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Teacher Workshops

Workshops are designed to help teachers find meaning and enjoyment in the visual arts that they can share with their students. These programs introduce art in the Gallery’s collection and in special exhibitions, explore interdisciplinary curriculum connections, and model methods for teaching with art. All programs include teaching resource materials for educators to take home.

Teachers of all subjects and grade levels (pre-kindergarten through grade 12), homeschoolers, and pre-service educators are welcome. For more information, please email us at [email protected].

Upcoming Programs

Please note:

The format of these programs is an online Zoom meeting. This means that your image and voice may be recorded if you choose to turn on your camera and/or microphone. By registering, you give consent for the National Gallery of Art to use that recording in any media, including on the Gallery’s website and social media accounts, as well as in a noncommercial educational online course that will be made available to the general public on a third-party platform.

Mary Cassatt, Woman with a Sunflower, c. 1905
MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom
Connecting Art and Social-Emotional Learning: Fostering Personal Agency
Thursday, March 11, 2021 12:00 p.m. or 4:00 p.m.

Registration Links:

12:00 p.m.      4:00 p.m.

Description:

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators, a guest teacher presenter, and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers. It connects works of art to social-emotional learning, focuses on social awareness, reflects on what we care about, and cultivates a sense of personal agency. Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.

In honor of National Women’s History Month, this online teacher workshop includes a discussion (via the Zoom chat feature) of a work of art by 19th-century American artist Mary Cassatt. We will use thinking routines from Artful Thinking and Visible Thinking at Harvard’s Project Zero. Special guest teacher Grace Bogosian will share documentation of student work as a picture of practice from her elementary classroom. We will discuss how to apply art in our various teaching contexts to promote social awareness and a sense of personal agency in students and ourselves. Ready-to-use, adaptable resources will be available for teachers to replicate and integrate into their own lesson planning.

Aaron Douglas, The Judgment Day, 1939
MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom
Connecting Art, Social-Emotional Learning, and Poetry: Finding Our Voices
Thursday, April 8, 2021 12:00 p.m. or 4:00 p.m.

Registration Links:

12:00 p.m.      4:00 p.m.

Description:

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators, a guest teacher presenter, and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers, connecting works of art to social-emotional learning (SEL) and poetry in order to explore the voice of the artist, the poet, and ourselves. Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.

This online teacher workshop includes a discussion (via the Zoom chat feature) of a work of art by 20th-century American artist Aaron Douglas. In honor of National Poetry Month, we will use thinking routines to explore complexities of the work and the poetry that inspired it. Special guest teacher Tondra Odom will share documentation of student work as a picture of practice from her virtual SEL classroom. We will discuss how to apply art to support student voice and expression in various teaching and learning contexts. Ready-to-use, adaptable resources will be available for teachers to replicate and integrate into their own lesson planning.

Mary Cassatt, Woman with a Sunflower, c. 1905, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Chester Dale Collection, 1963.10.98; Aaron Douglas, The Judgment Day, 1939, oil on tempered hardboard, National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Patrons’ Permanent Fund, The Avalon Fund, 2014.135.1

Past Programs

Emilio Amero, Mother and Child, 1935
MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom
Connecting Art, Young Adult Literature, and English Language Learning
Thursday, January 14, 2021 12:00 p.m. or 4:00 p.m.

Registration Links:

12:00 p.m.      4:00 p.m.

Description:

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators, a guest teacher presenter, and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers, connecting works of art to young adult literature and English Language Learning (ELL). Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.

This online teacher workshop includes a discussion (via the Zoom chat feature) of a work of art by 20th-century Mexican printmaker Emilio Amero. We will use thinking routines to explore complexities of the work and strengthen reading comprehension. Special guest teacher Kristen Kullberg will share documentation as a picture of practice from her classroom. We will discuss how to apply art in our own language arts and ELL teaching contexts. Ready-to-use, adaptable resources will be available for teachers to replicate and integrate the program’s activities into their own lesson planning.

Romare Bearden, Tomorrow I May Be Far Away, 1967
MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom
Connecting Art and Social Studies Curricula: Lessons on the Great Migration
Thursday, February 11, 2021 12:00 p.m. or 4:00 p.m.

Registration Links:

12:00 p.m.      4:00 p.m.

Description:

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators, a guest teacher presenter, and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers, connecting works of art to social studies curricula and civic education, focusing on the Great Migration. Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.

This online teacher workshop includes a discussion (via the Zoom chat feature) of a work of art by 20th-century artist and writer Romare Bearden. We will use thinking routines from Art as Civic Commons at Harvard’s Project Zero. Special guest teacher Sean Felix will share documentation as a picture of practice from his classroom. We will discuss how to apply art in our own social studies teaching contexts. Ready-to-use, adaptable resources, including examples from Uncovering America, will be available for teachers to replicate and integrate the program’s activities into their own lesson planning.

