Admission is always free Directions

Open today: 10:00 to 5:00

Release Date: August 26, 2011

Fall Lecture Series at the National Gallery of Art Highlights Artist Ann Hamilton, Warhol, and Bochner Exhibitions, New Books by Noted Authors, the Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture on Italian Art, and a Panel Discussion, The Image of the Black in Western Art

Washington, DC—This fall, the National Gallery of Art offers an extensive array of public lecture programs featuring a distinguished group of notable authors, artists, and scholars. Rounding out the season are two public symposia, five book signings, a Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture, the Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture on Italian Art, and a panel discussion.

At the beginning of the fall lecture season, artist Ann Hamilton will give a public lecture for the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series on Friday, September 16. For nearly 30 years, Hamilton has been making multimedia installations with stunning qualities and quantities of materials. The Gallery owns 15 works by the artist, including photographs, prints, sculptures, and a video installation.

Overview

Opening at the Gallery on September 25, the exhibition Warhol: Headlines serves as the inspiration for a public symposium on Saturday, October 22, featuring Thomas Crow, Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art and associate provost for the arts, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University; Jonathan Flatley, associate professor of English, Wayne State University; and Neil Printz, editor of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné and board member of the Andy Warhol Foundation. In addition to the symposium, two lectures explore themes of the exhibition: Warhol's Headlines: To Whom Does the News Belong? by Molly Donovan, curator of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art (September 25), and Time Frames: Andy Warhol's Film and Video by John Hanhardt, senior curator for media arts, Smithsonian American Art Museum (December 4).

Author lectures and book signings this season include the September 15 program Art Theft and the Case of the Stolen Turners, in which Sandy Nairne, director of the National Portrait Gallery, London, discusses the pursuit of two important paintings by J.M.W. Turner that were stolen from a German public gallery in 1994 while on loan from the Tate Collection in London. On Sunday, September 18, Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art, presents the lecture My Faraway One: The Letters of Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz exploring the relationship between the two artists, who exchanged more than 5,000 letters between the years of 1915 and 1946. On Monday, September 26, author and historian David McCullough delivers a lecture titled Morse at the Louvre in conjunction with A New Look: Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre, on view in the Gallery's West Building through July 8, 2012.

In honor of In the Tower: Mel Bochner, the first exhibition in this series featuring the work of a living artist, two lecture programs will be held in its opening week. On Sunday, November 6, James Meyer, associate curator of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art, introduces the exhibition with a lecture focused on Bochner's famous Portraits series of the 1960s and his recent Thesaurus Paintings. On Wednesday, November 9, Mel Bochner joins James Meyer for a public conversation about the exhibition titled Conversations with Artists: Mel Bochner.

On Sunday, November 13, Carl Brandon Strehlke, adjunct curator of the John G. Johnson Collection, Philadelphia Museum of Art, delivers the Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture on Italian Art. In his lecture, Bernard Berenson and Lorenzo Lotto, Strehlke explores American art historian and connoisseur Bernard Berenson's (1865–1959) decision to publish his 1895 monograph on Renaissance painter Lorenzo Lotto. Strehlke's lecture is the 15th in an endowed series named for Italian art specialist Sydney J. Freedberg (1914–1997).

On Sunday, December 11, David Bindman, emeritus professor of the history of art, University College London, joins Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University, and Sharmila Sen, general editor for the humanities at Harvard University Press, for the panel discussion Image of the Black in Western Art, Part II, moderated by Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art.

