that are remarkably lifelike, often enhanced by copper eyelashes and lips and colored glass or stone eyes. Of the many thousands of bronze statues created in the Hellenistic period, only a small fraction is preserved. This exhibition is the first to gather together so many of the finest surviving bronzes from museums in Europe, North Africa, and the United States.

  • Nov 23, 2015 12:47 PMThe Baroque Woodcut
    Washington, DC—The last flowering of the woodcut in its classic form will be revealed in The Baroque Woodcut, an exhibition of approximately 80 prints and illustrated books on view at the National Gallery of Art, October 28, 2007, through March 30, 2008, in the West Building prints and drawings galleries. Woodcuts achieved a final triumph in the baroque era when painters of outstanding caliber, such as Peter Paul Rubens and Guido Reni, chose it as a dramatic means for expressing the energy and refinement of their draftsmanship.

  • Nov 23, 2015 11:10 AMAn Enduring Legacy: Masterpieces from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon
    Washington, DC—French, British, and American paintings, sculpture, drawings, watercolors, and prints are included in a memorial exhibition highlighting the gifts and bequests of Paul Mellon (1907-1999), one of the founding benefactors of the National Gallery of Art and its most generous donor. An Enduring Legacy: Masterpieces from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon presents eighty-nine works, including fourteen rare waxes by Degas. It is on view in the East Building of the National Gallery from 7 November 1999 through 27 February 2000.

  • Oct 23, 2015 2:52 PMIn Light of the Past: Twenty-Five Years of Photography at the National Gallery of Art
    ashington, DC—In Light of the Past: Celebrating 25 Years of Photography at the National Gallery of Art, on view in the West Building from May 3 through July 26, 2015, will commemorate more than two decades of the Gallery's robust photography program. Some 175 of the collection's most exemplary holdings will reveal the evolution of the art of photography, from its birth in 1839 to the late 1970s. In Light of the Past is one of three stellar exhibitions that will commemorate the 25th anniversary of the National Gallery of Art's commitment to photography acquisitions, exhibitions, scholarly catalogues, and programs.

  • Oct 23, 2015 2:49 PMThe Memory of Time
    Washington, DC—The Memory of Time: Contemporary Photographs at the National Gallery of Art, Acquired with the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund, on view in the West Building from May 3 through September 13, 2015, will explore the complexity of the medium's relationship to time, memory, and history. Seventy-six works by 26 international artists will be presented at the Gallery for the first time. The Memory of Time is one of three stellar exhibitions that will commemorate the 25th anniversary of the National Gallery of Art’s photography program.

  • Oct 13, 2015 11:30 AMModern Art and America: Alfred Stieglitz and His New York Galleries

  • Oct 9, 2015 12:36 PMIn the Tower: Barnett Newman

  • Oct 9, 2015 12:31 PMThe McCrindle Gift: A Distinguished Collection of Drawings and Watercolors

  • Oct 9, 2015 12:29 PMElegance and Refinement: The Still-Life Paintings of Willem van Aelst

  • Oct 9, 2015 12:28 PMShock of the News

  • Oct 9, 2015 12:22 PMMichelangelo's David-Apollo

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:51 PMEdvard Munch

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:40 PMA World of Bonds: Frederick Sommer’s Photography and Friendships

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:31 PMThe Art of Romare Bearden

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:25 PMIn the Tower: Nam Jun Paik

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:21 PMThe Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection: Selected Works

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:20 PMModern German Prints and Drawings from the Kainen Collection

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:16 PMDegas/Cassatt

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:12 PMGarry Winogrand

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:11 PMIn the Tower: Mark Rothko

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:10 PMPicasso's Drawings, 1890–1921: Reinventing Tradition

  • Oct 7, 2015 4:05 PMJoan Miró: The Ladder of Escape

Washington, DC—Body

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Anabeth Guthrie
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