Sir Edwin Landseer, Alpine Mastiffs Reanimating a Distressed Traveler, 1820
MOOC Meetup: Live via Zoom
Connecting Art and Imaginative Storytelling
Thursday, December 3, 2020 12:00 p.m. or 4:00 p.m.

Join National Gallery of Art museum educators and a community of participants from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Teaching Critical Thinking through Art for a live, online MOOC Meetup session for teachers connecting to a narrative painting through imaginative storytelling. Experience a lesson that can be easily applied in virtual or in-person classrooms.

This online teacher workshop includes a discussion (via the Zoom chat feature) of a work of art by 19th-century British painter Edwin Landseer. We will use thinking routines to strengthen reasoning with evidence and imagination, followed by a creative writing extension. We will also reflect on how art and writing can be used to activate both critical thinking and imagination. Ready-to-use, adaptable resources will be available for teachers to replicate and integrate the program’s activities into their own lesson planning.

František Kupka, Localization of Graphic Motifs II, 1912/1913
Exploring Complex Global Issues through Slow Looking
Thursday, January 30, 2020 4:00–7:00 p.m.

In a world saturated with images, from the superficial to the horrific, how do we focus attention on what truly matters? This workshop will explore one of the most pressing issues of our time—mass migration—through the immersive video installation by Richard Mosse: Incoming (2014–2017). Participants will experience the power of slow looking in exploring works of art, ourselves, and our world. The workshop will model the Voice & Choice and Parts-Purposes-Perspectives thinking routines (tools designed to facilitate investigation of complex topics) and consider the role of artist as activist. The program will conclude with time for reflection and connections to classroom practice.

Arthur Dove, Moon, 1935
Mindful Looking and Making
Saturday, February 29, 2020 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

This Saturday workshop is designed as a creative and reflective retreat for educators of all disciplines and contexts. Learn mindfulness meditation techniques to support clarity and strength of mind. Relish in slow looking by exploring the exhibition True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europes, 1770–1870 through sketching, journaling, and creative writing exercises. We will create accordion books as a tool for capturing observations, playful wondering, and reflective thinking—nurturing a process-oriented practice for building alertness. Come ready to disconnect from the digital world in order to reconnect with yourself and find inspiration in nature and art.

Using Art to Explore the Refugee Crisis
Saturday, March 7, 2020 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Lunch provided

“I believe that beauty is the sharpest tool in the box; I think that aesthetics can be understood as the opposite of anesthetic; it can be used to awaken the senses rather than to put you to sleep. We have a moral imperative to adequately communicate these difficult narratives so that people can be more aware.” —Richard Mosse

In 2019 approximately 272 million people became international migrants. More than 71 million (half of these children less than 18 years old) were forced to flee from collapsed economies, violence, failed governments, political or gender persecution, and environmental change. Some migrants sought official asylum, while others secretly crossed borders. Some stay in a growing number of refugee camps and detention centers, and some will live in the shadow of the law for most of their lives.

The devastating scale of this continuing crisis raises fundamental questions about narrative and responsibility. In a world of growing mass displacement, how can the story of millions of human beings caught at a historical crossroads be told? How can the arts provide opportunities for these issues to be addressed in the classroom?

These two questions will guide a day of learning centered on contemporary artist Richard Mosse’s Incoming installation. Educators will learn about forced migration and explore how to use the arts to explore difficult topics with their students. Specifically, we will:

  • experience and reflect on Incoming by Richard Mosse, using thinking routines transferable to classroom practice;
  • learn about the contemporary global phenomenon of forced displacement and the legal frameworks that govern it through a panel presentation;
  • reflect on the unique leveraging power of the arts to help us understand the refugee crisis; and
  • explore our own responsibility toward others and our capacity for action.

Emilio Amero, Mother and Child, 1935, lithograph, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection, 1943.3.43; Romare Bearden, Tomorrow I May Be Far Away, 1967, collage of various papers with charcoal, graphite and paint on paper mounted to canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Paul Mellon Fund, 2001.72.1; Sir Edwin Landseer, Alpine Mastiffs Reanimating a Distressed Traveler, 1820, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patron’s Permanent Fund, 2019.120.1; František Kupka, Localization of Graphic Motifs II, 1912/1913, oil on canvas, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund and Gift of Jan and Meda Mladek, 1984.51.1; Arthur Dove, Moon, 1935, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Barney A. Ebsworth, 2000.39.1; Richard Mosse, still from Incoming #88, 2014–2017, digital chromogenic print on metallic paper. © Richard Mosse. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

In-service workshops are designed for educators to learn how works of art can support student learning. The Gallery offers a limited number of onsite opportunities for groups with a minimum of 20 participants.

Please complete this form to request a workshop.

You may cancel a workshop enrollment via email to [email protected] or your Eventbrite account.  Login to Eventbrite and go to the "My Tickets" page. Click on "View Order" and then click "Cancel Order." Note that if you reserved multiple spaces, this will cancel all reservations. If you need to make a change to the number of participants, please contact [email protected]. Refunds are not available. We appreciate your understanding and cooperation with our policies.