All lecture programs are presented free of charge and take place on Sundays at 2:00 p.m. in the East Building Auditorium unless otherwise noted. Seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

Public Symposia

In the Tower: Nam June Paik
Friday, September 23, 2:00 p.m.
Illustrated lectures by noted scholars Christine Mehring, associate professor of art history and director of graduate studies, University of Chicago, and Stephen Vitiello, associate professor of kinetic imaging, Virginia Commonwealth University. The lectures will be followed by a conversation with Ken Hakuta, executor of the Nam June Paik estate, and Jon Huffman, curator of the Nam June Paik estate. Moderated by Harry Cooper, curator and head of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art

Warhol: Headlines
Saturday, October 22, 2:00 p.m.
Illustrated lectures by noted scholars, including Thomas Crow, Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art and associate provost for the arts, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University; Jonathan Flatley, associate professor of English, Wayne State University; Neil Printz, editor of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné and board member of the Andy Warhol Foundation

Lecture Programs

Art Theft and the Case of the Stolen Turners
Thursday, September 15, 3:30 p.m.
Sandy Nairne, director, National Portrait Gallery, London
Book signing of Art Theft and the Case of the Stolen Turners follows

Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series
Ann Hamilton
Friday, September 16, 3:30 p.m.
Ann Hamilton, artist

My Faraway One: The Letters of Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, 1915–1933
Sunday, September 18, 2:00 p.m.
Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art
Book signing of My Faraway One: The Letters of Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Volume 1, 1915–1933 follows

Warhol's Headlines: To Whom Does the News Belong?
Sunday, September 25, 2:00 p.m.
Molly Donovan, associate curator of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art
Book signing of Warhol: Headlines follows

Morse at the Louvre
Monday, September 26, 3:30 p.m.
David McCullough, author and historian
Book signing of The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris follows
This program is coordinated with and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art

Harry Callahan at 100
Sunday, October 2, 2:00 p.m.
Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art

A New Look: Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre
Sunday, October 9, 2:00 p.m.
Peter J. Brownlee, associate curator, Terra Foundation for American Art
This program is coordinated with and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art

Some Pages from Michelangelo's Life
Sunday, October 16, 2:00 p.m.
Leonard Barkan, Arthur W. Marks '19 Professor of Comparative Literature and director, Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts, Princeton University
Book signing of Michelangelo: A Life on Paper follows

Leonardo da Vinci: Artist of Sketchbooks and Notebooks
Sunday, October 30, 2:00 p.m.
Carmen C. Bambach, Andrew W. Mellon Professor, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art

Introduction to the Exhibition—In the Tower: Mel Bochner
Sunday, November 6, 2:00 p.m.
James Meyer, associate curator of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art

Conversations with Artists: Mel Bochner
Wednesday, November 9, 3:30 p.m.
Mel Bochner in conversation with James Meyer, associate curator of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art

The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture on Italian Art
Bernard Berenson and Lorenzo Lotto
Sunday, November 13, 2:00 p.m.
Carl Brandon Strehlke, adjunct curator, John G. Johnson Collection, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Antico: The Making of an Exhibition
Sunday, November 20, 2:00 p.m.
Eleonora Luciano, associate curator of sculpture; Dylan Smith, Robert H. Smith Research Conservator; Naomi Remes, exhibition officer; Donna Kirk, senior architect and designer; Brad Ireland, publishing designer, National Gallery of Art

Time Frames: Andy Warhol's Film and Video
Sunday, December 4, 2:00 p.m.
John Hanhardt, senior curator for media arts, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Image of the Black in Western Art, Part II
Sunday, December 11, 2:00 p.m.
Panel discussion includes David Bindman, emeritus professor of the history of art, University College London; Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University; and Sharmila Sen, general editor for the humanities, Harvard University Press. Moderated by Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art.
Book signing of The Image of the Black in Western Art, Volumes 1–3 follows

Introduction to the Exhibition—The Invention of Glory: Afonso V and the Pastrana Tapestries
Sunday, December 18, 2:00 p.m.
Barbara von Barghahn, professor of art history, The George Washington University

Works in Progress

All lectures take place on Mondays and selected Tuesdays in the East Building Small Auditorium at 12:10 and 1:10 p.m.

More than Ninety Miles Away: A Dialogue with Cuban Artist Carlos Garaicoa
Tuesday, September 6, 12:10 only
Carlos Garaicoa in conversation with Michelle Bird, curatorial assistant, department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art

Tomas Rivás: Traveling Light
Monday, September 12
Tomas Rivás, artist, in conversation with Faya Causey, head of academic programs, National Gallery of Art
This program is coordinated with the
AMA—Art Museum of the Americas, Organization of American States

One Thousand Folds: What to Do With Your Diptych
Monday, September 19
Catherine A. Metzger, senior paintings conservator, National Gallery of Art

The Quiet Laotian: Oil on Bamboo
Monday, October 3
Daniel B. Shay, art services manager, National Gallery of Art

More than Ninety Miles Away: A Dialogue with Cuban Artist Kadir López Nieves
Monday, October 17, 12:10 only
Kadir López Nieves in conversation with Michelle Bird, curatorial assistant, department of French paintings, National Gallery of Art

Typography, Page Design, and Publishing at the Bauhaus
Monday, October 24
Yuri Long, rare book specialist, National Gallery of Art

New Light on John Taylor Arms
Monday, November 7
Charles Ritchie, associate curator of modern prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art

A Page in the National Gallery of Art from Giorgio Vasari's Album of Renaissance Drawings
Monday, November 14
Kimberly Schenck, head of paper conservation, National Gallery of Art

The Only Restorer Degas Trusted: Charles Chapuis
Monday, November 21
Ann Hoenigswald, senior conservator of paintings, National Gallery of Art

Evidence and Context: Opening Nonfiction Videos
Monday, December 5
Joanna Raczynska, assistant head of film programs, National Gallery of Art

4 May 1925: A New Museum for a New Country
Monday, December 12
Fulvia Zaninelli, research assistant, Kress Collection Provenance Research Project, National Gallery of Art

General Information

The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are at all times free to the public. They are located on the National Mall between 3rd and 9th Streets at Constitution Avenue NW, and are open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Gallery is closed on December 25 and January 1. For information call (202) 737-4215 or visit the Gallery's Web site at www.nga.gov. Follow the Gallery on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalGalleryofArt, Twitter at www.twitter.com/ngadc, and Instagram at http://instagram.com/ngadc.

Visitors will be asked to present all carried items for inspection upon entering. Checkrooms are free of charge and located at each entrance. Luggage and other oversized bags must be presented at the 4th Street entrances to the East or West Building to permit x-ray screening and must be deposited in the checkrooms at those entrances. For the safety of visitors and the works of art, nothing may be carried into the Gallery on a visitor's back. Any bag or other items that cannot be carried reasonably and safely in some other manner must be left in the checkrooms. Items larger than 17 by 26 inches cannot be accepted by the Gallery or its checkrooms.
 
For additional press information please call or send inquiries to:
Department of Communications
National Gallery of Art
2000B South Club Drive
Landover, MD 20785
phone: (202) 842-6353
e-mail: pressinfo@nga.gov
 
Anabeth Guthrie
Chief of Communications
(202) 842-6804
a-guthrie@nga.gov

Subscribe to Our E-mail Newsletters
Stay up to date with the National Gallery of Art by subscribing to our e-mail newsletters: Web, educators, family programs, fellowships/internships, films, lectures, music programs, and teen programs. Select as many updates as you wish to receive. To edit your subscriber information, please go to our subscription management page.

Press Kit

Press Release

Questions from members of the media may be directed to the Department of Communications at (202) 842-6353 or pressinfo@nga.gov

The public may call (202) 737-4215 or visit www.nga.gov for more information about the National Gallery of Art.

RSS (NEWS FEED)
http://www.nga.gov/content/dam/ngaweb/press/rss/press_feed.xml

NGA NEWSLETTERS:
Stay up to date with the National Gallery of Art by subscribing to our e-mail newsletters: Web, educators, family programs, fellowships/internships, films, lectures, music programs, and teen programs. Select as many updates as you wish to receive. To edit your subscriber information, please go to our subscription management page.